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Vol.9 





THE 


Herald of Truth. 


A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY PAPER, 


DEVOTED TO THE 

Exposition of Gospel Truth, and the Promo- 
tion of Practical Piety. 

-EIDITIEID BY J\ IF 1 . BXJ3STIKI- 


VOLUME IX. 


How sweet arc thy words unto my taste! Yea, sweeter than honey 
to my mouth. Through thy precepts I get understanding ; therefore l 
hate every false way. Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto 
my path . 1 ’s. I 1 it : 1 ()d. 1 05. 

Cast, thy bread upon the waters; for thou shalt find it after many 
days. In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening withhold not 
thine hand; for thou knowest not whether shall prosper, either this or that 
or whether they both shall be alike good, Eccl. 11 : 1, (I. 


ELKHART. INDIANA: 


I 

. 


JOHN F. FUNK & BROTHER, PUBLISHERS AND PRINTERS. 

1872 . 








INDEX TO VOLUME IX. 


55, 131, 148, 


125, 138, 


A Bargain is a Bargain 
Advice to young Christians 
An Address 

Advantages of Plain Attire at Church 
A Call to the Young 
An Exhortation 
A Very Sad Accident 
A Request 
Acts that Tell 
Awake and Repent 
A Sad Occurrence 
A Remarkable Adventure 
A Call to Sinners 
A Pure Language 
A Word of Consolation 
A Man Steadfast in the Faith 
A Sudden Death 
Another Great Fire 

Rear the Yoke 

Book List 16, 32, 48, 64, 80, 96, 1 12, 
By the Grace of God I am what I am 
Be Strong in the Lord 
Brevities 151, 172, 181, 

Begin with God 

(Just thy Bread upou the Waters 
Christmas Day 
Colonization of Kansas 
Conferences 40, 56, 72, 137, 

Conference in Ohio 

in Illinois 

— — in Indiana 

Amish Mennonite 

A General 


Page. 

28 
28 
38 
46 
50 
161 
62 
74 
76 
102 
183 
141 
150 
156 
165 
167 
174 
183 


Condescension of God 
Crowding Thoughts 


54 

128 

119 

150 

182 

157 

1 

5 

28 

153 

88 

88 

169 

89 

138 

158 
1 58 


God’s Commands 
Glory of the Cross 
Gospel Truths 

God’s Grace and Consolations 
Gems 

Great Wonders in little Things 

Have Faith in the Lord 

Humility 

Heaven 

How can I be Accepted as Righteous 
I Wish 

In the Beginning was the Word 
Is God Omnipotent? 

I am the Way 

Incentives to Youthful Devotiou 


Deaths 


14, 29, 46, 62, 78, 94, 111, 
12 7. 143. 159, 174. 190 


I* USE. 

35 

53 
71 

163 
173 
182 

20 

54 

106 

147 

21 

54 

126 

129 

148 

86 

90 

39, 154 
136 
139 

139 

140 
166 


CAGE . 


Judge Not 
Job’sPatience 

Kansas, The Colony 
Kansas. From 

From Marion Co. 

From McPherson Co. 

Kansas 
King David 

Letters Received 15, 30, 47, 63, 79, 95, 111, 
127, 143. 159, 175, 191 
Love your Enemies 37 

Little Things 84,101 

Love to God 182 

Music and Religion 2 

Marriages 14, 29, 46, 62, 78, 94, 127, 174 


Man’s Reward 
Meekness 
Merits of Christ 
Motives in Religion 

Jfews from the Churches 


Disobedience to God and the Punishment 

21 

()ur Trust in the Lord 


6 

Do good 

7 7 

Our Responsibility 


7 

Dead 

173 

Our Time is Short 


29 



Otxr Homes 


51 

Editorials 8, 9, 24, 40. .>6, 72, 88 104, 

Oriurin of the Memonite Church, and 

120, 136. 102, 168, 

184 1 

t he Life of Men no 

65. 83, 99, 

1 15, 130, 

Enough 

23 


1 46, 

162, 178 

Escape for thy Life 

67 

Our Responsibility 


78 

Earthquake in Syria 

i i 

Obituary 

94. 

158. 190 

Exhibitions 

87 

Our Sunday School 


125 

Election of Ministers 

121 

On Dress 


131 

Extract from the Martyrs Mirror 

134 

Our Trip to the W est 


169, 185 

Forgive 

37 

Our Need of Christ 


190 

Fear Not 

76 

Profitable Conversation 


119 

From the Church in Elkhart county 

194 

Pure Beligion 


126 

Faith 

118 

Peace 


149 

Further Account of the Death of 


Pocket Dictionary 


191 

II. A Brennemau 

1 53 




Faith Manifested by \\ orks 

173 

Questions 


75. <6 


69 

85 

105 

180 

121 


Repentance 1 9 

Rejoicing in Hope 21 

Repent 36 

Rejoice 55, 7 1 

Reading the Scriptures is like Traveling 75 
Receiving the Spirit 91 

Regeneration 103 

Redemption * 133 

Serious Thoughts 1 9 

Sister Rebecca Hartman 40 

Suffer the little Children to Come unto me 51 
Scripture Facts 62 

Serving God in little Things 70 

Sunday Schools 72 

Sinner, Consider what You are doing 75 
Songs and Song Writers 77 

Sinful Amusements 104 

Severe Misfortune in Mo. 108 

Satan’s Sacrament 117 

Scripture Facts 119 

Statement of Funds sent to the Sufferers 

by the War in France 120 

Scripture Illustrations 126 

Salvation is Offered to all Men 

The New Year 
The Great Object of Life 
To the Young 

The Promises of Religion to the Young 
The Great Fires 
The Necessity of Suffering 
The Witness of the Heart 
The New Birth 

The Lord is Merciful and Gracious 
The Herald 
Terrible Accident 
Try the Spirits 
The Covering of the Head 
The Kansas Colony 7, 39, 

The Way of Life 
The Duty of Parents to Children 
The Law and a Christian 
The Righteous are Bold 
The Unanswerable Question of the 

great Salvation 81, 97, 

The Fear of God 
The Momentous Question 
The Sin against the Holy Ghost 
The Mennonites in Russia 88 


To the Young 
Thy Kingdom Come 
The Bible 

The Goodness of God 

The Great Counselor 

The Love of Christ Constraineth us 

The Old Landmarks 

The Day is far Spent 


104, 

121 , 

92, 


166 

1 

3 

3 

5 

6 

J 

13 

22 

23 

27 

29 

33 

38 

154 

49 

53 

69 

78 

113 

84 

85 
87 

106 . 

136 

108 

103 

11)3 

107 

118 

132 

133 
142 




PAGE. 

The Massacre 142 

The Object in View 150 

To Think About 150 

They Will not Come unto Me 151 

The Perfect One 157 

To the Lord give Glory 164 

The Omnipotent God 165 

The Way of Salvation Plain 166 

Thanksgiving 168 

The Russiau Brethren 168 

The Coming Year 168 

The Old Woman’s Damsons 178 

The Beloved Disciple 176 

They shall Hunger no more 179 

The Duty of Forgiveness 179 

The Duties of a Mother 181 

The Horn Book 1 81 

The Covenant with Noah 182 

Vanity of Vanities l3l 

Valedictory 185 

What Jesus has Commanded, and also 

, what He has Forbidden 17 

Watch and Pray 29, 52 

Wants of the "■oid 67 

Work Harder 71 

W hat shall we Do with the Charity Funds 76 
Worldliness in the Church 86 

Why Live Beneath our Privileges 91 

We Shall Find Pasture 145 

What is Needed . 1 5 7 

Words of Cheer 173 

What Ministers should Preach 173 

What must we Do to be Saved 180 

Correspondence. 

Visit to Ohio 9, 57 

Canada 10 

Pennsylvania 11, 122, 138 

Elkhart, Ind. 11, 59 

Indiana 24, 105 

Virginia 4], 123 

Illinois 41, 188, 1 89 

the North 42 

Tazewell Co., Til., Tnd. and Mich* 42 

Fayette and Cambria counties Pa. 43 

Stark Co., Ind. 59 

New York and Canada 73 

New York 89 

Kansas and Mo. 123 

A Journey to 111 , Ind. and Ohio 43 

Mo. and Kansas 170 

Ind. and Mich. 170 

Ohio and Ind. 189 

From the Church in New Orleans La. 24 

Lancaster, Pa - 25 

Illinois 44 

Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Pa. 44 



PAG*. 

Missouri 

45 

Augusta Co., Va. 

58 

Knox Co., Tenn. 

59 

Pennsylvania 

123 

Marion Co., Kan. 

139 

Canada 

140 

Branch Co., Mich. 

154 

the Church in Canada 

/ 

171 

Letter 

89 

From McPherson Co., Kausas 

90, 139 

Fron Pennsylvania 

123 

From Tennessee 

171 

Of Thanks 

Visit to the Church in Missouri 

188 

Children’s Department. 

At Home Again 

61 

A Hard Way 

93 

A Pleasant Way 
A Talk to the Children 

110 

140 

A Good Name 

155 

A Child’s Illustration 

194 

A Letter from Russia 

124 

Be not Proud 

12 

Christmas 

193 

Children, be Kind to each Other 

196 


From my little Friends ]3 

Food for the Lambs 13, 27, 45, 61, 75, 94, 
111, 125, 141, 156, 172, 196 
From a Child HO 

Fighting 194 

Going Near to God ] 93 

Heaven and Hell 93 

Happy Children Love each Other 141 
Happy Children 195 

Home Sweet Home 196 

Letters from the Children 26, 45, 60, 74 

My Travels 13, 25, 59, 74, 93, 124, 194 
Manners 75 

New Year 45 

Our Extra 194 

Search the Scriptures 13 

Speak the Truth in Love 61, ]56 

Scripture Alphabet 74 

Seed Sowing 4 55 

Something for Boys to Think of 155 

Suffer the little Children to Come unto Me 195 

The New Year 12 

The Power of God 25 

The Way to Heaven 110 

The Bible 140 

To our Bible Readers ion 


I The Books of the Bible 
The Books of the New Testament 

Unhappy Children 

Verses to Young Children 

Whom God Loves 
Winter 

Poetry. 

Another Year is Past 
At Home 

Another Week is Past 
A Warning Voice 
Autumn Thoughts 

Benedictions 

Children, Love One Another 
Consecration 

Chief of Sinners though 1 Be 

Follow Thou Me 

Farewell of the Soul to the Body 

God’s Love 

If I Come to Jesus 
I Am the Lord’s 
I Must Die 

I’m Lonely since my Mother Died 

Jesus the Savior is Born 

Lines on the Death of Catharine Mann 

on the Death of J. H. Culp 

on the Death of Levi Longenecker 

on the Death of Orson G. Marsh 

on the Death of Jacob S. Hershey 

On the Death of Henry Wituier 
Sister Naomi Holdeman 

Prayer 

Procrastination 

Praise the Lord our King 

Salvation Extended to All 
Submission 

The Hardened Hearts 

The Departed 

The Day is Near 

Through Night to Light 

The Invitation 

Take up thy Cross 

The Old Man in the Stylish Church 

Time’s Speedy Flight 

Walking with God 
Walking with Jesus 

Ie( 'annot Serve God and Mammon 






A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY JOURNAL. 

* • ' — 1 ■■ 

“How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.” 


Vol. 9-No. 1. 


ELKHART, INDIANA, JANUARY 1812. 


Whole No. 97. 


For the IleraUI of Truth. 


The New Year. 

Dear reader, who ever you are, 

I wish you a Happy New Year. 
Now let us reflect for a moment and 
take into consideration the flight 
and value of time. 

Another year has rolled around, 
and how many of our fellow men, 
who enjoyed life and health with 
ns last New Year, are now no more 
here, but are gone to reap in a fut- 
ure world, what they had sowed in 
the present, and many of us who 
are yet enjoying life this New Year 
will, ere it is ended, be obliged to 
take the same course, and perhaps 
you or I will be one of them, and 
perhaps both. Oh! indeed we can 
not overestimate the value of time. 
But by making proper use of it, we 
will be happy in this world, and in 
the future ; and if wemak e proper use 
of our time, we will make proper 
use of every other blessing that we 
enjoy. So let us with the help of 
God make good use of the time 
that will he granted unto us, and if 
we do live to see another New Year 
it will be a happy one; because 
nothing can give us more perfect 
happiness than the consciousness 
of making good use of our time, 
and by so doing we will lead a life 
pleasing to God, and at the snme 
time we wall be sowing seeds that, 
will grow and ripen in a growing 
harvest from which we whall reap ev- 
erlasting joy and happiness. 

Life is short, too short for strife, — 

Put a world of kindness in it; 

When there’s good that can be done, 

Do not wait, but just begin it ; 

Do not dream of coming days, 

All the future overr a ting ; 

Wherefore trust, an idle dream? 

Life is short, too short for waiting. 

Teach we kindness unto all, 

From the pitying ones above us? 

Let us love our fellow men, 

As the blessed angels love us, 


Work in love and work in faith ; the Church to a more earnest and 

Trust me, ’tis a noble calling, zealous work; the ungodly arewarn- 

It is almost eventide, ed to flee the wrath to come, and to 

Soon the shadow will be falling.^ ^ take refuge in. a crucified Savior. I 
Cmoy, Pa. S. E. E. remember well the days when I was 

— — wandering as a fugitive without 

For the iieraw of Truth, hope in God. I had by sin and 
Cast til) Bread upon the Waters, transgression far separated myself 


Dear Readers, How often has the 
Herald of Truth gladdened our 
hearts when we felt sad and de- 
pressed in spirit ! AY ere not our hearts 
made to feel full of joy when we sat 
down and read over the many ex- 
hortations and admonitions given? 
Did not the heart feel glad when 
perusing over its pages and seeing 
so many laboring and toiling to en- 
courage the brethren and sisters to 
press onward, walking in self-denial , 
having a pious and godly walk and 
a pure conversation seasoned with 
salt, that it may administer grace? 
Has not its motive been to buildup 
the cause of Christ, and to spread 
abroad, far and near, the truth of 
God’s holy word and will, in the 
midst of its many enemies, and be- 
fore its many obstructions? Still it 
has found its way to many of those 
that sat forsaken in a lonely day, 
and when reading its tidings of 
good news, the dark cloud was re- 
moved; all was bright; faith took 
hold of the soul; the mind was car- 
ried forward to that beautiful home 
which was prepared by Christ. 1 
have sat down many an evening 
with tears, reading over the many 
! pieces written by a weak brother 
and sister, trying by the grace and 
help of God to give comfort and 
1 consolation to the troubled soul. 
Oh, how often has my heart been 
I made to feel glad u po n seeing how 
busy and zealous the brethren were 
in trying to give those proper in- 
structions that are so needful to di- 
rect the soul to Christ, warnings 
after warnings and exortations after 
I exortations are given to awaken 


transgression iar separatea mysen 
from a loving God, but by some di- 
rection of God, which I must believe, 
there was handed to me a paper to 
read, which I believe was done un- 
thinkingly, as the person seemed 
to oppose the publication of such a 
paper (yet he himself was a believer 
in a non-resistant doctrine) and 
after reading over its pages I found 
an article written therein which 
brought me to reflect upon my dis- 
obedience to God; it directed me to 
flee the vengeance of a just God. 
My heart was in fear; trouble was 
on every side, afflictions came; there 
was no rest day nor night; I tried 
to conceal it, and did so for nearly 
two years, but the Spirit of God 
still strove with me. One day I left 
my work and went to get comfort, 
and when I approached my men, 
two in number, my heart, was over- 
flowing with guilt; I spoke and said 
here I am; what must I do to be 
saved? they kept silent. I said, can 
you give me no counsel? not a word 
was spoken. When I loft them they 
said, “AVefeel ourselves too weak.” 
The following Sabbath I was asked 
to go and hear a preacher by the 

name of and as we were on 

our way we passed the man who 
was to preach. I told my friend 
that I thought we would not have 
much of a sermon to-day. My friend 
asked me, why ? 1 told him that he 
did not look much like a preacher, 
but to my surprise, I was deceived. 
11,. took: Ills Text from the words, 
“ What must 1 do to be saved?” Oh 
1 felt ns if God had sent him to tell 
me these words, namely, that 1 
t should be saved. 1 slinll never for- 
I ,r ( .t the great burden that fell from 

1 CD 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


Kan. 


me that day. I thought and believed p 
it to be true when God said, “I e 
will send men unto you of my own a 
heart.” From that day till now, X \ 
have never doubted the visitation of \ 
God’s love towards me. I loved the \ 
brethren and do now, and shall, by j 
grace, continue to do so until death, i 
though they may be called the tilth t 
and offscouring of the world. I love 1 
the poor despised Galileans and ] 
Nazarenes, the oppressed children 1 
of God. Dear reader, I must believe * 
that the Herald of Truth was the 1 
means used by God to bring me to < 
reflect ; not that the Herald is the 1 
word of God, which we should obey, i 
but God works by means, through ; 
his servants, and many read the < 
truth of God’s word through the < 
Herald that have not the opportuni- 
ty of hearing the person speak. If 
the Herald had not fallen into my 
way, I might to this day not have 
taken the step which 1 have taken. 
Oh let the Herald be spread abroad; 
let none of God’s true children, stop 
its progress; it bears forth the 
Truth of God’s word, and who can 
deny it? If its truths are obeyed in 
and from the heart all will be well 
beyond the grave. Let us then all 
work together, seeing the day* of our 
pilgrimage are drawing to an end. 
soon our labor and toil will cease, 
and if we have been faithful to our 
Lord and Savior we have a hope 
that lies far beyond this world of 
afflictions, trials and temptations. 
Oh, ought not we to be encouraged 
to press on? Let us not grow weary 
in well doing, for in due season 
we shall reap, if we faint not. 
Dear reader, here we have to strive 
and agonize, but in yonder heaven 
we will have rest; and our joy will I 
be to praise God day and night, in 
the midst of fathers, mothers, broth- 
ers, sisters, husbands, wives, sons 
and daughters. Oh what a prom- 
ise, what a joy, what a comfort to 
live forever with God, with Jesus, 
with angels, and all the heavenly 
host! Oh brothers, oh sisters in 
the Lord, let us be more watchful 
this year; let us by a pious walk, 
and a godly conversation prove 
ourselves to be the children of God. 
These virtues will speak louder 
than our lips; we need not tell the 
world that we are Christians; our 
love to God and love one toward 
another, is the best proof to a world 
ruined in sin. It is too much the 
fault of Christians to talk and dis- 
pute with each other about minor 


points of doctrine. We know c 
each church has her government, } 
and to convince them that they are t 
wrong only causes strife, and the >• 
world becomes disgusted at the 
wrangling of professors one with < 
another. Let us show by our walk ] 
and conduct, and kind treatment t 
towards them, thot we are trying to ; 
live as our Master left us an exam- 
ple. The Savior who came from 1 
heaven to teach men the way of 
salvation, showed by his example 
that he obeyed and fulfilled the will 
of the Father, and if w 7 e are born of 
the Spirit, we will partake of the 
same nature, mind and disposition, 
and we will manifest the same love to 
our enemies ; seeing then what man- 
er of persons w r e ought to be, if we 
wish to be saved, let us go forth in 
the fear of God, loving one another, 
doing all things without murmur- 
ing and disputing, that we may 
be blameless and harmless the sons 
of God, without rebuke in the midst 
of a crooked and perverse nation, 
among whom ye shine as lights in 
the world, holding forth the word of 
life. 

Oh ! then let us be in earnest in 
doing good to our fellow-men, and 
laboring for the interest and salva- 
tion of our never dying souls. We 
all have a work to do ; let us not be 
so selfish, and put our hands upon 
our laps and say, I have nothing to 
do. There is none but what have 
one talent to improve, and if we put 
i it to proper usury it w r ill gain one 
more. The Herald has a good field 
i to labor in ; there is room for one 
talent, for two, for live, for ten ; the 
; Lord needs them all in his vineyard, 
i May he help us all to be faithful in 
! our trust given unto us, so that at 
i his coming we may be welcomed as 

- faithful servants at the right hand 
a of God, in the kingdom of heaven, 

- is my prayer. B. F. Newcomer. 

> Medway, Ohio. 


countries, all sorts of feelings and 
various kinds of sentiment, have 
taken on the poetic form and are 


sung. 


For the HeraM of Truth. 

Music and Religion. 

ItY ABNER Y. ZOOK. 

God has wisely endowed us with 
an intellectual and emotional nature 
and music is the language of emo- 
tion; it is the natural method by 
which thoughts are reduced to feel- 
ing, more easily, more surely and 
more universally, than by any oth- 
er way. Hence in all ages, in all 


It is a provision of God, by w hich 
the great spiritual truths of the gos- 
pel are made nutritious, and sus- 
taining to our souls. There is a 
yearning for a brighter life in a 
hymn, and under the singing of a 
hymn we come into sympathy with 
the truth asw T e seldom do under the 
preaching of a sermon. How quick- 
ly a man’s word changes under the 
influence of singing; all are not 
alike susceptible, but all are sus- 
ceptible to some extent. In some 
people the intellectual nature pre- 
I dominates; in others the emotion- 
al. Therefore those of a purely in- 
tellectual nature cannot join in this 
'part of sacred worship with as much 
feeling, as those of an emotional 
nature; but there are certainly very 
few persons that cannot be moved 
somewhat by sweet soul- stirring 
strains of melody. What can be 
, more pure, and refining than to 
mingle beautiful strains of melody, 
with sweet words of praise? Lifted 
up out of a w r orld of toil, and anx 
iety, we are wafted by the wings of 
melody into the sphere of tlieinvisi- 
i ble, into the realization of things 
> remote from our natural under- 
i standing; we draw nearer to God, 

) and there confess with a deep sense 
* our sinfulness, plead for his mercy, 

: praise and adore his holy name; 

; what can be more pleasing and ac- 
l ceptable to God, than a meek liuni- 
? ble cpirit, bursting forth spontane- 
i ously in a song of praise? It is 
. then the highest form of divine wor- 
i ship, and true worship of God, true 
t imitation of Christ the divine Sav- 
3 ior, the highest standard that man 
1 can attain. In the Bible we areconi- 
, manded to develop those traits of 
character that will make us like 
Christ, and this should be the high 
est aim of man. We as Christians 
should feel it very wicked in us to 
live from day to day without pray- 
er; but the command to pray, is 
not any more explicitthan the com- 
mand to sing. Paul in his letter 
to the Ephesians writes these words, 
h “Be filled with the Spirit, speaking 
e to yourselves in psalms and hymns 
»- and spiritual songs, singing and 
y I making melody in your hearts un- 
i- to the Lord.” 

d Religion consists in Contrition 
i- (a feeling of sorrow for sin), Ke- 
ll I pentance (a feeling of hatred to sin), 


1872 


3 


HEBALD OIF 1 TELTJTH. 


Devotion (a feeling of love and rev- 
erence to God), and we cannot sep- 
arate the idea of feeling from relig- 
ion. The fact is, there is no such a 
thing as religion without feeling, 
and if there be anything true, be- 
yond contradiction, it is that sing- 
ing is the best expression of feel- 
ing. Christians who are in the 
habit of contending about creeds 
and doctrines, and who cannot 
agree in any point, can come to- 
gether on these grounds and have 
the same gush of holy feeling. 
Certainly then no one can fail to 
see thevirtueof good singing as a de- 
votional exercise. Singing with a 
soul-reviving melody has a tenden- 
cy to soften our harsh nature, but 
music, under which the singers are 
prone to sleepiness is worse than 
none at all. Better not sing at all 
than sing ourselves to sleep. We 
should be wide awake in the glori- 
ous cause of Christ. It is evident 
that we are either earnest and wide 
awake, or careless and lukewarm; 
and lukewarmness is absolutely 
loathsome to God; men differ in re- 
gard to the way hymns should be 
sung, but this arises more particu- 
larly among those who are not ac- 
quainted with the principles of mu- 
sic. We all agree that the object 
of singing as commanded by Paul, 
is to add melody to the hymns, and 
it naturally follows that the nearer 
melody is brought to perfection, the 
greater will be its accomplishment 
in the refinement and edification of j 
mankind. Melody is produced by 
the mingling of the natural tones of 
the human voice, not an invention 
of man, but a discovery of the en- 
dowment which our all-wise Creator [ 
has so kindly imparted to us. 
Then why should we be afraid of 
singing well? If we sing poorly we 
fail to meet the ends for which mu- 
sic is intended. If we trace music 
back to its early history we will 
find that it was in universal practice j 
among all the churches of the earli- 
er dates. Music was first intro- 
duced in the Jewish service by Mo- 
ses, and afterward was much im- 
proved in the reign of David, but the 
proper use of music, like many oth- 
er things is much abused, and as 
our thoughts are often vain, fool- 
ish and impure, it is evident that 
they will appear in the form of 
singing, but any sentiments that 
are not wicked in the form of 
thought, are not wicked in the form 
of song. 


For the Herald of Troth. 

The Great Object of Life. 

“But seek ye first the kingdom of 
God and his righteousnes, &c.” 

It is the' conviction of every think- 
ing mind that the “Sermon on the 
mount” of which our text is a part, 
expresses completely and yet con- 
cisely the very want of our spiritu- 
al natures. If there existed in my 
mind a doubt of the divinity of Je- 
sus Christ, a perusal of this sermon 
would cast reproach upon me for 
my skepticism. “ Seek first,” what 
a "lesson is here taught to parents. 
So bring your treasures to the Lord 
that he may be honored by your 
sacrifices; that you may teach your 
children by your example that 
i their first duty is to God; that they 
I should seek the Lord in their youth; 
and that you may teach that sinner 
wiio has forgotten that he has a 
soiil that will beeitherlost or saved, 
the existence of things of might- 
ier importance than the accumula- 
tion of wealth. The text is very 
expressive. Seek implies not only 
a willingness to become a Christian, 
but a heartful desire, a searching 
anxiety for truth and righteousness 
This is a work which the true Chris- 
tian believer never completes. 
There is no time when we can cease 
seeking. We need to practice all 
the means of grace to keep the fires 
of faith burning. How vain then 
that man should expect to enter the 
kingdom of heaven, when he gives 
this subject only a casual thought. 
How often do we enter the abodes 
of those who profess the name of 
Christ and although we remain day 
after day we hear not the voice of 
prayer or the words of that holy 
book called the Bible. That sacred 
volume is the compass which di- 
rects us to heaven; and if we neglect 
it we will certainly loose the way. 
To seek the Lord is th& only way 
to success in this life for he prom- 
ises that “all these things shall be 
added unto you.” Why can we 
not believe the Lord and accept his 
road to success ? Has he ever proved 
untrue? Has he ever deceived a 
single soul? Why then neglect his 
commands and follow him whom 
we know has ever deceived. Oh, 
that the Lord may open our eyes to 
our position, and enable us to see 
tin' danger that is threatening us. 
May we trust him, obey his com- 
mands, seek his kngdom now and 
be saved. It. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

To the Young. 

SEEK THE LORD EARLY. 

“Remember now thy Creator in 
the days of thy youth, while the 
evil days come not, nor the years 
draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I 
have no pleasure in them.” Eccl. 
12 : 1 . 

Dear young people, This call is 
extended to you all without excep 
tion. Our God who is the Creator 
of heaven and earth and all things 
therein, is a merciful God, and not 
wishing that, we should die in our 
sins he so kindly invites all men to 
come unto him, to seek him early 
and to remember him as our Crea- 
tor in the days of onr youth. When 
the Lord had created Adam he 
breathed into his nostrils the breath 
of life, and he became a living soul. 
With such a soul eacli and every 
human being is possessed and can 
never come to naught. r lhis soul, 
which is the life of man, God has 
intrusted to our care, to each one 
individually; we have to care and 
provide for it in this life, and fit 
and prepare it for eternity. From 
God we have received it and to him 
it will return again when we die, to 
receive whatsoever we have pre- 
pared for it in this life, be it good 
or evil. 

O how careful and concerned we 
should be in regard to the salvation 
of our souls. The greatest and 
most important work we have to 
perform in this life, is to care for our 
never dying souls; reconcile our- 
selves to God, and be prepared to 
meet him in peace, when he shall 
call us hence to give an account of 
our stewardship here. We have 
all to appear before the judgment 
seat of Christ to render up an ac- 
count of our conduct or deeds done 
in the body, whether they be good 
or bad. Therefore, “Remember now 
thy Creator in the days of thy 
youth, while the evil days come not, 
nor the years draw nigh, when thou 
shalt say, I have no pleasure in 
them.” 

Men are inclined to evil from their 
youth up, and have a conflict to 
contend with within themselves 
when they arrive to the years of un- 
derstanding, and can discern good 
from evil, for the adversary of our 
<oul s is then so assiduously en- 
gaged with divers batterings and 
malicious devices to ensnare and 


ZHZFFaA-XjIE) OF TBTJTii. 


p«. 


lead us from that which is good, in 
order to extend his kingdom; whilst 
on the other hand the Spirit of God 
convinces us in our consciences, that 
if we do not abstain from the evil 
lusts of the flesh and ways of the 
world, we cannot stand before him 
on that great day. Paul say s, “ The 
flesh lustetli against the Spirit, and 
the Spirit against the flesh : and these 
are contrary the one to the other.” 

Here we perceive that man has 
ever a conflict within himself to con- 
tend with, as the flesh and the Spir- 
it are contrary to one another, and 
the flesh being inclined to evil and 
to have its own will and not yield- 
ing submission to the will of the 
Spirit; but remember that if we 
yield to the will of the flesh we are 
opposing God, “for he that soweth 
to the flesh shall of the flesh reap 
corruption; but he that soweth to 
the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap 
life everlasting.” And again, “Ab- 
stain from fleshly lusts, which war 
against the soul.” The evil lusts in 
the flesh and the evil thoughts that 
may arise in our hearts we must 
subdue and cast them from us, not 
allowing them to reign within us, 
but yield submission to the good 
Spirit which will reprove us of our 
evil works, for Paul says, “ Watch 
in the spirit, and ye shall not fulfill 
the lust of the flesh.” 

By taking heed to the good Spir- 
it speaking to our consciences we will 
become strengthened and receive 
power to evercome evil, and shall 
for our reward reap life everlasting. 
But by expelling this good Spirit 
from our minds, and not opening 
unto it when it knocks at the door 
of our hearts, entreating for admit- 
tance, we cannot expect to be 
strengthened thereby and receive 
the help of Jesus, who is convers- 
ing with our hearts through his good 
Spirit, and consequently will be 
overtaken by the evil spirit, and 
the lusts of the flesh, and for our 
reward, we shall of the flesh reap 
corruption. Hence the necessity of 
remembering our Creator in the 
days of our youth, before the evil 
days shall come and the years 
draw nigh in which we must say, 
“I have no pleasure in them.” 

Hear young readers, if you have 
not yet become reconciled to God, 
the mighty Creator, spare neither 
time nor labor to do so while it is 
yet called to-day and while God 
yet grants you life, health and op- 
portunity. 


We have no promise of to-mor- lead us into darkness, in order to 
row and do not know whether we extend his kingdom. This deceiv- 
will ever see it. Yesterday is er may come to us in various ways, 
past and gone and cannot be recall- offering to us all the pleasures and 
ed, therefore it is of no value to enjoyments of this world if we serve 
those who let it pass unimproved, him, saying perhaps, Man has to 
But to-day, this hour is the time | go through this world but once and 
presented to us in which to remember I why not enjoy it &c.? But remem- 
our Creator and seek Jesus. Paul her, the pleasures of this world only 
says, “To-day, if ye will hear his gratify the flesh and are but of 
voice (the voice of Jesus), harden short duration. James, when re- 
not your hearts.” proving worldly desires, says, 

„ . . . i. ti i “Know ye not that the friendship 

How deplorable it is to behold ^] ie WO rld is enmity against God? 
the multitudes of people living so w ] losoevei . therefore will be a friend 
careless and unconcerned in regaid G fp[ ie W orld j s the enemy of God.” 
to the welfare ot their, souls, not ^ nd J 0 l in says, “If any man love 
giving heed to the feavioi s \ oice, the world, the love of the Father is 
which by the influence of the Holy ncd Therefore let us resist 

Spirit so oftem convinces them in ^his wicked one who flatters us 
their hearts of the dangerous post wit , the pleasures of tins world, 
tion they occupy. They refuse and and let us * turn to Je8lls in wllom w ’ 

leject the bavior, thinking at & , w ill U n d true iov and harminnss. 


more convenient season they vill y ea> i iapp i ness ' that will not end 
embrace him. Being well awaie. of w jth our lives here upon earth, but 

f h m n /1-i'if'tr t loir cmYintmiQU Tmint . _ -*■ _ 7 


with the jdeasures of this world, 
and let us turn to Jesus in whom we 
will find true joy and happiness, 


their duty, they sometimes point 
out a halting place in the future, 
saying, After I shall have obtained 
this or that, or shall be better situ- 
ated I will also repent and turn to 
Jesus; but after God in his good- 
ness has prolonged their lives and 
granted them health and prosperi- 
ty to reach that point to which they 


only become the more perfect. 

Yow then, dear young readers, 
having duly considered the matter 
and knowing well that we are sur- 
rounded with many dangers let us 
be cautious that we be not deceived. 
The Savior says, “Watch and pray 
that ye enter not into temptation.” 
W r e must constantly watch, crucify- 


aspired they are yet in a more un- ; the evil lusts the flesh and 
prepared condition than before, and = to God for llis aid and assist 
thus perhaps point out another £ nc £ and if we do this he wiu 
more convenient season. Thus the _ ’• + 


um C buuv™t B c r u. nQ wise snffer 11S to be tempted 

time of grace remains unemployed above that we al . e aWe to bear . v To 

and is neglected from time to time avoid many conflicts and tempta- 

until old age conies on and the Uon8 it is i great advantage to ns 
years draw nigh when they si, all bot]l ; u this w * rld and in th h e worU 

say, “I have no pleasure in them.” (o com „ t0 yield , lp our hearts to 

Youth is the seed time of life, ! God in our youth, “while the evil 
the convenient season to make a i days come not, nor flit 1 years draw 
covenant with your God and to Hlgt; when thou shalt say, I have 
serve him in meekness and lowli- no pleasure in them." 
ness of heart, for in the days of our In a natural sense we find that if we 
youth the heart is not yet so heavily desire to learn a trade of any kind, 
laden with the anxious cares of it is a great advantage to commence 
this world, and hardened with sin while young and active, as we will 
and vices, all of which make it an then, by timely practice become 
unlit temple for the Spirit of the more perfect in the execution of our 
Lord. God desires to dwell in our ' profession, than if we begin when 
hearts and they therefore must be old. Thus it is also in a spiritu- 
pure. The earlier in life we give al sense; if we resign ourselve to 
our hearts to God the more pleas- the will of God in the days of our 
ing it will be to him, and the more youth; become obedient to his corn- 
convenient to us; we become more mandments and willingly open unto 
firmly grounded upon that immov- hrmthe door of our hearts, it will be a 
able Rock, Christ Jesus, to with- great advantage to us which we shall 
stand the many temptations which never, no never regret, but we will a 


beset us on every side, and to over- 
come that wicked one, the great de- 
ceiver of souls who improves every 
opportunity to ensnare us and 


thousand times greatly rejoice. AYe 
would then in time learn to avoid 
the unnecessary troubles and cares 
of this world, and patiently resign 


1872 


5 


HEBALD OF TBTJTH. 


ourselves to the trials under which 
God may see proper to place us. 

To take upon us the yoke of 
Christ and to follow him is univer- 
sally looked upon by the young 
people as a heavy and burdensome 
yoke, they can see no pleasure and 
enjoyment therein; because it would 
deprive them of the privilege of en- 
gaging in the vain amusements of 
the world, which are an abomina- 
tion in the sight of God; but ever 
remember that he who comes to 
Christ with a candid and upright 
heart, and resigns himself wlioly to 
his will, asking him for wisdom 
and understanding, will find that 
there is no greater pleasure and 
gratification to be found in this 
world, than to give liis heart to Je- 
sus and have him as a dear friend 
by his side. Such a soul will in- 
deed experience that the yoke of 
Christ is easy and his burden light, 
for charity inaketli all things easy. 
And if we love Jesus we will willing- 
ly do as he commands us, prompt- 
ed by no other motive than charity 
to him. A true Christian desires 
nothing contrary to the will of God. 

What would it profit a man if he I 
would fare sumptuously every day 
in this world; possessing fame, fort- 
une and wealth, or would even gain 
the whole world, if he would loose 
his soul and be forever unhappy ? | 
And on the contrary, wliat can it 
harm us to be despised and disre- j 
spected by the world, if he lives in 
peace with his God? lie that walks 
faithfully in the commandments of 
God and possesses the love of Je- 
sus in his heart, cares but little what 
manner of evil men may falsely 
speak of him. Jesus himself says, 
“Blessed are ye, when men shall 
revile you, and persecute you, and 
shall say all manner of evil against 
you falsely, for iny sake.” This 
will not harm us in the least, but 
rather cause us to rejoice to know 
that we are found worthy to suffer 
persecution for Christ’s sake, for 
we well know that the sufferings of 
this world are not worthy to be 
compared with the glory which shall 
be revealed in us. Read the Bible 
diligently and remember your Cre- 
ator in the days of your youth, 
walk in his ways faithfully unto the 
end, and it will be well with you 
now and forever. Martin. 


Tor tlio Herald of Truth. 


Folly is joy to him that is desti- 
tute of wisdom; but a man of un 
derstanding walketli uprightly. 


The Promise of Religion to the Young. 

It is remarkable with what sin- 
gular tenderness the season of youth 
is always mentioned and wliat 
hopes are offered to the devotion of 
the young in every part of the 
Scriptures. It was at that age that 
God appeared unto Moses, when he 
fed his flock in the desert, and called 
him to the command of his own peo- 
ple. It was at that age he visited 
the infant Samuel, while he minis- 
tered in the temple of the Lord, in 
days when the word of the Lord 
was , precious, and when there 
was no open vision. It was at that 
age that his Spirit fell upon David, 
while he was yet the youngest of 
his father's sons, and when among 
the mountains of Bethlehem he fed 
his father’s sheep. 

It was at that age also that they 
brought young children unto Christ 
that he should touch them; and his 
disciples rebuked those that brought 
them. But when Jesus saw it he 
was much displeased and said to 
them “Suffer little children to come 
unto me and forbid them not, for of 
such is the kingdom of heaven.” If 
these then are the effects and prom- 
ises of youthful piety, Rejoice, O 
young man in thy youth, rejoice in 
the days which are never to return, 
when the God of nature reveals him- 
self to thy soul like the blessing of 
a grateful world. 

If already devotion hath taught 
thee her secret pleasures, if when 
nature meets thee in all its magnifi- 
cence or beauty , thy heart humbleth 
itself in adoration before the hand 
which made it, and rejoiceth in the 
contemplation of the wisdom by 
which it is maintained; if when 
Revelation unveils her mercies, and 
the Son of God comes forth to give 
1 peace and hope to fallen man, thine 
eye follows with astonishment at the 
glories of his path and pours, at 
fast over his cross those pious tears 
which it is a delight, to shed, if thy 
soul accompanieth him in his tri- 
umph over the grave and enteretli 
on the wings of faith [into that ha 
yen where he sat down at the right 
hand of the Majesty on high and 
enjoys the society of angels and of 
the spirits of just men made perfect 
and listenethto the everlasting song 
which is sung before the throne; if 
such are the meditations in which 
thy youthful hours are passed, re- 
nounce not, for all that life can offer 


thee in exchange for these solitary 
joys. The world which is before 
thee — the words which thine imagi- 
nation paints in such brightness, 
has no pleasure bestowed which can 
compare with these ; and all that 
its boasted wisdom can produce, 
has nothing so acceptable in the 
sight of heaven as this pure offer- 
ing of thy infant soul. 

In these days the Lord himself is 
thy shepherd and thou shalt not 
want. Amid the green pastures, 
and by the still waters of youth he 
now makes thy soul repose. 
But the years draw nigh when life 
shall call thee to its trials, the 'evil 
days are on the wing when thou 
shalt say, Thou hast no pleasure 
in them, and as thy steps advance, 
the valley of the shadow of death 
opens, through which thou must 
pass at last. It is then thou shalt 
know what it is to remember thy 
Creator in the days of thy youth. 
In these days of trials or of awe, 
liis Spirit shall be with thee and 
thou shalt fear no ill, and amidst ev- 
ery evil that surrounds thee, he shall 
restore thy soul. His goodness and 
mercy shall follow thee all the 
days of thy life, and when at last 
the silver cord is loosed thy spirit 
shall return to God who gave 
it, and thou shalt dwell in the 
house of the Lord forever. 

Wm. K. Blaucii. 


Christmas Day. 


Unto us a child is born, unto us a 
son is given; and the government 
shall be upon his shoulders, and 
his name shall be called Wonder- 
ful, Counsellor, The mighty God, 
The everlasting Father, The Prince 
of Peace, of the increase of his gov- 
ernment and peace there shall be 
end. Isa. 9: 0, 7. 


no 


Hosannah to King David’s Sou, 

Who reigns on a superior throne; 

We bless the Prince of heavenly birth, 
Who brings salvation down to earth. 

Let every nation, every age, 

In this delightful work engage, 

Old men and babes in Zion sing 
The 


• •■rowing glories ot their 


King. 


highest, and 
will towards 


Glory to God in the 
on earth peace, good 
men. Luke 2; 14. 

Selected by Moses Wai.do Nafziger. 
Dec., 25/7/, 1871. 



heral id of treth. 


gatt. 


For th» Herald of Truth I ca p upon him for assistance, and season of storms and piercing cold. 

Onr Trust in the Lord lie will lead us aright and not for- Shall we who have been mercifully 

Our trust in me sake us Christ said, “He that spared from these calamities sit by 

“Whoso puttcth his trust in the shall endure unto the end, the same our warm fires, gather around our 
Lord shall be safe.” Prov, 29 ; 25. shall be saved.” And again, “Lo, well-supplied tables, and sleep in 
„ . , , , T with you always, even unto our comfortable beds this winter 

The Scriptures abound with pre- * ke en( j 0 f the world.” He promis- without sending something to those 
cious promises to those who urn o es t 0 be with us always if we abide suffering fellow mortals? Wliat 
him, serve him faithfully and trust ^ and u . f God be for ^ who doth it pro flt, my brethren, though 
and confide in him. It is true, we ^ be inst ug? » Therefore a man say he hath faith, and have 

™. a 7 w? et W / tl i •? iany “trust in the Lord, and do good; not works? Can faith save him? 

tribulations, but if our j' tiole t t deJ . ht t ] iyse if a i so i n the Lord, If a brother or sister be naked, and 

ia . in , tl l e i r and he shall give thee the desire of destitute of daily food, and one of 

which is followed by a calm, only thine p ear t,. — Commit thy way un- you say unto him, Depart in peace, 
make the joys that follow so much totheLord . trust also in him ; and be ye warmed and filled,notwitli- 
the greater tfnd sweeter, d he Lord . pass.” To standing ye give them not those 

may often lay obstacles in our way Jf. » T . f 

\ -n rro wli icli nvpnppdfnl to t.h« bndv : 


Oar Trust In the Lord. 

“Whoso puttcth his trust in the 
Lord shall be safe.” Prov, 29 : 25. 

The Scriptures abound with pre- 
cious promises to those who turn to 
him, serve him faithfully and trust 
and confide in him. It is true, we 
may meet with many trials and 
tribulations, but if our whole trust 


™ ay ,dpr n t otiw ' oui fai\h in him this end may the Lord help us, for things which are needful to the body ; 
; n ut^kdowin^,aThetabodwho “whoso pulte.h Ms trust in the what doth it profit? 

„:,i vA nhoro iv.oi nvo Lord shall be safe.” Martin. When the Savior says, “Ye have 


but we knowing that he is a God who 
will not tempt us above that we are 
able to bear, let us stand firm and not 
allow ourselves to become discour- 
aged whatever may befall us. Job 
remained steadfast in his integrity 
when the Lord laid the hand of af- 
fliction upon him, and when his 
camels, sheep, oxen, his sons and 
daughters and all his many posses- 


ord shall be safe.” Martin. When the Savior says, “Ye have 

! r the poor with you always,” I do not 

For the iioraid oi Truth, understand him to refer only to the 

The Great Fires. poor among Christians ; but, if I un- 

* derstand him aright, he refers to 

The Herald for October contains the poor among men in general, as 


The Great Fires. 


but ye may do them good. If I un- 
derstand God aright in his good 


the name of the Lord.” And when He quotes many passages, both but ye may ao them gooa. lr 1 un- 
he was smitten with boils from the from the Old and the New Testa- derstand God aright m his good 
sole of his foot to the crown of his ments, to show what they teach in word, he does not care about, and 
head; and being reproached by his reference to the matter. probably will not reward, a grudg- 

wife, who said, “Dost thou still re- The recent great fires in the city ing giver, “hut this 1 say He 
tain thine integrity? curse God and of Chicago, and in the states of which sowetli sparingly shall reap 
die,” he answered her, “Thou Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, also sparingly; and he which sow- 
speakest as one of the foolish worn- and elsewhere had suggested some ®th bountifully shall reap also boun- 
en speaketh. What ! shall we re- thoughts in reference to the great tifully. Every man according as 
ceive good at the hand of God, and opportunity which they have crea- he purposetli in his heart, so let him 
shall we not receive evil?” ted for all who felt disposed to “cZo give; not grudgingly, or of necessi- 

Thus Job patiently bore the afllic- good ” to the thousands of homeless, ty ; for God lovetli a cheeriul giver, 
tion which was laid upon him and impoverished, and suffering men, 2 Cor. 9:6, 7. 


shall we not receive evil?” ted for all who felt disposed to “cZo give; not grudgingly, or ol necessi- 

Thus Job patiently bore the afllic- good ” to the thousands of homeless, ty; for God lovetli a cheeriul giver, 
tion which was laid upon him and impoverished, and suffering men, 2 Cor. 9: 6, 7. 

remained faithful unto the Lord, women, and children of those No doubt, many will say, We 
and the Lord finding him steadfast states. would gladly send these people 

in his trials, blessed him with twice About one third of the city of something, but we do not know where 
the possessions he had before. O Chicago was reduced to ashes, and, to send it. To all who feel like giv- 
that we may not so soon become among the forests of northern Mich- ing an opportunity is open, to ex- 
impatient and discouraged when igan and Wisconsin, a number of ercise their charity. Soon after the 
adversities befall us but patiently towns and villages were almost en- fire, a Relief Committee was organ- 
trust in the Lord, for the reward tirely destroyed, and several large ized in the state of Michigan, to re- 
will be sure. It will undoubtedly counties were swept by the devour- ceive and distribute money and sup- 


sometimes be for our good when af- 1 ing storm of fire which consumed plies. Everything to be sent should 
tliction is brought upon us, as it houses, barns, fences, grain, hay be directed, “Michigan Relief Com- 
may arouse us from our indiffer- ! and cattle, besides causing a great mittce , Detroit .” Would it not be 
once and timidity and revive our | loss of life. The people of Chicago well for churches to take up a free- 
drooping spirits in regard to our being at a great center of rail road will offering and appoint a brother 
duties. David said, “It is good communication will not be likely to send it? Or if this plan is not 
for ine that I have been afflictedgjto suffer so much for want of shelter approved, each individual, in the 
that I might learn thy statutes, and food as those people of there- exercise of his Christian liberty and 
Before I was afflicted I went astray ; mote and sparsely settled parts of liberality, can quietly enclose some- 
but now have 1 kept thy word.” northern Michigan and Wisconsin, thing in a letter, direct it as above, 
Paul says, “All things work togeth- where hundreds of families have and send it. If any cannot give 
er for good to them that love God.” been reduced almost to nakedness much, let them not be discouraged, 
Therefore let us be strong in the and dangerfrom starvation; and win- a little given from a pure motive is 
Lord, trust and confide in him and ter is now upon them, with its long better than the ostentatious gifts of 


'1872 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


the rich and proud. The poor wid- ' But here one might ask, What is 
ow of whom we read in Mark 12: that account to which you refer? 
42, gave two mites. A mite was a ! I will try to explain it to you as 
small coin made of brass, and its well as I can, but I feel too unworthy 
value was about one third of a cent, to give it such an explanation as is 
so that the poor widow really gave due to it. But now let me ask the 
only about two-thirds of a cent; question, Who is it that provides 
and, though many who were rich cast for us? Is it not our heavenly Fa- 
in much, yet the Savior says, “Ver- ther who provides for us, and who 
ily I say unto you, That this poor watches over us by day and by 
widow hath cast more in, than all night? and for what purpose? I 
they which have cast into the treas- suppose we would all answer, For 
ury; for all they did cast in of the reason that we should love and 


their abundance; but she of her serve him. But what is the service 
want did cast in all that she had, he asks of us? The first command 
even all her living.” to us is, repent, believe and be bap- 

Whatever is to be done for these tized, or in other words, Labor in 
suffering people should be done my vineyard. But what is the la- 
soon. The reader can find no better bor we shall perform here? I must 
time to enclose his offering in a confess I cannot describe it, but I 
letter than now. The best time hope I can describe so much of it 


for doing good is always to-day , 
for to-morrow may never come to us. 

J. K. IIartzler. 

McVeytown, Pa., Noe. 27/7/, 1S71. 


For the IleiaM of Truth. 


that we can see that we are all more 
in debt than we are able to pay. 
But here the question arises, What 
shall we do if we cannot pay? Here 
we have an example in God's word 
1 in the man who owed ten thousand 
„ „ .. .... pounds and was not able to pay. 

Our ltcspoiisibilit}. The command was, Sell him and all 

o i . -i , that he hath to make the payment, 

Beloved readers, Duty and love , t fell down , l )e f£ re M ’ 

press me to write a few lines to mastel . and p i ea a for mercy, and lie 
impress upon us the duty and ie- d hin * and the de j )t he re- 

sponsibility which rests uponus as , eased als0 Now asi we have clos . 
tiaveleis to a long ananjjveT~Tri - pd ano t) le r year, let us also look to 
ing eternity, and to adnrfimis i ns t accounts and try to balance 

look at onr past lives and see what in otller w g ds have the 

our condition is in this present t can( , eled and begin with 

world. If we look around us we f , on tUe New Year with 

see that another year is past, and “ ld watchfulness, 

it is natural for us to settle up our D S II 

old accounts with the old year, so ‘ [ 

that we know how our business has 

prospered during the past year. The Necessity of Suffering 
Now this is a wise plan and should 

be observed by all who work to The afflictions and trials that 
prosper in their business. But bring the Christian low, contribute 
here I would ask the question, How in the end to raise him to a higher 
does our account stand between us condition of lieavenly-mindedness. 
and our God? Are we also ready to They may be regarded as a corn- 
look at this account, and see wlietli- plication of inverse aids and assist- 
er we are able to balance it or not? ances, by a right use of which the 
I feel safe in saying that many of force of spiritual character may be 
the readers of the Herald are pre- more successfully displayed, it is 
pared to balance their accounts and not suffering then glory, but suffer- 
have a balance left them yet. But ing therefore glory . Our light alllic- 


here we will stop and consider our 
life account, if the same was present- 
ed before us, would we be able to 
balance it? We do not know what 


tion worketh out an exceeding great 
and eternal weight of glory. Nay, 
the Christian's very backs] i dings 


balance it? We do not know what work together for his spiritual and 
time we shall be called upon to give eternal welfare, and the very caus- 
an account of our stewardship, es of his fall will point to an inl- 
and then the final settlement will proved existence. Every failure 
come. I would here ask each of us, will administer to him a lesson of 
are we prepared to make that final future circumspection and humility ; 
settlement, which we all have to I and of his sins and shortcomings he 
make sooner or later? ' will construct a defense to his soul 


1 against future lapses, just as the 
farmer builds a wall to protect his 
field of the very stones which he 
had gathered out of it. In short, 
from the moment the Christian en- 
ters the strait gate to the end of his 
course, he advances by a spiritual 
recoil; he gains by loss; he is made 
perfect through suffering; he makes 
progress through retrogression. 
In this he follows afar off the exam- 
ple of his blessed Lord, who, though 
he was rich, yet for onr sakes be- 
came poor; who though the Creator 
and Proprietor of the whole uni- 
verse, condescended to the lowest po- 
sitions and offices on earth; who, 
though the Source of all wisdom 
and knowledge, the Originator of 
all law and the root of authority, 
was made under the law, that lie 
might, by his obedience and suffer- 
ings, redeem us from its curse. 
A l id for this subl i m e sel f-abnegatic n , 
this voluntary humiliation, God 
hath highly exalted him above ev- 
ery name, as a pledge and guaran - 
tee that all who are thus conformed 
to his image shall share his glory ; 
that those who suffer with him 
shall reign with him, that those who 
bear his cross shall wear his crown. 
— MacMillan. 


For the Ilunibl of Truth. 

The Kansas Colony. 

Four persons from Elkhart Co.. 
Ind., have been to see the Western 
Country, as intimated in my last. 
Now that they have returned, I 
would briefly say that the statement 
they give of the prospects of the 
country is more encouraging than 
otherwise, although tin* weath- 
-er at the time, was considerably 
colder than they expected to find it 
in central Kansas. Two of the par 
ty have bought and the other two 
intend buying. Two families from 
here are lining there now. One of 
them writes, “I like the country 
very well, and think you will make 
a good move to come to this coun- 
ty” (Marion). M. W. Keim (Land 
A'>ent), of Johnstown, Pa., writes 
under date of the loth ot Dec., I had 
a letter from Topeka this morning, 
stating tli at the R. R. Lands would be 
in the market in the course of a few 
weeks.” Daniil Bkennkman. 

Elkhart , hid. 


Keep thy heart with all diligence; 
for out of it are the issues of life. 


8 


t i j 


Fg--m-FP. AT.-n OF TRUTH. 


Ian. 


ffimtlb of jEfntfit. 

<Sf vp 


Elkhart, Ind., January 1872. 


To OCR Subscribers. — If any of our subscribers Jo not 
get their papers regularly, or If any persons who send lor 
books, Ac., do not obtain thorn in duo time, they will confer 
a favor by informing us, and wo will do our host to have 
everything properly forwarded to its destination. 

-o- 


Our Patrons will please examine care- 
fully the little slips or address labels on their 
papers to see whether they are credited cor- | 
rcctly or not. In the many changes which 
arc made in our mailing list at the present 
time, some mistakes may occur, and we will 
thank any one for advising us of any errors j 
they may discover. • | 


How to send Money. — If in sums more than a dollar, it 
la boat to obtain either a draft, or a Post Office money 
order, or where these cannot be obtained, get the letter 
registered. 

-o- 


Those of our subscribers who do not wish to take the 
Herald of Truth any longer, will please to inform us of 
the fact by letter and pay up all arrearages, and the 
matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it will 
be considered that they wisli to continue their subscriptions. 


MEETING CALENDER. 

For January 1872. 


NAMES OF CHURCHES. JANUARY 


Elkhart County, Ind. 


| 

| 

.1 1 


Elkhart Church 

o 

14 28 

11 

Vellotv Creek 

2 

1 

[4 28 

11 

Shaum’s 

o 

7 ; 

21! 


4 

Holdematt’s 

2 


14 1: 

28 


11 

Blosser’s 

4 

7 




4 

Christophel’s 

4 

J 

|21 



18 

Clinton 

2 

7 I 

j 21 



4 

Jones’ 

4 

7 ! 




4 

Metzler's 

4 

7 




4 

St. Joseph County. 







Mixel’s School-house 

4 


14 



11 

Johnson’s 

4 

7 




4 

Poplar Grovo 

4 


; 21 



18 

I.aG range County. 







Lake School-house 

2 


14 

28 


11 

Adams County. 







Augspurgers Church 

2 


I4 i 

28 


11 

Blanch County, Mich. 

£ 






rieusant Hill 

7 

21 



4 

York County, Pa. 







Baer’s Meeting-house 

G 



28 



Hershey’s 

6 





11 

Crolltown 

8 





18 

Baer's (Hanover) “ 

4 

7 




4 

Garber's 

G 





11 

Nieman’s 

8 






Stauffer’s (Stony Run) “ 

■1 



28 


25 

Cower /near River) “ 

■1 


14 

28 


1 1 

A damn County, Pa. 







Shank’s (Munimaw.) “ 

4 


21 


18 

Hostetler's 

■1 



128 

25 

Cumberland Co., Pa. 






Slate Hill 

«> 

7 

21 


4 

Cochlin’s 

■1 



2b 


25 

Mcchanicsburg “ 

8 


14 




Hertzlcr's (near Carlisle) 

■1 


141 



11 

Herr’s School-house 

8 


21 




Perry Co., Pa. 







llornisli’s Moeting-houso 

8 




11 

Dauphin Co., Pa. 






Schop’s (near Mobllet.) “ 

4 


14 



11 

Lebanon County, Pa. 







Gingrich’s (east of Lebanon) 

4 



2b 


25 

Overhclt.’s 

4 

1 

14 



11 

Can oil Co., Md. 







Zimmerman’s 

J- 


- 21 



18 

Allen Co., Ohio. 







Reil v Creek 


' 7 

21 



1 4 

Ohio. 







Medway School- lion so 

4 


1 1 

2£ 


25 


Now Yoar’s Greeting:. — We wish 

all our readers a happy New Y ear. Let us 
try to serve God faithfully, and do all the 
good we can, and God’s blessing will assured- 
ly follow us. 


Bro. Henry Yotherl-is moved (nun 
Livingston county, 111., near Line Spiings, 
Gage county, Nebraska, from w hich place j 
he writes as follows : “Esteemed brother and i 
co-laborer in the Lord’s husbandry, grace, | 
peace and mercy Trom God the Father and 
our Lord Jesus Christ be unto you, amen. 

“I have been and am still in Nebraska, 
one and a half miles West of Blue Springs, 
a thriving little town. YVe live near Jacob 
Headings. Geo. B. Gulp and son were here 
and went south, to Kansas, hut did not like 
the country there, so they came back and 
bought a house and lots in Blue Springs, 
but finally moved to Iowa. There is 
only one member of our church here beside 
myself, but 1 hope there soon will be more. 
Wc have had meeting since harvest.” 

Remarks. — We arc glad to hear that 
you have a meeting. Wc hope God will 
bless your labors, so that the name of God 
may be glorified and his worship established 
wherever our people go. The patiarchs of 
old, when they pitched their tents, erected 
altars and sacrificed to the Lord. So let 
us also seek first to establish the altars of 
our God wherever wc establish our homes. 
The harvest truly is great, hut the laborers 
arc few. — Editor. 

The English and German Herald, 

as all our patrons ire well aware, are sent, 
when the same person takes both papers for i 
the use of his own family, at $1.50 a year. 
There are complaints from some localities that 
neighbors join together in this way and ob- 
tain the two papers, one for each separate 
family, on these terms, under the pretense 
of getting it for one family. Now we would 
here plainly state that the intention of this 
is to induce families to take both papers for 
themselves and not for two neighbors orsep- j 
arate families. There may he German fam- 
ilies which are not well versed in English, \ 
which by this means may ho enabled to 
read English better ; or there may be fum- J 
dies where the parents are German and the ; 
children English and each may wish to l , 
have the paper to read, and yet not feel 
(juitc able to pay full price for both, or on 


the other hand the case may be the same 
in regard to those who have in a measure 
forgotten the German, by having both pa- 
pers they learn to read and understand the 
German language. Now for the benefit of 
such we have adopted this rule and we hope 
our friends will abide strictly thereby ; of 
course if any there he who arc too poor to 
pay for the paper they will be favored as 
much as possible. YY lien a man writes to 
have the English and German paper sent to 
his address, we cannot tell whether he wants 
them both for his own special use or wheth- 
er one is intended for his neighbor, but we 
always presume according to the offer we 
give, that it is for Ms oicn family ouly. But 
we will let the matter rest with these re- 
marks, and hope each one thus disposed, 
will act according to his best convictions ol 
what is right and honest in the sight of 
God. Let us be sincere in all our dealings. 


New Subscribers. — With the 
commencement of the New Year 
will be a good time to gather new 
subscribers. We hope our friends 
will make an effort to extend the 
circulation of the Herald as much 
as possible. As an inducement to 
this we will renew our former offer, 
that any person sending ns four 
new subscribers with four dollars 
to pay for the same shall have the 
Herald a year free for his trouble. 
This will be an easy way to obtain 
the paper free and we. hope many 
will avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to do so. 


In Sending the Names of Sub- 
scribers, write the name, Post-Of- 
fiee, County and town plainly, so 
that no mistakes may occur. Send 
money in Drafts, Post-Office Money 
Orders, or registered letters. Re- 
new your subscriptions as early as 
possible. 


Please Pay up. There are some 
few of our subscribers who are be- 
hind with their subscriptions for the 
paper several years. YVe hope 
they will use all reasonable dili- 
gence in trying to pay up. Our ex- 
panses are heavy and we need our 
money. And in this way our friends 
can help us a great deal. 


1872 - 


9 


EHEZR^ILID OIF 1 truth. 


The List, of Meeting-houses 

and meetings, which we have so 
far published in the paper, will 
be printed in the shape of a little 
almanac for the coming year and 
every subscriber of the Herald will 
receive one copy gratis. We do 
this to avoid the trouble of revising 
every month, which makes a good 
deal of labor for the printer, and 
perhaps it will be more convenient. 

Chicago Burned.— This is the 
Title of an octavo pamphlet of 32 
pages, giving a graphic description 
of the terrible tires in Chicago, in 
the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, 
and Minnesota, published by S. E. 
Woodworth, and is for sale at this 
office, and the balance still on hand 
will be closed out at 12 cents a copy 
by mail or 75 cents a dozen. 

Menno Simon’s Complete Works.— 

in the English language is now ready 
for delivery. All who wish to ob- 
tain this valuable work may have 
it promptly forwarded to them, by 
sending in their orders to this office. 
The price of the work is $4.50 cents 
per copy. Any person taking 12 
copies will receive one copy gratis- 
We have gone to a great expense 
in translating and publishing the 
work, so that our people might have 
the opportunity to examine and 
read the writings of the eminent 
reformer whose name our church 
bears, and we hope our friends will 
feel an interest in selling as many 
copies as possible. Single copies 
of the work may be sent by mail, 
and those wishing to have them 
thus sent will please add G4cts to 
the price for Postage. It may he 
obtained at the following places: 

J. E. Barr’s Bookstore Lancas- 
ter, Pa. 

J. C. Hunsicker, Berlin, Waterloo 
county, Ont. 

Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, 
Lancaster county, Pa. 

Jacob Funk, near Line Lexing- 
ton, Pa. 


Write for the Herald. — We 

hope our friends will not forget to 
employ their talents in writing for ; 
the Herald; we need more copy 
again, so that we may have plenty 
of original matter to fill our col- 
ums. It will make our paper much 
more interesting. Let us all help 
in the good work. 

The neYtf Meeting-house in the 

town of Elkhart is completed, and our first 
meeting was lield in it on Sunday the 2Gth 
of November. YY T c also had meeting at the 
same place on the 3rd of December, and 
from that forward our meeting will occur 
every two weeks. Our friends are always 
welcome to meet with us. 

The Martyrs’ Mirror.— The Mar- 
tyr 3 ’ Mirror in the German language is 
completed and now ready to deliver to sub- 
scribers. The Book contains a history of 
the Church — of her faith and practice — with 
many incidents and examples of the tyran- 
nical and bloody persecutions of the followers 
of Jesus from the times of the apostles to 
the year 1GG0 when the persecutions ceased. 

It is printed in quarto form, on good heavy 
paper, in a good sized readable type, con- 
tains over 1000 double column pages, is 
bound in full sheep with two clasps and costs 
$6.00 per volume. Any one taking twelve 
copies will obtain the thirteenth copy gratis. 

The book weighs about eight pounds 
and cannot ho sent through the mail. 

The New German Hymn-book. 

called the AUgemeine Licdersammlung, is now 
completed and ready for delivery. 
This book is a small work containing 41G 
pages, and 333 of the best German hymns 
with an appendix of English hymns, and 
a variety of metres best adapted to be 
sung both in private and public worship. 

The price of the work is as follows ; 

By mail postage prepaid per single copy, .Go 

« “ “ “ Dozen 8G. 50 

“ Express per Do/.. 5.50 

“ Express per hundred 845.00 

Our Family Almanac for 1S72 is 

now ready for delivery. It contains many 
good and interesting articles, and should 
find its way into every Mennouito family. 
All orders will be promptly filled by mail at 
10 cts. per single copy, or 70 cts. per dozen, 
or when sent by Express at 85. 00 per hun- 
dred, Express charges to be paid by the 
purchaser. 


orrrsponticncf. 


A Visit to Ohio. 


On the morning of Saturday the l8th of 
November I left home with the view of vis- 
iting our old home in Fairfield Co., Ohio. 

On Sunday I attended two meetings and 
a wedding in Elkhart Co., went yet the 
same evening to Bro. F. Landis’, who on 
Monday moruing brought me to Paris,* 
where I took the train for YVarsaw; thence 
to Elida, Allen Co., Ohio, where I expected 
to meet Bro. Gabriel Ilcatwole and wife 
from Virginia, according to previous ar- 
rangements, I was met at tho traiu hy Bro. 
II. A. Brenneman and wife, who informed 
me that Bro. Ileatwole had taken the morn- 
ing train in order to meet an appointment 
for preaching near YVinchester, Ohio, that 
evening. So I remained ou the train and 
went directly to Columbus, tu the morn- 
ing I again took the train there and came 
to YVinchester, where I soon found Bro. 
Ileatwole at the house of Bro. D Martin. 
Another meeting had been appointed for 
the evening which we attended. The con- 
gregation though small, seemed very atten- 
tive, and we felt that the blessed Jesus re 
membered his gracious promise given to 
the happy few who meet in his name. Sad 
to tell, there arc here hut few if any young 
members in the church. Oh what a pity • 
YVe are made to feel sad as we remember 
that the future prosperity of the church is 
depending much upon the efforts put forth 
by the young and rising generation. YY r e 
hope that those dear young friends to whom 
we spake with reference to the matter, will 
not forget, but remember that youth is the 
best, yea the proper time time to commence 
serving tlio Lord ; for as truly as the Lord 
has given warning, in his word of an evil 
day, it will come upon those who do not re- 
member their Creator in the days of their 
youth. 

From hove, accompanied by sister Good, 

we now proceeded on the train to Lancas- 
ter. Such was the interest felt in conver- 
sation on the part of Bro. Ileatwole and my- 
self, that really before wc ouee thought of 
such a thing, we were at our destination, 
and although our sisters alighted, and con- 
stantly affirmed that wc were at Lancaster, 
wc were still slow to believe it until my 
own eyes saw and recognized the place. 
The circumstance aptly serves as an illustra- 
tion of the manner in which men very 
often pass through life, having their 
minds so entirely absorbed in the tilings of 
this world, as to loose sight (as it seems), of 
their journey’s end, when all of a sudden, 
when perhaps least expecting it, they arrive 
at their destination, nnd where are they ? 
what is tho name of the place of their des- 
tination ? Is it heaven the home of the 
blest? Ah I fear not. By the way in 
which they came their minds were so 
taken up with the sinful pleasures and en- 

* 






10 


HBBALD OF TRUTH. 


fan, 


joyments of this transitory life, tliat tliey 
lost sight of God, and heaven, and heavenly 
things; now that death has suddenly over- 
taken them where are they.' 1 I fear 
where the rich man was, in hell, lor the 
word of God declares that “the wicked shall 
be turned into hell, and all the nations that 
forget God.” Oh then my dear friends, 
brethren and sisters, let us earnestly strive 
by the help of the Lord to retain God in 
our knowledge, and let this he our prayer. 
Let me die the death of the righteous, and 
let iny last end he like his. 

Alter spending a short time in toe city, 
in looking up and speaking a few words 
with some of my former acquaintances and 
relative friends, we hired a conveyance and 
in a very short time were brought to Bro. 
Joseph Kurts’, about five miles from town, 
who, after a pleasant interview with himself 
and family, brought us to the old neighbor- 
hood, near Bremen, where I was brought up. 
Passing through the village and by the way, 
we met quite a number of my former ac- 
quaintances with whom I could only speak 
a few passing words. We came to Tiro. ( . C. 
Beery’s, and in the evening attended a 
meeting at the old meeting-house, which 
was erected nearly as early as my first rec- 
ollection. Here I attended the solemn wor- 
ship of God the greater portion of my life; 
here the good spirit of God strove with me, 
time and again whilst seated under the 
sound of the blessed gospel, until T was 
made willing to yield myself to God. Here 
my first efforts were put forth, to declare the 
sacred truth of the gospel to dying men, 
and now that I was once more privileged, 
alter an absence of nearly five years, to 
meet with my dear brethren and sisters, 
whom l had not met for so long a time, 
and to worship God with them it afforded me 
more real joy and gratification than I am 
able to express. 

We remained in this and the adjoining 
neighborhood four days, during which 
time, wc attended seven meetings, in all of 
which much interest was manifested and wo 
hope and trust that our humble labors may 
not have been in vain in the Lord. Our 
time here was much too limited, and but for 
the reason that duty demanded that 1 should 
beat home again within a short time, I should 
have felt like remaining a week longer in this 
place, for like Peter, 1 felt that it was good 
to be there ; but duty called, and 1 must 
obey. We bade farewell to friends and 
kindred dear, commending them to God, 
and to the word of his grace. Bro. Benja- 
min Hoover consented to accompany me 
as far as Allen Co., to visit his friends there. 
In Columbus wc took leave of Bro. and Sis- 
ter Heatwolc. Our’s was in a measure the 
feeling expressed by the poet, “’Tis ha rd, 
’tis hard to part.” God bless the dear .Bro. 
aud sister. May his presence go with them ; 
may our dear brother sound loud, and long, 
the gospel trumpet ; may his earnest efforts 
be attended with God’s blessing, and may 
lie be instrumental in bringing many souls 
to Christ, to the glory of God. 


Bro. Hoover and I now came to Gallion, 
here we were met by Bro. Bitncr, who 
conveyed us to his house, where we attend- 
ed meeting in the evening, and enjoyed 
ourselves well. After meeting we went 
home with Bro. Freed (Minister), and spent 
the time pleasantly, and I trust profitably. 
In the morning we went to Crestline, took 
the train there and came to Lima, Allen Co. 
Here wc stayed over night at Bro. J M 
Brenneman’s, had meeting at the church 
the next, day, after which Bro. John accom- 
panied me to the brethren in the vicinity of 
Columbus Grove, where we staid over night 
with Pro. C. Steiner. 

In the morning wo went together to at- 
tend a meeting appointed at their church. 
There we also met Pro Steiner from Wayne 
(Jo., Oliio, minister among the Swiss breth- 
ren, who also took part in the services. It 
being thanksgiving day, the occasion was 
sought to be improved by remarks from. Col. 

•1 : 2. After meeting wo also attended a [ 
wedding, alter which 1 went to Columbus | 
Grove, and remained over night with the I 
brethren Geiger, and Burkholder. 

In the morning I took the train and by 
way of Toledo, arrived at home in the even- 1 
ing and found all well. 

To the all-wise God, be honor and glory , 
everlastingly, Amen. 

A charge 1 have to keep, 

Oh ’tis a sacred trust ; 

The Savior says, “Go feed my sheep,” i 
And see that none be lost. 

I 

u Feed” too, “my lambs,, says lie, 

Keep them within the fold, 

Teach them the enemy to flee, 

Lest he devour their souls. 

Oh Lord bestow thy grace, 

My charge may L fulfill; 

Oh grant that T may all my days, 
Evgage to do thy will. 

Daniel Bren n eman. 
Elkhart^ Indiana. 


A Visit to Canada. 


In company with my wife and 
Rudolph Retweiler and wife, I left 
homo on the 8th of November for 
the purpose of visiting the brethren 
and sisters in Canada. The next 
morning we arrived at Detroit Junc- 
tion, whore we laid over until seven 
o’clock in the evening. From there 
we went to Port Huron, a distance 
of sixty miles, where we crossed 
over into Canada on the boat, 
and then took the cars for Toronto. 
At Pori in Bro. Detweiler left us and 
Bro. Daniel Wismer and wife met 
us and accompanied us thence on 
our way. 

We arrived at Toronto on the 
morning of the 10th, where we took 
the cars for Markham. In the af- 


ternoon of that day we arrived at 
the residence of Mary Wideman, 
an aged aunt of my wife, who has 
lived in Canada now for seventy 
yeays, and during all this time she 
has not been visited by any of her 
nephews or nieces, and the joy of 
her heart in meeting, yet in her old 
age one of her dear kindred, was 
almost inexpressible. She is now 
over ninety years of age and has 
been entirely blind for some five or 
six years. 

On Sunday the 12tli we had meet- 
at Almira Meeting-house. Monday 
we spent in visiting among the 
brethren and sisters, among them 
several old and sick ones. On 
Tuesday the 14th we attended meet- 
ing at Wideman’s Meeting-house. 
The same evening we had meeting 
at Bro. Abraham Stovers, and the 
next evening (the 10th), we had a 
meeting at the residence of our aged 
aunt, Mary Wideman, who lives 
with her son Samuel. 

On Sunday the 19th, we had meet- 
ing at Snyder’s Meeting-house, in 
Waterloo County, and the same 
evening attended another meeting 
at Bro. Abraham Myers in the 
same neighborhood 
On Monday the 20th, we had 
meeting at Martin’s Meeting-house, 
and on Tuesday the 21st, at Christ- 
ian Eby’s Meeting-house, and in the 
afternoon of the same day at Cress- 
man's Meeting-house, and in the 
evening we had still another meet- 
ing at Bro. Joseph Hege’s. On the 
23rd, we had meeting at Latshaw's 
Meeting-house, and in the evening 
we had a meeting at Joseph Sny- 
der's near the town of Berlin. 

On the 24th accompanied by Bro. 
Snyder and wife, -we took the cars 
at Berlin, for Dunville and Rain- 
ham. At Paris Bro. Detweiler 
again met us and accompanied us 
on our journey. In the evening wc 
came to Bro. Christian Gehman's, 
where we remained all night, and 
on Saturday the 26th, we had meet- 
ing at the Lake Shore Meeting-house, 
and in the evening we had meeting 
by candle-light, in the Disciple 
Church, near Selkirk, and on the 
27th we had meeting in the house 
of William Sloan, whose wife was 
baptized and received as a sister in- 
to the Church. In the afternoon at 
two o'clock, we had meeting again 
in the Lake Shore Meeting-house, 
aud on the 28th, at the Cayuga 
Meeting-house, in the forenoon, and 
n the afternoon, at three o’clock in 


1872 


HUEZRaA-LID op truth. 


11 


the house of Bro. J. Rittenhouse. 
That evening we again went to Bro. 
Gehman’s, where we staid all night 
and the next morning Bro. Geh- 
nian took us to Dunville, where we 
took the train to Paris, here the 
brethren, Snyder and Detweiler left 
us to return to their homes, and we, 
taking the cars on the Great West- 
ern R. R., proceeded towards home 
and thanks be to God arrived safe- 
ly on the morning of the 30th and 
found our people all in the enjoy- 
ment of health and strength. 

I desire to express my sincere 
thanks to the brethren and sisters 
whom we visited, for the unmerited 
love and kindness which they, so 
freely manifested towards us; may 
God reward them therefor. And 
I also feel thankful to God for his 
kind and preserving care over us 
during our absence, and sincerely 
trust and hope that our humble ef- 
forts in attempting to proclaim the 
glad tidings of salvation unto a dy- 
ing world may be blessed unto the 
edification of many souls. 

After I had been at home two 
days I received a letter on the even- 
ing of the 1st of December, request- 
ing me to come to Elkhart County, 
Ind., and attend a meeting there on 
the 2nd, for the purpose of choosing 
and ordaining a minister in Ilolde- 
man’s Church, in that County. I 
immediately proceeded to answer 
the call and going to Burr Oak, I 
took the midnight train and arrived 
in Elkhart about two o’clock, aud 
then in the morning went, a dis- 
tance of fourteen miles to the Church, 
where eight candidates were nomi- 
nated, and when the lot was cast it 
fell upo n Bro. James Culbertson, 
who was accordingly ordained to 
the solemn office. The brother was 
not present when the election for 
candidates took place, and being 
sent for he was found at work in the 
field. The fact forcibly reminded 
me of the calling of David from 
keeping his father’s sheep, to be 
anointed king of Israel. May the 
Lord bless the brother in his sol- 
emn duties, and give him wisdom, 
understanding and strength from 
on high, in his labors, that he may 
he an instrument in his hands 
througk whTck many souls may be 
brought to Christ and thus glorify 
the name of our God and extend his 
kingdom among the children of 
men. 

The next day (Sunday), the com- 
munion of the Lord’s Supper was 


observed in this Church, of which 
many took part and the blessing of 
God seemed to be with our meeting. 
In the evening -we had meeting in 
the new meeting-house, in the town 
of Elkhart, and although the weath- 
er was somewhat unpleasant, a 
goodly number were assembled and j 
we had a pleasant meeting. We 
hope the blessing of God may at- 1 
tend our labors. The next day I 
returned home. 

Christian D. Beery. 
Burr Oak , Mich. 


A Visit to Pennsylvania. 

By request I would say to the readers of 
the Herald of Truth that on the 17th of 
October, iu company with my brother. P. Mar- 
tin and Bro. Philip Kilmer. I took the train 
at Goshen and went to Warsaw. At ten 
o’clock we took the train at Warsaw, and j 
iu twenty hours we arrived safely in Lewis- 
town Pa., and the next morning weut two ' 
miles to my. brother, Henry Martin, and 
thanks be to God, found them uil well. M e , 
remained with him two days, and then on 
the third day wc took the train and went to 
Thompsontown, Juniata County. There I 
met my sister and brother-in-law, Jacob Ly- 
der. 

The next morning, being Sunday, I was | 
met at the door, by my cousin, Jacob Gray- 
bill. bishop of the church in this vicinity, j 
who took me to meeting, a distance of about 
four miles, in his carriage. A goodly num- j 
her were assembled there, and among them 
quite a number of my near relatives. 
Preachers Jacob and William Gray bill and 
— — Gehuian were present. After meeting 
I was surrounded by a great many of my j 
friends and acquaintances, showing their 
kindness and well wishes and expressing ! 
their hopes that I would visit them. After j 
meet ing, Jacob G ray bill and I took diuuerq 
with J. Shelly, and b the evening wo Went 
to Jacob Gvaybill’s and staid all night. 

After spending several days with ray , 
friends there, I went to Middletown, Perry , 
county, where my brother Jacob Mai tin was I 
waiting the arrival of the train. We then 
crossed the Juniata liivcr and went to his i 
house, and Is spentafewdnys with him. On Sat- : 
urduy he took us to Richfield, where we ar- 
rived in time for the meeting at two o’clock, j 
There three persons were baptized and 
added to the church. On Sunday the , 
Lord’s Supper was administered. The j 
preachers present \verc Jacob and "William! 
Gravbill, Samuel Wiuey, Cousin Thomas j 

Graybill, Gehman, and Uncle Christian 

Gray bill, who is now 82 years old. Here I 
also I saw a number of my friends whom 1 ( 
had not met for many years. Wc spent | 
some time among our friends, going from 
place to place till we came to Cousin Wil- J 
liarn Graybill’s, where we were met at the | 


door by his kind mother. I desire here to 
express my sincere thanks to preacher and 
Cousin William; I have reason to believe 
that he is an ornament to the church. I 
then went to see Uncle Christian Graybill. 
He told me that he was the only Uncle 
that I yet had, and in various ways admon- 
ished me and advised me on many points. 
Then for the last time we went to Lost 
Creek Meeting where a parting or farewell 
hymn was sung. 

On the 20th of November wc came home 
and found all well. I desire also to express 
my thanks to the brethren and sisters whom 
we visited for the love and kindness mani- 
fested towards us whilst amongthcin. _ May 
God bless them aud strengthen them in his 
work. 

The ministers especially and many of the 
brethren also send their love and best wishes 
to the ministers, and brethren and sisters 
in the chureh in Elkhart county. 

Christian Martin. 

Wakarum, Elkhart County Indiana. 

A Visit to Elkhart, Ind. 

In accordance with the request of the 
brethren in Elkhart, Iud., I left home on 
Friday morning, Dec. 22ud, and went with 
Bro John Kelle’r to Burr Oak, aud came to 
Elkhart about four o’clock iu the alternoon. 

1 then went to Bro. John Yoders, about 
five miles South West of Elkhart, where I 
remained all night. 

The next day (Saturday), there was an 
appointment at Shaum’s Meeting-house for 
the purpose of electing and ordaining a 
minister and a deacon The weather was 
somewhat unfavorable, yet quite a number 
were present. There were four candidates 
for the ministry among whom the lot was 
ca:;t; and it fell upon Bro. Henry Shaum. 
May the Lord be with him and fit him as 
an instrument in his hand, through which 
much good may be accomplished and many 
souls brought from the darkness of sin unto 
the glorious light of the Gospel of Jesus 
Clmst. There were also eight candidates 
nominated for deacon and the lot fell upon 
Bro. Henry Christophel. May God also bo 
with him and give him grace and strength 
to fulfill faithfully the duties thus laid upon 

him. ( 

After meeting I went home with Bro. Hen- 
ry Shaum and spent the night pleasantly 
witli him and his family. 

On Sunday I attented meeting at Shaum’s 
Mceting-liouse where a large and attentive 
audience was present and in the afternoon 
we visited a young woman who is sick, and 
desired to be visited, and who expressed her 
willingness to renounce the world and all 
the sinful works of unrighteousness, and 
consecrate herself to the service of God in 
a solemn covenant with Christ. May God 
give her grace to remain steadfast iu her 
purpose. After spending a short time in 
religious conversation, singing and prayer 
with her, I went home with Bro. Daniel 







/ 


HIEIR^LID OIF TIRTCTTia:. 


Mm. 


Brenneman, stopping on our way a short [ 
time with Bro. William Moyer and Bro. 
Samuel Gochanauer. 

On Monday (Christmas day), we met at 
the New Meeting-house in Elkhart, where 
a large congregation had assembled, and 
where, according to previous appointment, 
the Lord's Supper was celebrated, of which 
a goodly number of brethren and sisters 
partook. We had a pleasant meeting and 
hope that all present may have been edified, 
encouraged and blessed thereby. 1 lie aft- 
ernoon 1 spent pleasantly with the brethren 
and sisters. 

The evening I spent at the house 01 “Broth- 
er Ilenry,” where several other brethren and 
sisters also were present and we spent the 
time very pleasantly in conversation, exhor- 
tation, singing and prayer. A young sister, 
who through ill health was prevented from 
attending the services in the forenoon, was 
also present and desired to partake of the 
bread and wine in commemoration of the 
dying love of Jesus. Her request w'as ac- 
cordingly granted and \vc enjoyed a season 
of refreshing unto our souls, and felt that 
it was good for us to be together there in 
the observance of the commandments of Je- 
sus. . 

After the service was concluded, I repaired 
to the 1 )epot, and at ten o’clock took the 
train for home. This was written before 
leaving Elkhart, and my trust is that God 
will bring me safely to my home and fami- 
ly again. 

Your humble brother and fellow-laborer 
in the vineyard of the Lord. 


ing into the fold, and realize the friendship 
of that best Friend Jesus. 

In the present year I shall put forth ev- 
cry effort to make the “ Children’s Depart- 
ment” interesting and instructive. May 
God help me, and put such thoughts into 
my mind as he would have me bring before 
the children. Will my old" friends who so 
kindly helped me the past year, help me al- 
so this year? Brother Henry. 

For the Herald of Truth. 


lie not Proud. 


Burr Oaf:, Midi. 


C. J). Bef.rv. 


Slpltir tn’s department. 

The New Year. 

Dear children, 1 wish you all a happy 
New Year. We have now commenced an- 
other year, but we do not know whether 
we shall see the end of it or not. A great 
many who lived at the beginning oflast year, 
did not live to sec the end of it. I know ol 
men, women, boys and girls, who died 
last year; and this year I may die, and an- 
other one will have to write the “Children s 
Department;” but I love God; 1 lore my 
dear Jesus, and 1 shall try, if God will help 
me, to he as good as 1 can. 1 will try to 
please him. ' 1 wish I could do good and 

please him every day. 

I hope the dear Lord will help me tins 
year, that 1 may do much good. 1 had 
many pleasant times with the children the 
last year, and talked with hundreds, yes 1 
believe 1 may say thousands of little folks. 
If I could see all the children to which 1 
talked, flocking to Jesus, it would can e me 
irreater joy than I can express with words. 

My last year’s work with the. children 
was very pleasant to me, and 1 pray and 
hope that God will bless all that was done, 
and grant that the lambs may come flock- 


Dear children, As I love you all most ^ 
dearly, anti wish to do all I possibly can to have ^ 
you please God, and to be happy, I wish you g 
all the same happiness that 1 wish to my- , 
self. Now if we wish to please God and do a 
what he wants us to do, and avoid the ( 
things that are the most displeasing in his } 
sight, we must learn to know what tlieso 
things are; so I will now tell you one of \ 
the things which God abhors. . A . 
thing that is so displeasing in his sight, . 
that those who have it in their hearts can ■ 
never get to that happy place in heaven, 
can never see him. This hateful thing is 
pride. 

In the November number of the Herald 
our friend “Mary.” gave you some very 
good advice, and also told you about some- 
thing that is also very displeasing to God. 

It pleased me very much, and I hope she 
will write some more such pieces. Telling 
lies and being proud are both very displeas- 
ing to God ; they are the first two things 
which Solomon mentions that God hates. lie 
says, “These six things doth the Lord hate; 
yea, seven arc an abomination unto him: A 
proud look , a lying tongue, and hands that 
seek innocent blood. A heart that devi- 
seth wicked imaginations, feet that be 
swift in running to mischief, a lalse witness 
that speaketh lies, and him that soweth dis- 
cord among brethren.” I’rov. G: 10 — 19. 

“Though the Lord be high, yet hath he 
respect unto the lowly; but the proud lie 
knoweth afar off.” V*. 138:6. “Every 
one that is proud in heart is an abomination 
to the Lord.” I’rov. 1G : 5. “A high look 
aud a proud heart, is sin.” Prov. 21 : 4. 
i “Hear ye, and give ear ; be not proud for 
the Lord hath spoken.” Jer. 13 : 15. 
i Now dear children, you see how God 

i hates the pTOild, now hear what will become 
| of them. “ God rosisteth the proud, but giv- 

eth grace to the humble.” Jas. 4 : G. “For 
, the day of the Lord of hosts shall be upon 
| every one that is proud and lofty, and upon 
, every one that is lifted up; and he shall be 
I brought low.” Isa. 2; 12. “For behold 
the day cometh, that shall burn like an ov- 
I on; and all the proud, yea, and all that do 
e wickedly, shall be stubble, aud the day that 
cometh shall burn them up, saith the Lord 

ii of hosts, that it shall leave them neither 
J root nor branch.” Mai. 4:1. 

. My dear little friends, do you think it is 
; 1 good to be proud? Do you think proud 


people are more thought of than those who 
are not proud? I think you will all with me, 
say No. Proud people are hateful, even to 
each other. There are very few who love 
them. And the worst of all is, God does 
not love them. 

I have seen persons act very proudly and 
hatefully, because they had fine clothes on, 
and thought they were pretty. I have 
seen young men and hoys hold up their 
heads very straight, and look very proud, 
and walk past common people without speak- 
ing to them, because they thought it look- 
ed big. Little boys and girls are often 
proud, when they get new clothes on. And 
not only little boys and girls, but grown 
persons are often so proud of themselves 
and their clothes, that when they go to 
meeting they seem to think of nothing else, 
and are continually looking at themselves 
or fixing something about their clothes, 
paying no attention to the minister at all. 

Now then, as we know that pride is su 
hateful to God, let us all pray to him and 
ask him to take all pride, and haughtiness, 
and unkindness from our hearts, and give 
us hearts of meekness and lowliness; for if 
we are not willing to have our hearts made 
pure and clean, have all pride and every- 
thing that is hateful to God, removed from 
us, we can never see him and that dear Je- 
sus, hut must stay in n place of darkness 
and misery with those who have been proud 
and disobedient to God. 

My dear little friends, will you be proud ' 
Will you be angry and hateful to your fa 
ther or mother because they do not get you 
such clothes as you want? such as proud 
people love to wear, because they think it 
makes them look pretty ? I also ask the 
young men and young women. Do you feel 
happy in following the fashions of a foolish, 
wicked world, and wear such clothes as 
your parents are bitterly opposed to ? l)o 
! you feel really happy and satisfied in your 
■ heart, when you go to meeting with your 
gay, fashionable clothes on and see your par 
i ents sitting up next to the minister, in mod 
! cst apparel, perhaps with tears in ther 
I eyes because they see you sitting back 
i among the unconverted and proud? Perhaps 
i their hearts are lifted up in prayer to God for I 
• you, that he may show you your folly in dis-l 
r obeying your parents and your God, and I 
bring you to see how foolishly and hatefullyl 
i you are acting in the sight of him who crc l 
e ated you? Can you answer in the affirmn 
•- tivo, and say you enjoy yourselves, and have 
r a clear and peaceful conscience, while thus 
n grieving your deal parents, who feel so muck 
n concern fur j r our welfare? Please think 


of these things, and consider well the things 
that will make you the happiests of God’s 
creatures in this world, and eternally happy 
tn the world to come. Please accept some 
<»ood advice from Brother Henry. 

O 

My son, forget not my law ; but let thinej 
heart keep my conmandments : for length 
of days, and long life, and peace, shall they 
add to thee. Prov. 3:1,2. 


IB 


1872 


E OP TRUTH. 


My Travels. 

I have not much to say about my travels 
this month. At the time I write this I am 
in Juniata county, Pa. I left home on the 
7th, and arrived here on the morning of 
the 9th of December. I meet many kind 
friends here with whom I enjoy myself well. 
By the time this Herald reaches its readers, 

I shall probably be visiting in Lancaster 
county 

If my little friends were net so far apart 
so that I could visit them all; O how glad I 
should be! But if I could hope to meet 
them all in “ that happy laud, far, faraway.” 
my heart would be so full of joy, that I 
would shout, and praise God with a loud 
voice. 

We arc now beginning a new year; 
let us all think how good our heavenly Fa- 
ther has been to us the last year ; let us 
be determined that if he will let us live 
this year we will love him, and try to 
obey and please him better than we did 
last year. 

Dear children, should we not be glad to 
have such a kind Father as this, and such 
a loving friend as Jesus? Should we not 
often ask him to come near to us and fill 
our hearts with love, and help us to tight 
against sin and wickedness, and become his 
children, and his friends, that we might 
live with him in that beautiful city, where 
all will be peace and joy, and happiness for 
ever? 

Before the end of this year, some of you. 
my little friends, aud perhaps I, may leave 
this world. Now let each of us think, if I 
should die this year, do I love the Lord 
with all my heart? Do I love Jesus? 
Have I been good and obedient, and do I 
feel that he loves me, and can I go to live 
with him if I should die? 

Will you all think of this, my dear little 
friends, and sing, 

Another year lias passed away, 

A new one has begun. 

And I, before ’tis ended, may 
My earthly race have run. 

0 Lord, do thou my strength increase, 
My heart create anew; 

That I may love, obey and please, 

My God and Savior true ? 

Brother Henry. 

^ » m 

From my little Friends. 

[The following of my little friends have 
written very pleasant and encouraging little 
letters to me. 0, how it cheers and gladdens 
my heart to hear such good news from 
j those I love.] 

Dear Brother Henry, I am a girl of thir- 
teen years of age and I have a brother al- 
most twelve years old; he reads with me 
every morning in the Testament, and every 
evening in the Bible. We have read the 


Testament through, and commenced in the | 
beginning again. 

1 think it is necessary for us all to make 
good use of our time while we are young ; 
we all know that we have done wrong, but 
we must try to do better for we may soon 
pass away, aand we cannot live our time 
ove gitfn ; hut if we try to do right while 
we live, we will not be afraid to die. 

“I take these little lambs, ” said he, 

And lay them in my breast ; 

** Protection they shall find in me, 

In me be ever blest.” 

Rebecca A. Siierk. John H. Siierk. 

Christiana Haas, of Washington, 111., 
says, ”1 am gettiug along. very well in read- 
ing my Testament. 

I read a chapter every day and some- 
times more than one. I have read the Ger- 
man Testament through three times, and 
the English, once, and will soon W through 
again. 

Dear Brother Henry, I have not forgot- 
ten the good advice you gave us when you 
were here, and I have often wishedjto seejyou 
again.” 

May God bless you, my dear little friend, 
and grant that wc may both love and obey 
him, that we may see each other again, in 
that beautiful home above. 

Mary Isabella King, ofMinonk, 111., says, 
« I still remember what you told my brother 
and me, aud I hope you have n#f forgotten 
us yet.” 


those who cannot read, wish to learn these 
verses each month, will their mothers, 
brothers or sisters please read them over for 
them a few times that they may learn them? 

Brother Henry. 


e- 

<? 



FOOD FOR THE LAMBS. 


Choose you this day whom 
ye will serve. Josh. 24 : 15. 

If any man serve me, let 
him follow me ; and where I 
am, there shall also my serv- 
ant he : if any man serve me, 
him will my Father honor. 
Jn. 12 : 26. 




My little friends who wish to read a chap- 
ter every day this year, can sec by the fol- 
lowing table, which chapter to read. On 
the first day of January we will all read the 
9th chapter of Luke, on the second day of 
J^muary, we will read the 1 Oth chapter of 
Luke, and so on, every day a chapter. 


l)»vs. Chapter. 


Jan. 

i 

Luke 

9 

it 

2 

it 

10 

it 

3 

u 

11 

a 

4 

tt 

12 

it 

5 

it 

13 

it 

6 

tt 

14 

a 

i 

a 

15 


Days. Chapter. 


Jan. 

21 

John 

5 

U 

22 

tt 

6 

(A 

23 

tt 

7 

it 

24 

tt 

8 

a 

25 

il 

9 

tt 

26 

a 

10 

tt 

27 

tt 

1 1 


She also says that her grandfather, and 
several of her little cousins died lately. 
May she meet them all with Jesus. Your 
love is heartily accepted. 

Jaeobine Kauffman, of the same place 
says, “I take the pleasure to write you a few 
j lilies to lot you know that I still remember 
I you. I wish you would come to sec us 
again. I hope you have not forgotten me.’ 

I have not forgotten you, dear little friend; 
I often thiuk of you, and pray for you. 
May the Lord bless you, and fill your heart 
j with love to him. I wish more of my little 
friends would write to me. I am always 
I triad for their friendly letters. 

O 


tt 

8 

it 

1G 

li 

28 

it 

T2 

it 

9 

ii 

17 

li 

29 

ii 

13 

it 

10 

a 

18 

ii 

30 

ii 

14 

(( 

1 1 

u 

19 

il 

31 

ii 

15 

a 

12 

tt 

20 

Feb. 

1 

ti 

16 

a 

13 


21 

ii 


it 

17 

a 

14 

ii 

22 

ii 

3 

a 

18 

tl* 

15 

a 

23 

1 (1 

4 

tt 

19 

a 

1G 

a 

24 

il 

5 

it 

20 

li 

1 7 

John 

1 

ii 

G 

it 

21 

tt 

18 

ii 

2 

ii 

i 

Acts 

1 

1/ 

19 

20 

ii 

3 

kt 

g 

li 

o 

a 

li 

4 

1 ii 

9 

ii 

3 


This table can he written on a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 


The Witness of the Heart. 


Search the Scriptures. 

\Ye shall continue to give the table for 
the children to read a chapter in the Test- 
. ament every day this year. I hope all who 
read a chapter last year will do so, or try al- 
go th:.' Year; and 1 also wish that many 
! others would join into read a chapter daily 
from God’s holy word. 1 wish that all who 
j rend a chapter every day last year would 
! send in their names and address. 

The “Food for the Lambs,” will also be 
I continued this year. This is intended for 
| the little children to learn by heart. If 


Christ said “ I am the truth.” Not, 
1 show you the truth; but, I am the 
truth. In Christ himself, known as 
a present reality, communed with 
as a friend, is the best answer to 
every disturbing question. There 
is possible for us a more perfect in- 
timacy with him than the disciple 
had who leaned upon his breast. 
\Ye may know him, not as a man 
who lived eighteen hundred years 
ago, hut as one directly present to 
our consciousness, llis promise, 
“ Lo, I am with you alway,” has a 





j 


OIF 1 TRUTH. 


1872 


HERALD OF THTJTH. 


fulfillment as overflowingly com- r 
plete as lias every Divine promise, y 
It is not merely that his power is t 
over us, his providence guiding us, 1 
but that be himself, in personal t 
presence, dwells within the heaits 
of his children. He is there even '< 
when our eyes are holden that we 
know him not! AVhen our imper- t 
feet faith cannot realize him, none < 
the less is he present. But more t 
than this, our eyes may be opened i 
to see him. We may rest our hearts j 
upon the heart ot our Lord. We < 
may walk in a sense of an encom- 
passing tenderness, and purity, and • 
unfathomable depth of good. We < 
may rest more peacefully than the 
babe on its mother’s bosom, in the 
love of our divine Lord. No words 
can convey what he is to those that 
know him. When language can | 
express human love, when it can | 
reveal the grace in which the man > 
or woman we love best appears to 
us, even then must it falter and 
prove too weak to tell what the 
heart feels when it looks upon its 
Redeemer. 

The atmosphere of love lies far 
above the region where mists and 
clouds of doubt prevail. When we 
know Christ, there is no problem 
of spiritual knowledge that can vex 
us. The questions, that distress 
those who are seeking their way, 
no longer concern those who rest at 
home. Men study with anxiety the 
evidences of Christianity; they dis- 
cuss whether the fact of miracles can 
be proven, and wherein a mira- 
cle consists; they argue upon the 
authenticity of particular books 
and passages of Scripture; - they 
painfully test every link in the chain 
of theological argument; all of 
which is natural, and has its value. 
But when the soul knows Christ, 
knows him as its familiar friend, 
as the most real and ever-present of 
realities, then it cares little for the 
witness of miracles. Let those seek 
a sign who are in doubt. Let those to 
whom Christ comes as a strangersc.ru- 
tinize his credentials; the children 
ask no credentials of their father. 

There are a multitude of questions 

concerning Christian doctrine, which 
at a certain stage seem to the mind 
of paramount importance, but when 
it has gained the inner heart of 
Christian life are felt to concern on- 
ly the external form. They may 
have a real value to those who are 
in need of symbol and adaptive 
statement. They may be as school- 


masters to bring us to Christ. But 
when we reach Christ himself, love 
becomes our teacher, and the teach- 
ings of love are very simple. The 
theologian perplexes himself as to 
how the Atonement reconciles God 
and man, but he who looks upon 
the cross itself asks no questions 
there. Good men tremble lest sci- 
ence contradict the Bible account of 
the creation; but when we feel be- 
neath us an omnipotent arm, and 
feel that by it all things in earth 
and heaven are swayed, we have no 
fears lest the Creator be dethroned, 
or lest he contradict himself. — 
Christian Union. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

The Hardened Hearts. 

Dear Savior wilt thou love impart, 

To us frail pilgrims here below? 

We feel our hearts are netting cold, 

While through this wilderness wo go. 

■ 

O, may our hearts turn dear to thee, 
And learn the goodness of thy love : 

That every idle thought may flee, 

In fears and coinflict from above. 

The power is thine that saves a soul, 
From dire perdition aud despair; 

Which gladly does the heart enclose, 
For such a comforting affair. 

Thy will, 0 gracious Lord be done; 

Not ours, so proud and map^ftfet: 


For thou art wise, and th/u art strong, 
Amd thou alone caustf us perfect. 

VAAJ^tzler. 


:ut 


On the 23rd of November, by Jacob N. Bru- 
bacher, Bro. Isauc G. Stauffer, of Dalipbin county, 
Pa., ami Sister Catharine S. Stauffer, of Lancaster 
coun t y. Pa. 

On the 19th of November, in Elkhart Ind., by 
Daniel Brenneinan, Bro. Christian N. Iloldeman , 
and Sister Harriet Gangway, both of the abo've 
mentioned place. 

May God enable them, like Zacharias andEliz- 
ftbeth of oil, to walk in all the commandments 
and ordinances of the Lord blameless. 

On the a 1st of November, at the. residence of 
the bride’s father, by J M Brenneinan, Bro. haac 
Habeyger, of Putnam county, Ohio, and Sister 
Rebecca Shank , of Allen county, Ohio. 

cb 

- v 

On the 11th of December, in the Bethel church, 

| in Mo nitea u county. Mo., Anna Iaih inbill aged til 
' years, months and 26 days. She suffered for 
some time of cancer, which also caused her death. 
She bore her severe nlllictions with patience and 
possessed the assurance of reconciliation with 
(Jod through the blood of Christ, and departed 
in the hope of eternal life. She was buried on 
the 12th at the Bethel church where P. P. Lehman* 
\ mid 0. Wclty preached appropriate discourses. 

I On the 20th of November, in St. Joseph county, 


lnd. of inflamation of the bowels, Nathan Kaser t 
aged’ 67 years, 2 months and 6 days. He was 
buried at Fore’s burying-ground. Funeral dis- 
course by J. Hildebrand and M. W. Shank from 
Rom. 10: 13. 

In AVestmoreland county, Pa., of scarlet fever, 
Martin Staffer, aged 2 years, 7 months and 10 days. 
Buried on the 17th of November. Funeral dig- 
courses by Jonas Blauch and John Ovciholt from 
the words: “Not dead but sleepeth.” 

Martin calmly fell asleep T _ 

And now from pain is free, 

His spirit’s gone to heaven 
And is waiting there for me. 

On the 4th of December, in Elkhart, county 
Ind., Augustus Pffciffer, aged Gl years, 11 months 
and 14 days. Funeral services by Jacob Beutler 
and Daniel Brennerrian, from proverbs 27 : 1. 

On the 30th of November, in Allen county, 
Ohio, Sister Elizabeth Burkholder, widow of Sam- 
uel Burkholder, aged 78 years, 1 month aud 15 
days. She was buried ou the 2nd of December, 
i„ the Mennonite grave-yard. Funeral discourses 
were delivered by the brethren C. Culp and J. M. 
Brenneinan, from 2nd Cor. 5:1. 

On the 25th of October, at his residence near 
Fairfield, Adams county, Pa., John Musselman , 
aged 61 years, 11 months and 13 days. The 
deceased was much beloved by all. He leaves a 
wife and 8 children to mourn their loss. 

On the 2Gth of November; in McLean county, 
111., of Consumption, Mary, daughter of Joseph 
Yoder aged 37 years, 10 months and 14 days. 
She \va:T a member of the Mennonite church. 
She bore her suffering with patience and hoped 
for a better life. On the 27th she was buried in 
Simon Lautz’ burying-place followed to the grave 
by a large concourse of relatives and friends, 
upon which occassion a discourse was dedivered 
by J. Stuckey from Ps. 90: 2—5 and Eccl. 12: 
3—8. 

On the 22nd of September, in Livingston comi- 
ty, 111., of dropsy and old age, Bartholomew Zook, 
aged 83 years, 6 mouths and 1 day. He was 
buried on the 24th. Funeral discourses were 
delivered by Christian Rupp, of McLean county, 
Christian Schlegel and John P. Schmitt, from 
1 Cor. 15. 

On the 24th of November, in Upper Salford 
township, Montgomery county, Pa., of an inter- 
nal disease, Henry , son of Isaac Landis, aged 24 
years, 5 months and 24 days. Buried on the 
26th, at Franconia. Funeral discourses by Hen- 
ry S. Bower and Jacob Landis. 

On the 27th of November, in Franconia town- 
ship, Montgomery county. Pa., of the infirmities 
of old ago, Bro. Rudolph Moyer , aged 86 years, 
7 months aud 12 days. He was buried at Fran- 
conia on the 30th. Funeral discourses by Abm. 
Moyer, and Isaac Moyer. The deceased lived 
in the bonds of matrimony 64 years, and was the 
father of 7 children (4 sons and 3 daughters), of 
whom one son died several years ago. He leaves 
an aged widow to mourn her loss. [The above 
was my aged Uncle with whom I spent a few 
hours during my visit in that vicinity in October, 
and was much encouraged by the earnest desire 
of this aged brother and sister, after those heav- 
enly treasures which never perish. Now the 
aged brother is gone to his reward, and the dear 
old Aunt perhaps will not tarry long. May God 
give her grace even to the end, and in heaven 
they shall meet again. — Editor . ] 

(in the 6th of November, 1871, in Montgomery 
county, Ohio, Sister Susanna Kendrick, aged 71 
! years, 2 months and 20 days. Her complaint was 
• heart disease. Sbe was complaining for soiiu' 
time and bore her afflictions very patiently utile 
1 her end Site was still able to he about. In tho 
i evening she took her supper as usual and by '■» 
1 o’clock" kb'-* was a c< rpse. She leaves an aged 
i husband and 7 children (8 sons and 4 daughters). 
i- am i many friends to mourn her departure and 1 
hope through death she has gained that heavenly 
, rest which is prepared for all that love Jesus and 


obey him. On the 8th she was buried, on which dy with great violence returned and terminated 
occasion remarks were made by the writer from his earthly career. As a citizen he was much 
Heb. 9 : 27, 28. J. M. Greider. esteemed, lie had been a member of the church 

On the 11th of December, 1871, near Cross for many years, — was always punctual in the 
Key’s, Rockingham county, Virginia, sister Eliz- discharge of his obligations, enjoying the coni- 
abeth Beery, wife of Bro. Joseph Beery, aged forts of the religion which he professed, as well 
00 years, 5 months and 6 days. She was buried in the diversified relations of life as in the 
on the 13th at the Mill Creek (Tuuker) Meeting- solemn and trying hour of death. By his death 
bouse, where a funeral discourse was delivered his children lose a kind and affectionate father 
by preachers Jacob Hildebrand and John Ev«s, and the community a highly esteemed citizen, 
from l~Thess. 4 : 13 — 18. Her disease was in- ■ ■ 

Carnation of the bowels. ' , ' 

On the 17th of September, in Pretty Prairie, 4fj f f 

Lagrange county, lnd., Mary, wife of Christian £** 

Plank, aged 35 years, 6 months and 28 days. 2 

She was a member of the Omish Mennonite 

church. She was an industrious and god-fcar- Peter Scliraek, John Bi sic r, Henry Yotber, J 
iug mother, bere her affliction with patience, and k Hartzler, C Natziger, L J Miller, H B Weiz, 
prayed that God might receive her soul and that Joseph Stuckey, Magdalena Miller, Peter Ziegler, 
she might die happy. lVhen asked, she always 8 H Sheppard M D, David Witmer, L O Hart- 
expressed herself willing to depart from this man, John P King, John S Good, Benj Eichcr, 
world and exhorted the people to pray. She was S 1 oder, Adam Mummert, Tobias A Miller Sam- 
sick ten days. She leaves a husband and 9 chil- uel Yoder, J Deidler, \\ m Gable, John Iloldeman, 
dren to mourn their loss, but we hope their loss Abm Stemen, Isaac Schmucker, 11 1! Brenneinan, 
is her eternal gain. She was buried on the 18tli, C P Liven good, Benj llemberger, J G Cox, JJ 
followed to the grave by a large concourse of Shrock, < G \\ incy, David D 1 oder, S l’anabeck- 
friends and relatives, on which occasion funeral cr > Natziger, 1 1> Snyder, Moses Lrennenian, 
discourses were delivered by Jonas Yoder and U 1 Detweiler, John P Hershey, Abner 1 Zook, 
Christian Worry from 1 Tim. 4 : 7, 8, in German, Lliz Rhodes, Henry Good, Mary Kessler, J L 
and bv C. D. Beery and Geo. Long from Ju. 5: Springer, Cbr Sehlotter, Benj Brackbill, Dr J 1) 


grave by a large concourse of Shrock, ( G Wincy, David D 1 odor, S i’anabeck- 
tivos, on which occasion funeral er, Chr Nafziger, 1 B Snyder, Moses Breimoman, 
delivered by Jonas Yoder and G 1' Detweiler, John P Hershey, Abner \ Zook, 


and by C. D. Beery and Geo. Long from Jn. 5: j 
24, 25, in English. 

“We loved her, yes no tongue can toll 
How much wc loved her or how well; 

God loved her too and lie thought best, 

To take her home with him to rest.” 

C. Naeziger. 

On the 10th of December, in Leecourity, Iowa, 
John Miller, aged 71 years. He was buried on 


Weaver, Sam li Erb, l lrieh liege, John Baer’s 
sons, Jac F Natziger, J 11 Landis, A Zebr, J B 
Snyder, Ann Detweiler, Jonas D Troyer, Chr 
Newcomer, Henry Myers, please send the name of 
your P 0 and State. JohnLatshaw, J L Moyer, 
F A ltodes. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — J C Amslutz $1 ; J U Amstutz $1 : II F 


the llfh. Funeral discourses were preached by Andrews COots ; Joseph Ackerman $3 CO. 
the brethren Schuntz and llirscliler. lie leaves B — A Burkholder 5 (lets . J L Brubaker $1 20 ; 
a wife and 10 children. lie was a member ol !I B Burkholder 50cts ; Christian Brand $1 10; 
the Omish Mennonite church for many years. Samuel Plough 25c ts ; Sam Hough •‘>'2 10 ; Justus 
On the 14th of December, after an illness of Bare 7 Sets ; Catharine Blosser $1 60 ; Peter Ba- 
about 8 days, Bro. David Kreider, Sen., of Lcba- singer $1 ; Peter Kucher $2 ; Ulrich Basinger 
non county, l J a., aged G8 years, 1 month and 28 SI 60 ; Joseph B Berger, SI ; Henry S Bower 
days. On Sunday the 17th his mortal remains $1 ; Joseph S Baer S2 : Joseph Beidler 25cts ; 
were followed to the silent grave by a bereft wid- John K Boiler GOcts ;‘Geo Brand $1 : Jacob Bow 
ow, ten children and a largo concourse of rela- man $1 70 ; Win Buzzard $*1 75 ; 1 M Brenne- 
tives and friends, on which occasion a funeral man $2 ; 11 II Blauch GOcts ; S II Rally 7<>ets ; 
discourse was delivered by Bro. Jacob Dobner .1 B Blosser Diets : If K UrubaKor Si GO ; A M 
aud the writer, from Luke 2 : 2J — 32. Buried at Blosser 8 I 50 ; II S Blauch sen $4; John K Bru- 
Spring Creek Meeting-house. Bro. Kreidercon- baker SI : Jac Brenneinan GOcts; Sam Bally 
secrated the evening of his life chietiy to the 70ets ; J N Brubaker; SI 25; Jos Brubaker S3; 
service of God and the dissemination of gospel Henry Brubaker $7 ; David Baer SI 40. 
truth. He distributed a great many pamphlets, C — Jacob Culp 75cts : Croz A Woodard 35ots ; 

“Pride and Humility” and Family Almanacs, also lames Coyle $1 ; A B Clemmer S2 ; Anna Coble 


the Herald of Truth he introduced liberally. 

.Jacob N. Brubaker. 


$150. 

1) . iPD Biller Si : Adam Biller t j ji -j- Chr Def - 


On Sunday November the 20th, 1871, at the fenbaugh 2 Sets ; Jacob Biller $8 ‘JO ; Samuel 
residence of his son-in-law, 'Jonathan Gaily, in Detweiler 70cts. 

German township, Fayette county*, l’a., Bro. Ja- E — Joseph Eshlcmnn $*1 25 ; Barbara Kslile- 

cob Johnson, at the advanced age of 81 years, 11 man $2 50 ; A Eby S3 ; Elias Eby S2 ; Joseph 
months and 3 days. His remains were followed, Engel S2 23 ; Jacob Lin esman $1 10. 
on the next day, by a large concourse of relatives F — Klaus II Fisher $2 60 ; Harvey Fricsiier 

and friends, to the family burying-ground, on the .>{,•1 ; D L Ferry 25cts. 

old homestead farm, and the funeral services G — Joel Good SI 20; M Good 1 GO: ('hr Goi- 
were held, at the house (f his son, Joseph, near ger Si ; J G Geiger $1 ; Fred Geiger $1 ; Flizo- 
the burying-ground, by Elder Joseph C. Cover belli Good SI : M Gnsliuw 1 Jets : Jos Goldschmidt 
and David Johnson. The subject selected by $14 85: Eliz Good 30cts ; J 8 Good $2.; PS Gin- 
Elder Cover for the occasion, was the latter clause gerich $2 ; Abrui Good $3 ; J M Greidor $11. 
of the 45 th verse of the 15th chapter of 1 Cor. II — Jacob Ha beck or 20ets ; Benj Hilly $1 ; Alex 
After the sermon, David Johnson made some ad- llirshbronnen Si : W Iloldeman $1 70: Anna 
ditional remarks appropriate to t lie occasion. Dossier 12cts ; U. Ilerlzler $1 50: II Hildebrand 


Though Bro. Jacob Johnson had been affected 


II Ileutwolo 20cts ; A Hartman S3 60 ; .1 L 


for several years past, periodically, yet, between Huver Si : Z If lleindel S3 ; S M Ilerlzler S2 
the attack* of the complaint, lie enjoyed a tole ra- 50 ; Jacob Bolter 05 : \ntia Horst S7 50 ; 1) It 
Me degree of health for a man of his ago, and Hoover if I 60 : J P Herr $2 80; J M Herr 1 Oct s: 
spent much of his time in visiting amongst bis Levi llort 37cts ; I* F ILisbey SI ; Ulrich 
children and relatives. On Tuesday previous llert/.b r 2 Jets, 
to his deceaso, he returned from a visit to his 1 — C Imholl' $6 20. 

daughter, Mrs Sarah Reist, near Connellsville, J— Nicholas Johnson Si 40; Jos Johnson ol 

and also his son Joseph's and on the next day Jac 75c(s ; Malt John $1 ; Nidi Johnson $23 ; 
accompanied by his son Joseph, he arrived at Nich Johnson $J. 

Jonathan Galley’s, his son-in-law when towards K — Josiah Kohli GOcts ; Philip It Kilmer $1 ; 

the latter part of the week, his periodical main- Jacob F Front $2 ; C Kratz $1 60 ; A Knopp $1; 


Jos Johnson ot 


S B Kennga $2 10 ; David Kauffman iOcts ; S S 
King $5 ; John H Keagy .$3 25 ; C S Keller $2 
G5 ; Jos Kulp 50cts ; Chr Kepperling $1 ; J Kauff- 
man 70cts ; Amanda Koppes $1 10 ; Josh Kauff- 
man $1 50. 

L — Elijah Longaere $G ; I C Lehman $1 ; John 
I.oueks CUcts ; E Lugebiehl $1 ; DC Lugebiehl 
SI ; John C Lehman $5 25 ; Frederick Landis 
$1 ; 1) Lechlitner Si 50 ; Martha Long 35cts ; 
Joseph Lantz $2 ; Benjamin Lapp $2 60 ; A B 
Lehman Si 50; W J Leatherman $183 ; John 
Lehman $5 ; Chr Lantz $2 10 ; C C Lehman $1 ; 
John Leatherman 30cts ; A S Lehman $4 ; D II 
Latshaw $i 10 ; John Lapp $2 ; C P Liven- 
good $5. 

M — Levi I) Miller $2 60 ; Abm Means $1 50 ; 
D B Myers SI 50 ; Jacob Moyer $2 ; A A Miner 
25cts ; Alpheus Moyer $1 ; Jos M Miller $2 ; 
Jacob Mast $1 ; Wm McF.lbenny $1 ; Jonas Mu- 
ma Jr $2 : C F Martin $2 50 ; Sam Metzler $1 
50; J M Metzler $1 60 ; B F Miller $1 50; 

J Miller 13cts; E Musselman .$‘1 25; Jac L Moy- 
er Si 25 ; David Martin $*1 50. 

N — Walilus Natziger 20cts ; Jacob F Nufziger 
Si 50 ; John Nusbaurn $1 ; B F Newcomer $2 
50 ; Peter Nissley $3 GO ; Waldus Nafziger 20ctu; 
Cbr Newhauser $1 GO. 1 

O— A O Overholt $1 40 ; Jacob Overholzer 
$3 10. 

P — John Blank $1. 

It — S U Bosenberger $1 ; A C Risser $1 ; Mo- 
ses F Reist 95cts ; W B Itittenkouge 70cts ; N 
Roth S2 ; E B Riehl 12cts ; Isaac Reist $1 ; 
John Richer $1 75 ; S G Rosenberger IOcts ; Jo- 
seph Rich 20cts ; Benj Rohrer $1 ; J K Rank 
$4 ; Sam Reesor $9 25. 

S — F Swavtzentruber $2 ; Chr Stoner $1 90 ; 
Samuel Spiegel $2 ; Noah Shank IOcts ; Josiah 
j Suavely S3 ; C Steiner $2 ; C P Steiner $1 50 ; 
i Chr Sutter $1 ; John Shank $1 50 ; Susanna 
Scchrist $1 ; Joseph D Schneck IOcts ; Eli 
; Selirock 35cts ; David Sharer $1 40 ; U S Strick- 
lor $1 ; Jacob Suavely $1 ; J B Stoltzfus 75cts ; 
Daniel Sommer $2 ; P L Snyder $2 ; David M 
Stauffer $2 40 ; George Shenk $5 ; Christian 
Stuckey $1 25 ; C J Swart zeutruber 2 nets ; Eli- 
jah Stover $1 50 ; Annie Stauffer $1 ; Chr 
Schneck GOcts ; J II Sollenberger $1 22 ; Martin 
Sengcr $5 ; Reuben Strickler $1 ; PC Steiner 
SI GO ; Jacob Steiner $3 50; John Springer $1 ; 
Peter Schl ock sen $7 ; J B Snyder $8 ; Sam 
I Schlabach IOcts; John Smith $2 20 ; Fanny 
j Strolim $1 10 ; Christian Sehlotter TOcts ; An- 
drew Snoke $1 50 ; Peter Stauffer $2 05 ; E M 
Shelleiiberger $5 60 ; J Shoenbeck Si 10 ; D 
Sommer GOcts : D Smoker .$1 60 ; John Snyder 
$ l ; E C Stulzinan $1 60 ; Gid Stultzlus 26cts ; 

| jac 8hnmn IOcts ; A .1 Scherif»20cts ; John Schell 
- 1 : Pet er Schaiil z $8 80. 

T — Geo B Thomas $3 70 : Jolin S Thut $2 20 ; 

; Geo B Thomas 35c ts. 

, \Y — Abrm Weaver $3 ; John Welty $2 60; D 
Weaver SI 85 ; .1 Weaver 15cts ; George Witmer 
$1 10; Jacob Welty $ I ; Henry Walter $1 80; 
Sol Wise IOcts ; J G Wenger $2 60 ; Susan Wen- 
ger SOcts. 

y Jacob N Yoder $1 50 ; David 0 Yoder $1 

10 ; (' C Yoder $7 60 ; Jacob Yoder $1 15; Peter 
Yordy $1 ; SB Yoder 75cts ; R Yoder $1 ; l N 
Yother $5 ; J S Yoder 32cts ; Dan Yoder $1 60. 

Z — Peter Zirgler $1 10 ; Levi Zook 75cts ; 
Peter Zehr $1 : (’hr Zehr $3 25 ; C K Zook $1 ; 
T Zook $1 : .1 If Zook & Co $1 40. 

For Books. — Christian Stoner $6 50 : J B 
• j Gcrig $12 70 : J B Stoltzfus $12 ; 4 Mast sen 
. | S3; (hr Summers $3 : I D M iller $ 1 41 ; J a cob \ o - 
i ,|, .mi ; Benj B lough $3 ; David Martin $1 75 ; 
D im Kuitz s-5ii(i; Chr Ifreniieiimn 5l)ctn ; Ahrni 
(Died 3160; 15 Bow man $2 : Abram Gingrich 
| "dels ; F Sulci' 85 ; David S Miller $1 ; Samuel 
! | Gmugei ieb -IS 50; Samuel Mast $7 20; Mar- 
Alia l.ong $ I 611 ; John Nuswangev $ l 50 : Cbris- 
1 linn Xliller s;l2 50; M Shank. $8 35 ; C N Gerber 
; $13 17: P.-tcr Haller $5 75 ; P P Hershberger 

; .$15 'JO ; C Z Yoder $G 55. 


HEE-ALD OF TRUTH. 


Ian. 


TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passenger and freight trains on and after Oct. 
1st, 1871, leave Elkhart as follows: 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) 11,20, a. m. 

Toledo Accom., Mail (Air Line,) 12,55, r. m. 

Special New York Expr., (Main Line) 1,10, 

Atlantic Express, (Air Line) 9,55, “ “ 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 1,10 a. m 

FltKlGHT. 

Air Line.— f»: 20, 6: 35, a. m., and 0:15 p. m. 

Old Line. — 0: 25 a. m., and 10: 00 r. m. 

GOINO WEST. 

Special Chicago Express (Main Line,) 3,35 p.m. 
Night Express, (Main Line) 2,40 a.m. 

Pacific Express, (Air Line,) 4,30 a. m. 

Accommodation 3,4o P. M. 

fhkigiit. 

1 : 05, 3: 50, 10: 10 a. m., and 9: 00 r. m. 

Trains for Detroit for the Great Western Rail- 
way leave Elkhart as follows : 

Express, 1,10, p. m. 

Night-Express, 1,10, a. m. 

All trains run on Cleveland time which 
is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time, 
jggy Sleeping cars on all night trains, 
giifjy" Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. q p Hatch, Gen. Supt. 

S. D. Bancroft, Agent, Elkhart. 

Books for sale at this office. 

The following books are sent by mail, postage 
prepaid. 

The English Mknnonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery, 

at the following price : 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid M 

Per dozen, “ “ “ ^ $6 00 

“ “ sent by express at purchasers 

expense ----- 5 00 

Pocket edition, 76 

The German Spelling Book, a work of 160 
pages adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those ’who wish to study the German language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. - - - ~ 6 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers ex- 
pense ----- $-50 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 
on application. 

We have yet a small number ot the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for 75 cents. 

German Catechism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapt ed to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. We hope to be able also 
soon to publish one in English. 

The little Catechism may bo had at our olhce, 
at. the following prices : . , 4 A on 

Single copies, per mail, post age prepaid, $ O -0 
Per dozen, “ “ “ * 

“ hundred, by express, - - 1- ou 


Angenehme Stunden in Zion. I he little Book, 

‘ ngetiehme Stunden in Aion . written by Uliich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates : 

Per single copy, postage prepaid, - $0 10 

“ dozen, “ “ u - 1 00 

“ hundred, by express, at purchasers’ 

expense, - - - ' ■ -7 50 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
anguage.w orthy of being read by all. 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. Walker, D. D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War,\n the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Price, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of rride and Humility, Eng. 
and Gcr. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 
Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen 75 cts. 

Freemasonry. An essay showing its inconsist- 
ency with Christianity. A pamphlet of 48 pages, 
8vo. Price, 25cts. 

English Mennonite Hymn Book, $ .60 

Conversation on Saving Faith, 1 .75 

(Confession of Faith,) English / 

« “ German .60 

English-German Testaments -75 

German Bibles, small size 1.00 

English Bibles “ “ 1.60 

German Testaments, small size .20 

«« “ large size, with clasps 1.50 

>t u with notes 2.00 

English Testaments, small size .15 to .50 

it “ large size .40 to .60 

Dymond on War .60 

Should Christians Fight? .10 

Peace Manual -56 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2.00 

• i “ “ “ German, 1.65 

American Tract Trimer, Eng. or Ger. .40 

German and English Primer .45 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. .26 

Bible Text Book .45 

Bible Reader’s Help .40 

Alphabetical Index to the New Testament .25 
Ahn’s German Grammar 1.25 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklserung 1.60 

Oehlschlagers Eng & Ger Dictionary, 1 70 

Adlers “ “ “ 2 80 

AdierB large “ “ “ by express 7 00 

Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 1 75 

Wcbsters Dictionaries, 75, 90, 1 20, 1 45 & 2 50 


Ilabermans German Prayer Book 
“ English “ “ 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 
“ *• “ German 

En lish Testaments with notes 
** “ “ Psalms 

German “ “ “ 

Dictionary of the Bible, by express 
“ “ “ Illustrated 

Pilgrims Progress, English or Germnn 
History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 
Huebners Bible History, English 
Fleetwoods Life of Christ 
Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 
Menno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 
Unpart eiischcs Gesangbuch, with clasps 
Gcmeinschaftliche Lieder-Sammlung 
(men nonit inches Liederbuch) 

Unpart eiische Lieder-Sammlung 
(amisches Liederbuch) 

Spiegel der Taufe (Ger.) 


Ernsthafte Christenpflicht 65 

Johann Arnd’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arnd’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradies Gaertlein, &c. 3.50 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 25 

Bibles, 1 60, 2 00, 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 

per volume by express 4.00 

Health, or how to live 1.25 

Brown’s Pocket Concordance 60 

Mind and Words of Jesus 60 

Morning and Night Watches 60 

The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or German, by express 3.75 

For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each year bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.65 
The three years together in one volume, 
by express $3.50, by mail $4.00. 


MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 
Funk’s sons. 

Price per single copy, Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

a a “ “-—-prepaid • 14.50 

THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush and Kieffer. 

Price per single copy, postage prepaid, $0.60 
“ “ doz. 6.00 

THE CHRISTIAN HARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 35 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Music. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, $2.75. 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnsonls system for 
learning to read music is unsurpasseuby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $12. 
ggy” Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, we will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices- 


tijcralb of (T rutb. 

A Religions Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK &. Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $1,00 a year in 
either language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

r AY. ABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Persons subscribing should be particular 
state whether they wisti the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies sent free. 
Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

Elkhart Ind. 


Mennonite Book Storo, Book and Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 



“now beautiful are the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.” 


Vol. 9-No. 2. 


ELKHART, INDIANA, FEBRUARY 1872. 


Whole No. 98. 


For the Ileralil of Truth. 


Salvation extended to All. 


“If life was a portion 
That money could buy, 

The rich would all live 
And the poor would all die.” 

But life everlasting 
Oui^ Jesus doth give, 

To rich and to poor, 

And to all that believe. 

Awake then, ye sleepers, 

Arise from the dead, 

And ye shall have light, 

And that lifegiving bread. 

O come now, ye sinners, 

Ye wretched and blind, 

To Jesus draw near, 

And sweet life ye shall find. 

To that living fountain 
Come now and partake, 

Yes, haste ye and come, 

It may soon be too late. J. M. B 


For the Uerald of Truth. 

What Jesns has Commanded, and also 
What he has Forbidden. 


“This is my beloved Son, in whom I am 
well pleased ; hear ye him,” Matt. 17 : 5. 

In the following, will be observed the 
principal points, which Jesus commanded 
and also what he forbade. He says, “Ye 
are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I com- 
mand you,” JN. 15 : 14; and, “If ye love 
me, keep my commandments,” 14 : 15. 

His first command was, “Repent ye and 
believe the gospel,” “Let your light so shine 
before men, that they may see your good 
works, and glorify your Father which is in 
heaven,” matt. 5 : 10; “Therefore if 

thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there 
rememberest that thy brother hath aught 
against thee ; leave there thy gift before 
the altar and go thy way ; first be reconcil- 
ed to thy brother, and then come and offer 
thy gift. Agree with thine adversary quick- 
ly, while thou art in the way with him,” 
23-25. “If thy right eye offend thee, pluck 
it out, and cast it from thee.” “If thy right 
hand offend thee cut it off, and cast it from 
thee,” &c., 20, 30 ; matt. 18 : 8, 9; mark 
9 : 43 . 47 . 11 But 1 say unto you, fjlwear not 

at all; neither by heaven ; for it is God’s 
throne ; nor by the earth ; for it is hia foot- 


stool : neither by Jerusalem ; for it is the city 
of the great King : neither shalt thou swear 
by thy head because thou canst not make 
one hair white or black : but let your com- 
munication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for 

whatsoever is more than these cometh of 
evil,” matt. 5 : 34-37. “But I say unto you 
that ye resist not evil ; but whosoever shall 
smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him 
the other also. And if any man will sue 
thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let 
him have thy cloak also; and whosoever 
shall compel thee to go a mile, go with 
him twain. Give to him that asketh thee, 
and from him that would borrow of thee 
turn not thou away,” 39-42. “Of him 
that taketli away thy goods ask them not 
again,” LUKE 5 : 30. “Bless them that 
curse you, and pray for them which despite- 
fully use you,” “Love your enemies, and do 
good, and lend, hoping for nothing again,,’ 
0 : 35. 

“Be ye therefore perfect, even as your 
Father which is in Heaven is perfect,” MATT. 
5 : 48. “Be ye therefore merciful, as your 
Father also is merciful,” LUKE 6 : 36 
“Take heed that you do not your alms be- 
fore men, to be seeu of them, * * * ; wheu 
thou doest thine alms, do not sound a trum- 
pet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the 
synagogues and in the streets, that they 
may have glory of men ; * * * but wheu 
thou doest thine alms, let not thy left hand 
know what thy right hand doeth ; that thine 
alms may bo iu secret,” &c., matt. 6 : 1-3 

“ Sell that ye have, and give alms, ” 

luke 12 : 33. 

“When thou prayest, thou shalt not be as 
the hypocrites are; for they pray standing 
in the synagogues and in the corners of the 
I streets that they may he seen of men, * * *. 

' But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy 
[ closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, 
i pray to thy Father which is in secret, * * *■ 

1 But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, 

! as the heathen do ; for they thiuk that they 
shall be heard for their much speaking; be 
Dot. ye therefore like unto them, * * *. 
After this manner therefore pray ye : Our 

Father which art iu heaven, Hallowed be 
j thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will 
be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give 
us this day our daily bread. And forgive 
us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. 
And lead us not into temptation, but deliv- 
er U 9 from evil : For thine is the kingdom. 


and the power, and the glory, forever. 
Amen.” matt. 6 : 5-13. 

“And when ye stand praying, forgive, if 
ye have aught against any,” mark 11 : 25. 

“He spake a parable unto them to this 
end, that men ought always to pray, and 
not to faint,” luke 18 : 1. Watch ye there- 
fore, and pray always,” 21 : 36. “Ask, and 
and it shall be given you ; seek, and ye 
shall find ; knock, and it shall be opened 
unto you,” matt. 7 : 7 . Therefore 1 say 
unto you, What things soever ye desire 
when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, 
and ye shall have them,” mark 11:24. 
“Watch and pray, that ye fall net into temp- 
tation,” matt. 26:41. “God is a Spirit; 
and they that worship him, must worship 
him in spirit and in truth,” jn. 4 : 24. “When 
ye fast, be not as the hypocrites, of a sad 
countenance ; * * *. But thou, when thou 
fusteth, anoint thine head, and wash thy 
face,” matt. 6 : 16, 17. “Lay not up for 
yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth 
and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves 
break through and steal ; but lay up for 
yourselves treasures in heaven,” 19, 20. 
“Provide yourselves bags which wax not old, 
a treasure in the heavens that faileth not,” 
luke 12 : 33. “If thou wilt be perfect, go 
sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, 
and thou shalt have treasure in heaven,” 
matt. 19 : 21. “And I say unto you, Make 
to yourselves friends of the mammon of 
unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may 
receive you into everlasting habitations,” 
luke 16:9. 

“Take no thought for your life ; what ye 
shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet 
for your body, what ye shall put on, * * *. 
Behold the low's of the air ; * * *. Con- 
sider the lilies of the field how they grow. 
* * Therefore take no thought, saying, 
What shall we eat ? or, What shall we drink ? 
or, Wherewithal shall we bo clothed ? matt. 
0:25,26,28,31. Seek yo first the king- 
dom of God, and his righteousness, and all 
these things shall be added unto you ; take 
therefore no thought for the morrow,” Ac., 
33, 34. 

“Judge not, and yo shall not be judged; 
condemn not, and ye shall not be condemn- 
ed : forgive, and ye shall be forgiven ; give 
and it shall be given unto you,” luke 6 : 

37, 38. . 

First cast out the beam out of thine own 
eve ; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast 


HKBAUD OIF TRUTH. 


, at the mote out of thy brother’s eye. Give 19:9. “Jesus said, Thou bhalt do no mur- ho took bread, and gave thanks, and brake 
not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither der, Thou shult not commit adultery, Thou it, and gave unto them .saying, This is my 
cast ye your pearls before swine,” MATT, sh alt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false body which is given for you : This (Jo in re- 

_ * » *. . .1 n A 1 .1 il 11 t r T !i .1.. il 


LUKE 13 : 24. 


straight 


are great exercise authority, upon them; Lord and Master, have washed your feet ; 


“Beware of false prophets, which eome to but it shall not be so among you ; but who- ye also ought to wash one another’s feet; for 
u in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they soever will be great among you, let him be I have given you an example that ye should 
e ravening wolves; ye shall know them your minister; and whosoever will be chief do as T have done to you,” jn. 13 : 14, 15 


mercy, and not sacrifice ; for 1 am not come with all thy mind. This is the first and thy sword into his place; for all they that 
to call the righteous, but sinners to repent- great commandment, and the second is like take the sword, shall perish with the sword,” 
anee,” matt. 9 : 13. “Pray ye therefore the ' unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy- matt, 26 : 51 . Thus it is written, and thus 
lord of the harvest, that he will send forth ] self. On these two commandments hang it behooved Christ to suffer, and to rise 
laborers into his harvest,” matt. 9:38. ! all the law and the prophets,” matt. 22 : from the dead the third day; and that vc- 

“Behold, 1 send you forth as sheep in the [ 37-40. peutance and remission of sins should be 

midst of wolves; be ye therefore wise as “Be ye not called llabbi, for one is your preached in his name among all nations he- 
serpents, and harmless as doves. But bo- Master, even Christ ; and all ye are brethren, ginning at Jerusalem,” LUKE 24 : 46, 47. 
ware of men; for they will deliver you up and call no man your fattier upon the earth ; “AH power is given unto me in heaven 
to the councils,” matt. 10 : 16,17. “When for one is your Father, which is in heaven, and in earth. Go ye therefore and teach 
they persecute you iu this city, flee ye into Xeither be ye called masters ; for one is n 11 nations, baptizing them in the name ot 
another,” 28. “Fear not them which kill your Master, even Christ. But he that is the Father, and of the Son anu of the 
the body, but are not able to kill the soul ; greatest among you, shall be your servant,” Holy Ghost; teaching them to observe all 
but rather fear him which is able to destroy MATT. 23 : 8-1 1. “Cleanse first that which things whatsoever 1 have commanded you, and 
both soul and body iu hell,” 28. “Yea, I 1 it within the cup aud platter, that the out- lo, I am with you alway, even to the end of the 
say unto you, Fear him,” LUKE 12 : 5. side may be clean also,” 26v. “Watch world,” matt. 28 : 18-20. “Go ye into all 

“Come unto me, all ye that labor and j therefore, for ye know not what hour your the world, and preach the Gospel to even- 
are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. | Lord doth come**; therefore be ye also creature. He that believeth, and- is bap- 
Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me ; ready,” matt. 24 : 42, 44. tized shall be saved ; but he that believeth 

for I am meek and lowly in heart; and ye “Take heed lest any man deceive you,” not shall be damned,” mark 16 : 15, 16. 
shall find rest unto your souls ; for my yoke mark 13 : 5, “Learn a parable of the fig- “When ye shall h ive done all those 
is easy, and my burden is light,” matt. 11: tree,” 28. “Watch and pray ; for ye know things which arc commanded you, say, We 
28-30. 1 not when the time is.” 33. “What Isay are unprofitable servants, wq have done that 

“If any man will come after me, let him | unto you, I say unto all. Watch,” 37. “Let which was our duty to do,” LUKE 17:10. 
deny himself, aud take up his cross daily, your loius be girded about, and your lights “I f ye love me, keep my commandments,” 
and follow me,” luke 9:23. “Take heed I burning; and ye yourselves like unto men jn. 14:15. “Abide in me,” 15 : 4. “Cuu- 
that ye despise not one of these little ones,” i dint wait for their Lord,” luke 12 : 35, 36. j tinue ye in my love,” 15 : 9. 

matt. 18:10. “Moreover if thy brother i “Remember Lot’s wile,” luke 1 7 : 32. j There are now about one huudred com- 

shall trespass against thee, go and tell him I “In your patience possess ye your souls,” mauds and rules here enumerated, inclu 
his fault between thee and him alone; if i luke 21 : 19. “Take heed to yourselves, ding those which the apostles have given, 
he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy | lest at any time your hearts be overcharged that we arc to receive as the commandments 
brother ; but if he will not hear thee, then with surfeiting and drunkenness,” &c., 34. of the Lord, according £o 1 cor. 14 : 37. 
take with thee one or two more, that in the “Take heed and beware of covetousness,” Jesus says, “If yc continue iu my word, 
mouth of two or three witnesses every word luke 12 : 15. then arc y e my disciples indeed,” jn. 8: 

may be established ; and if he shall neglect j “When thou art bidden of any man to n ;n “He that hath my commandments, ami 

to hear them, tell it unto the church; but wedding, sit not down in the highest room ” koepeth them, lie it is thatloveth me,” 14 : 

if lie neglect to hear the church, let him But when thou art hidden, go and eit down 21. 

be unto thee as a heathen man and a publi- in the lowest room.” When thou makest a “ lie that loveth me not, keepeth not m\ 

can,” matt. 18 : 15-17. “Then came Peter dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor sayings,” 24v. “If ye keep my command- 

to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy incuts, ye shall abide in my love,” 15 : 10 . 


can,” matt. 18 : 15-17. “Then came Peter 
to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my 
brother sin against me, and I forgive him ? 
till seven times? Jesus saith unto him, I 
say not unto thee, Until seven times ; but, 
Until seventy times seven,” 21, 22. 


Jesus says, “If ye continue iu my word, 
then are y e my disciples indeed,” jn. 8 : 
31 “He that hath my commandments, and 
keepeth them, he it is thatloveth me,” 1 4 : 
21 . 

“ lie that loveth me not, keepeth not mv 
sayings,” 24v. “If ye keep my command- 


thy brethren, neither tliy kinsmen, nor thy incuts, ye shall abide in my love,” 1 5 : 10. 
rich neighbors ;** *. But when thou mak- “Why call ye me Lord, L<ud, and do mt 
est a feast, call the poor, tho maimed, the the things which I say?” 6:46. John 
lame, the blind,” luke 14 : S, 10, 12. 13. says, “Whosoever transgresseth, and abid 
“A new commandment I give unto you, That r-tii not in the doctrine of Christ, hath not 


“If thy brother trespass against thee, re- ye love one another; as 1 have loved you, | God,” 2 JN. 9. 
buke him ; and if he repent, forgive him ; i that ye also love one another,” jn. 13 : 34 Paul says, They that obey not the gospel 
and if he trespass against thee seven times 1 “Search the Scriptures ; for in them yc think j of our Lord Jesus Christ, shall be punished 
in a day, and seven times in a day turn ye have eternal lile : aud they arc they > with everlasting destruction, 2 these. 1 • 
again to thee, saying, I repent; thou shalt which testily of me,” jn. 5 : 39. “If] 8, 9. 

forgive him,” LUKE 17 : 3, 4 “What there- any man thirst, let him e mne unto me and | There arc vet many beautiful sayings of 
fore Ood hath joined together, let not man drink,” 7 : 37- “And as limy were cat- Jesus, given, which are scarcely enuiner'- 
put asunder,” matt. 17:6. “Whosoever ing, Jesus tcok bread and blessed it, and i ted under the commands, by man; and m-: 
shall put away his wife, except it he for forni- brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and are indispensable to the child ol God. F i 
cation, and shall marry another, eonimitteth said, Take, eat ; this is my loth/. .Ami he example, Where he, in his sermon on the 
adultery ; sind whoso marrieth her which is took tho cup, aud gave it to them, saying, j mount says, Blessed are the pure in spirit 
put away, doth commit adultery,” MATT. Vrmk ye all of it.' ' matt. 26 : 26, 27. “And | they that mourn ; tho meek ; they that hum 


1872 


HEK/JALX) OH TRUTH 


19 


ger and thirst after righteousness; the mer- 
ciful ; the poor in heart; the peace-makers; 
&o. All thoso who directly oppose these, 
will undoubtedly be unhappy. Jesus abo 
6ays, “Ye must be born again,” jn. 3 : 8. 
The new birth is the most necessary and in- 
dispensable of all things because, without 
which we cannot see the ^kingdom of heav- 
en, nor enter therein. Therefore it i3 very 
necessary that tho sinner earnestly repent, 
and turn to God. and pray with a pure 
heart and new spirit; receive Jesus in 
faith ; bow under his yoko and learn of him, 
and be obedieDt unto him, 

He has become the author of eternal sal- 
vation unto all them that obey him, her 5; 
9. So also must tho penitent cleave unto 
Jesus, and become a spirit with him, and 
live in him; be a partaker of his divine 
nature ; live to him who died and rose for 
you; walk in a new life; continue to the 
end and he shall bo saved ; aud this alone 
through grace, aud not by the merits of our 
good works. 

When yo shall have done all those things 
which are commanded you, say, We are 
unprofitable servants : we have done that 
which was our duty to do, luke 17:10 
But what are those who do not the thing* ; 
which arc commanded them? “But those 
mine enemies who would unt that I should 
reign over them, bring hither, and slay 
them before me,” 19 : 27. J. M. B. 

B — 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Repentance. 

“Except ye repent ye shall all likewise 

perish.” Luke 13: 3 — 6. 

The human heart is so depraved 
in nature as not to be worthy a sin- 
gle, good deed. It is utterly impos- 
sible for the pnregenerate heart to 
perform good works, for every mo- 
tive, not inspired by love to God, is 
selfish and impure. Lovemust first 
he felt in the heart before it can flow 
out to others. Hence we can not 
hope for the favor of God unless we 
are moved by that sense of unwor- 
thiness or conviction of sin, which 
always precedes repentance. The 
wholebeing mustbe changed; for the 
carnal mind is enmity against God. 
The apostle tells us that nothing 
short of a new creature avails. As 
long as one natural desire remains 
in us, we are not free from danger. 
Christ well knew the wickedness of 
the human heart, when he urged his 
disciples to trust only in prayer, 
and not be deluded by the tempter 
into a fancied security. In this he 
taught them and us the great need 
of unceasing watchfulness, that we 
enter not into temptation, and when 
conscious of h a v i ng sinned , with ti n e 
penitence, ask forgiveness. Lust aft- 


er things pleasant to the taste oft- 
en leads us to indulge in that which 
dishonors us as men, and makes us 
a very reproach to our Maker. 
Who is not conscious of having 
wronged himself and sinned against 
God, times without number, by not 
controlling his appetite? Think how 
suddenly Adam and Eve lost their 
purity and peace of mind for a sim- 
ilar violation, and that, “Except ye 
repent, ye shall all likewise perish.” 

Another example is found in the 
life of Cain, who for envy slew his 
brother, and then tried to deceive 
the Lord by telling a falsehood. 
IIow terrible was his punishment 
and the Lord says, that unless you 
repent of evil designs against your 
neighbor, you shall likewise perish. 

In the days of Noah, the people 
gave themselves up to lewdness, 
vice and crime, tempting the Lord 
to destroy them, which he did by 
covering the earth with water. In 
our day, persons seem to care little 
j for God and his blessings. Even 
many of those who profess his name, 
desecrate his ceremonies, laws and 
institutions, and pander their favor 
with God for applause of men, out- 
raging conscience, and betraying 
their Lord to the scoffings of wicked 
men. Oh, let the voice of warning 
come to you in time “Except ye re 
pent ye shall all likewise perish.” 
Should the Lord visit us as he did 
Sodom and Gomorrah to see wheth- 
er they deserved destruction, Would 
he find any righteous? Or if any, 
perchance so few that he could not 
save us for their sake. Have we 
not tempted the Lord to destroy us 
for our sinfulness? What manner 
ofwickednessprevailed among them 
which is not practised in our day? 

Let us follow righteous Abraham's 
example, and pray that the Lord 
will spare us for the sake of those, 
who are truly good. Think how 
fearfully God’s wrath was visited 
upon them, and heed his words, 
“Except ye repent ye shall all like- 
j wise perish.” Let us worship God 
in his way, not like Aaron’s sons 
with strange fire, provoke the Lord 
to destroy us. Let us repent of our 
lifeless and formal worship, and 
serve him in spirit and in truth : 
serve him with heart, body and 
soul that we may, by his assisting 
grace, live nearer and nearer to hint 
as we journey on through life, 
mounting higher and higher, the lad- 
der of faith which reaches to the 
gates of heaven. Repent , was the 


cry of John the Baptist, as he ad- 
dressed the multitudes who flocked 
to hear the fore-runner of Christ. 
T’is the only way open to flee from 
the wrath to come. When John’s 
voice was silenced by the murderous 
hand of llerod, Christ took up the 
theme, and, that all men might hear 
the gladsome word, chose disciples 
to carry it to the uttermost parts of 
the earth. 

These faithful ones though perse- 
cuted, chose to serve God rather than 
man; they continued to preach from 
housetop, hill and mountain, and 
to-day, borne on many tongues, is 
echoed from the Atlantic to the Pa- 
cific, and from Cape Horn to the ice 
bound coasts of Greenland, the di- 
vine command, repent. R. 


For th« IloralJ of Truth. 

Serious Thoughts. 

Am I a child of God ? Have I ex- 
perienced a change of heart ? Do I 
love Jesus above all things else? Am 
I prepared to die? Have I laid up 
for myself “treasures in heaven?” 
If death should tind me in my pres- 
ent condition would it be well with 
me? Would the angels come to 
bear my precious soul to that eter- 
nal, happy home in heaven? Ah 
serious thoughts indeed ! Dear 
brethren and sisters (we who pro- 
fess to be the followers of Jesus), 
let us examine ourselves closely 
and see whether we truly are what 
we profess to be; and if y?e find our- 
selves on that narrow path which 
leads to heaven, Oh ! let us be 
watchful, lest Satan again with his 
many snares and temptations, lead 
us captive into his net. Oh ! let us 
be on our guard 1 The work which 
we have begun is so great that we 
dare riot be idle if we wish to obtain 
the crown. Our temptations are 
many; our trials and afflictions at 
rimes seem severe, but let us not be 
discouraged. If we earnestly call 
upon God for help, and are willing 
to be led and guided according to 
liis divine will, he will lead 113 safe- 
ly through this wilderness here be- 
low; and if we hold out faithful un- 
til death, that solemn hour when we 
must go to try the realities of eter- 
nity, we then shall hear the wel- 
come news, “Enter thou into the 
joy of thy Lord.” Oh 1 blessed hope, 
which the Christian can have of 
gaining a home in heaven. But ah, 
sinner, poor sinner, fear and tremble 
at the thought of appearing at the 


I 



HZEUE^-A-XjID OF TRUTH. 


|rt. 


courage and he shall strengthen 
thine heart.” Martin. 


For the Herald of Truth. 


“Rejoicing in Hope.” 

Rom. 12: 12. \ 

If we are justified by faith and 


bar of God unprepared! Oh stop say unto this mountain, Remove ; perhaps not at the time, or in such 
and meditate before you take an- hence to yonder place; and it shall 1 a measure as we may expect or de- 
other step in your downward course; remove: and nothing shall be im- sire it, yet he will remember us in 
perhaps another step will bring possible unto you. Howbeit this the way lie sees most proper for us. 
vour body to the grave, but your kind goeth not out but by prayer If our desire is to be resigned to his 
precious soul (if death finds yon un- and fasting.” will, he will strengthen our hearts 

prepared), will be lost forever. Will O therefore, let us not be so in- that, amidst our afflictions, we may 
you not then take warning in time, credulous, but have faith and wait be of good cheer, and patiently bear 
and fly to Jesus for refuge? Will on the Lord, and be of good cour- whatsoever he may see best to in- 
you not be persuaded to become a age, “That we may obtain mercy, flict upon us for our welfare. There- 
christian while you enjoy the bless- and find grace to help in time of fore, “Wait on the Lord: be of good 
ed privilege? Oil! think of Jesus, need,” for he is “a very present help courage and he shall strengthen 
that dear friend who suffered and in trouble.” And if we wait on the thine heart.” Martin. 

died for you upon the cross. Lord and trust and confide in him, — — 

Will you now refuse to love him? w T e shall not be forsaken nor put to For the neraw of Truth. 

Will you refuse to obey his com- shame, for he giveth his people “Rejoicing in Hope.” 

mands? What will this world with, “their meat in due season,” and Kom. 12: 12. \ 

all its sinful pleasures benefit you “our hearts shall rejoice in him, be- jq- we are justified by faith and 

in a dying hour? Lamentable will cause we have trusted in his holy haTe peace with God through our 
be your condition it you die out of name.’ Isaiah says, “They that Lord Jesus Christ, as Paul says to 
Christ. Great will be the difference wait upon the Lord shall renew t ] le Romans, we can also rejoice in 
between the Christian and the sin- their strength; they shall mount i irmp qil( i Vlorv in tribnlation 
ner in the other world. The clirist- up with wings as eagles; they shall “knowing that tribulation worlietli 
lan will be happy; the sinner, run and not be weary; and they patience .’> We know that all things 
miserable throughout the ceaseless shall walk, and not faint.” here n eartll are transitory and 

ages of eternity. Why then are Why then should we despond and perishable, and if we can have that 

there so few who choose the good lose courage, and perhaps murmur ” ame hope witu Paul that if our 

part, is truly a question? Dear when everything does not go ac- eartMy house 0 f this tabernacle 
reader, let us work “while it is day ; cording as we would desire to see it! were dissolved, we have a building 
the night cometh when no man can God has promised to be with those of God a house not made with 
w0 *:’ , , . Mosks Biikxnkman. that serve him faithfully ; and with hands eterna t in heaven, we may 

Elnla, Ohio. a willing heart, and to renew their rejoice ’ ln hope, though the path of 

■ — • — strength, and God is not a man, 0 {n. life through this world maylie 

F«r the n.rai.i .i Truth, that he should lie. 1 le say s, “1 1 j m heset with many obstacles; know- 

Have Faith In the Lord. C0 Y 1 ^ 1 , V 1 * 3 -*• W1 111 110 wl f e ing that “our light afflictions, which 

cast out; and every one that ask-. are j or a m oment, worketh for us a 

“IV ait on the bonl : he of good' etli, leceiveth, and wliat, tilings ^ a j* more exceeding and eternal 
courage, and he shall strengthen soever ye desire, when ye pray, be- W oi(rht of irlorv ” for “we look not 
,hi„e heart.” Ps. 27 : 14. lieve that ye receive them, and ye l iX things which are seen but at 

f WtA 51.1 1 TlflHPSRPfl tl'l*-* eu nto Sllcljll iLn 1L I n /-nci iiTLinli n r>n n oonn • -Pai* 


the night cometh when no man ca 
work.” Mosks Brenneman. 
Eli da , Ohio. 


For the Ileralil ul Truth. 


Have Faith In the Lord. 


thine heart.” Ps. 27 : 


O that we all posessed the same 
faith and composure that David here 
manifests in the language of our 


Therefore let us be strong in our 
faith, assured that the Lord will 


Why is it that we are so slow help in time of need if we are will- 


in believing in the many precious .... 

promises extended to us in the will. But remember, we must wait j which are not seen *and rejoice Tn 
Scriptures, and so ready to despond? on him; trust and confide in him; the hope that we have a house not 
Is it not because of our unbelief? not become unwilling and impatient made with hands, eternal in the 
The Savior said, “All things are when we, even in our affliction, call heavens? Paul says, “We are saved 
possible to him that believetli.” upon his name and ask his bless- j by hope: but hope that is seen is 
And again, “Have faith in God. ing upon us, and receive not so | not hope: for what a man seetli. 
For verily I say unto you, that who- abundantly as we would desire, j w liy doth he yet hope for? But if 
soevershall say unto this mountain, The Lord knows our wants and in- we’hope for that we see not, then do 
be thou removed, and be thou cast digence better than we do; there- \ W e with patience wait for it.” This 
into the sea; and shall not doubt, fore we pray to him as he himself i a the hope by which we are 
but shall believe that those things has taught us to pray, saying, saved and in which we shall rejoice, 
which he saith shall come to pass: “Thy will be done.” Or as the Sav- The apostle John also agrees to this 


ing to submit ourselves unto his 


our life through this world may he 
beset with many obstacles; know- 
ing that “our light afflictions, which 
are for a moment, worketh for us a 
far more exceeding and eternal 
weight of glory,” for “we look not 
at the things which are seen, but at 
the things which are not seen: for 
the things which are seen “are tem- 
poral; hut the tilings which are not 
seen are eternal.” 

Now do we look upon the things 


on him; trust and confide in him; 
not become unwilling and impatient 
when we, even in our affliction, call 
upon his name and ask his bless- 
ing upon us, and receive not so 


pray, saying, 
Or as the Sav- 


i 

we with patience wait for it.” This 
is the hope by which we are 


saved and in which we shall rejoice. 
The apostle John also agrees to this 


cause of your unbelief: for verily 1 
say unto you, If you have faith as 
u grain of mustard seed, ye shall 


petitions and then patiently wait hath this hope in him purifieth him- 
upon him, and lie will, in due sea- 1 self, even as he is pure,” 1. Jn, 3: 
son, grant our request, although I 2, 8. 


21 


1872 IETIEIE^.A.ILjID OIF 1 TRUTH. 


0 then let ns be faithful and “yield 
ourselves unto God, as those that 
are alive from the dead, and our 
members as instruments of right- 
eousness unto God,” so that we 
may also be possessed with that 
hope and composure in which we 
may rejoice and be glad. What 
are the pleasures of this world? 
James, when reproving worldly de- 
sires, asks the question, “What is 
your life?” to which he himself an- 
swered, “It is even a vapor, that 
appearetli for a little time, and then 
vanisheth away.” Therefore let us 
not set our affections upon transi- 
tory things, or upon the things 
which are seen, for they are tempo- 
ral and will vanish away, even our 
lives not excepted. May God grant 
us grace to rejoice in hope and hold 
out faithful to the end. Martin. 

^ ^ 

For the Herald ol Truth. 

Disobedience io God and tlie Pun- 
ishment. 

God created man in his own im- 
age, a pure, happy, holy creature. 
Soon, however, he forgot the good- 
ness and mercy of God, and his 
love to him. In a short time Adam 
and Eve, being misled by the soph- 
istry of the serpent, partook of the 
forbidden fruit, and thus became 
disobedient unto their great Crea- 
tor. Because of this first disobedi- 
ence of man, God said unto Adam, 
“Cursed is the ground for thy sake; 
in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the 
days of thy life; thorns and thistles 
shall it bring forth to thee.” 

In process of time, Cain and Abel 
presented offerings unto the Lord. 
Unto Abel and to his offering the 
Lord had respect; but unto Cain 
and to his ottering lie had not re- 
spect, therefore Cain was wroth and 
slew his brother Abel. For this 
wickedness and disobedience, God 
saiduntohim, “Now artthou cursed 
from the earth, which hath opened 
her mouth to receive thy brother's 
blood from thy hand. When thou 
tillest the ground, it shall not hence 
forth yield unto thee her strength; 
a fugitive and a vagabond shalt 
thou be in the earth.” 

As men increased in number, they 
also became more wicked and diso- 
bedient to God the Lord, and he 
said, “My Spirit shall not always 
strive with man, for that lie also is 
flesh.” The disobedience of man 
at this time brought the vengeance 
of God upon them, and every soul 


upon the face of the earth was de- 
stroyed, except righteous Noah and 
his family. 

Pharaoh, disobeying God and re- 
fusing to let the Israelites depart 
in peace, was overthrown in the 
Red Sea, with all his host. The Is- 
raelites traveled in the wilderness 
forty years; till all the people that 
were men of war, which came out 
of Egypt, were consumed, because 
they obeyed notthe voice oftheLord. 
Thus they all perished there, except 
Caleb and Joshua, who alone of all 
the great number, were permitted 
to enter the promised land. 

For offering strange lire before 
the Lord, which lie commanded them 
not, there went out a fire from the 
Lord and devoured Nadab and 
Abihu for their disobedience. 

Korah, Dathan and Abiuam rose 
up in rebellion against Moses and 
Aaron, the servants of God, and for 
their disobedience, the Lord caused 
the earth to open her mouth and 
swallow them up, and “They and 
all that appertained to them went 
down alive into the pit, and the 
earth closed upon them; and they 
perished from among the congre- 
gation. 

There came a man of God from Ju- 
dah unto Bethel, whom God com- 
manded , saying, “Eatnot bread, nor 
drink water, nor turn again by the 
same way that thou earnest, “but be- 
ing persuaded b} r a prophet that 
lied unto him, he went back and 
did eat and drink with him, and 
the prophet that brought him back 
cried unto the man of God, saying, 
“Thus saith the Lord, Forasmuch 
as thou hast disobeyed the mouth 
oftheLord. and hast not kept the 
commandments which the Lord thy 
God commanded thee, * * Thy car- 
cass shall not come to the sepulchre 
of thy fathers,” “And when lie was 
gone, a lion met him by the way 
and slew him.” 

We have mentioned a few instan- 
ces of disobedience, and the punish- 
ment thereof. The Bible contains 
many more such, and I hope this 
will cause many to examine the 
Scriptures more closely and care- 
fully. and reflect more upon them, 
and thereby be induced to obey God, 
and flee from the wrath to come. 

The Lord says, “Behold, T set be- 
fore you this day a blessing and a 
curse; a blessing, if ye obey the 
commandments of the Lord your 
God, which I command you this 
day; and a curse, if you will not 


obey the commandments of the Lord 
your God.” 

Solomon says, “Cease, my son, 
to hear the instruction that causeth 
to err from the words of knowl- 
edge.” 

“Blessings are upon the head of 
the just; but violence covereth the 
mouth of the wicked.” 

Samuel says, “To obey is better 
than sacrifice.” “Vengeance is mine; 
I will repay, saith the Lord.” 

God requires man to be obedient 
unto his laws, and says through 
John, that “his commandments are 
not grievous." 

We read that all who were diso- 
bedient unto God, have suffered the 
punisment of the Lord, as did Adam 
and Eve, Cain, Nadab and Abihu, 
Korali, Dathan and Abirum, as Saul 
and the man of God. 

As God's word is truth, all who 
continue to be disobedient to his 
precepts, will reap the just reward 
of their labors. J. S. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

I Wisli. 

How often do we hear people say , 
“I wish 1 had never done it,” refer- 
ring to something which the}' did 
in their childhood, or youth. Or, 
“I wish I had known to what it 
would lead me;” or, “if I had known 
in my young days what I now know 
I never should have done thus and 
so.” 

Among the many things done by 
young people, which almost every 
one regrets in old age, are the fol- 
lowing. One of the first, and one 
which is most regretted, is disobe- 
dience to parents. It leaves a sting 
in the heart which can never be re- 
moved. When our parents ad moii 
isb and plead with us to avoid bail 
company, or to stay away from 
places of worldly amusement, or to 
leave off some bad habits which we 
practice, and often with tears in 
their eyes, and a painful heart on 
account of the great concern they 
feel for our welfare and we turn 
away from them indillerently, and 
heedless of their earnest admoni- 
tions, they will, at some future day, 
when our parents shall have passed 
away, irresistibly force themselves 
upon our minds, and cause us pain 
and sorrow, perhaps more painful 
than that of our parents, at tin- 
time we refused their admonitions. 

Think not, dear young friends, 
that this is only supposition it is 


22 


HEBALD OIF 1 TRUTH. 




truth; and if you thus disobey your 
parents, whom God, in his word 
commands us to obey and honor, 
he will not leave you unpunished: 
and as sure as his divine word is 
truth, so sure will every pain and 
sorrow you cause your parents, 
come back to your own hearts at 
some time and punish you all your 
days. 

Another thing which every one 
who once forsakes sin, and strives 
to walk in obedience to the com- 
mands of God, will regret, and which 
often hinders his progress to lioli 
ness and purity, and which can 
never be driven or banished from 
the mind, but will be unpleasant, 
and annoy them all through life, is 
the reading of worthless, foolish 
books, such as novels, comic stories, 
and other trashy reading. It is to 
the mind, as poison to the body, 
which destroys its healthy action 
for .life. It makes an impression on 
the mind, and leaves a stain which can 
never be erased or fully eradicated. 

When old age comes upon us, 
and we desire to meditate upon the 
goodness of God, and desire to 
have our hearts prepared for a tem- 
ple and dwelling place for God’s 
Holy Spirit, and for the Savior 
to abide and sup; these improper 
thoughts with which the mind was 
filled in youth, often unavoidably 
crowd upon us, and the thoughts 
which we desire, are crowded out: 
and often, yea, many times we wish, 
and say, “Oh that 1 had never seen 
or touched such worthless stuff! 
Now it is continually on my mind, 
and is very unpleasant; 1 would 
give all I possess if I could only 
get rid of these thoughts. 

Not long since a mother informed 
me that a teacher told her daughter 
to read anything and everything 
that came in her way; that it would 
make her intelligent. O, what hor- 
rible advice! Terrible to think 
about! A teacher to advise a child 
to fill her mind with matter, 
which in after years would prove a 
curse instead of a blessing, is an 
idea too ridiculous to be entertain- 
ed for a moment ! 

It is good for young people to 
read, and store their minds with 
knowledge; but let it be such as 
will tend to make pure; such as 
will retine the thoughts, and raise 
them above vulgarity; lead them 
into a higher and purer sphere than 
that of the base and worldly honor 
seekeTS. 


Beware my dear young friends, ! If we have heretofore lived in sin, 
and as yon value purity of thought; disobeying God, neglecting to ac- 
as you value a clear conscience, and quaint ourselves hi_s w.il, bv 

future peace of mind and undisturb- 
ed happiness, and nearness to God, 
avoid reading foolish, worthless 
trash. Fear it as you would poison ; 
for it is even worse than poison to 
the body; it poisons the mind all 
through life. Touch it not, there- 
fore, and you will never have to say, 

I wish I had never read such light 
matter. 

There are yet many other things 
practiced in ' youth, which are often 


regretted in old age, all of which 1 
cannot present to my readers at 
present: but 1 will mention that ol 
foolish talking and jesting. This 
habit when once formed, is very 
hard to break off; and it is certain- 
ly very unbecoming for professors 


reading and studying his word; if 
we have loved money, or fame, or 
ease, or pleasure, or any other ob- 
ject more than God, then are we yet 
carnal-minded and unfit for Heaven, 
and a change must take place, a 
change so great that the Savior calls 
it being “born again.” Not by 
works of righteousness which we 
have done, but according to his mer- 
cy he saved us, by the washing of 
regeneration, and renewing of the 
Holy Ghost, which he shed on us 
abundantly through Jesus Christ 
our Savior, Tit. 3: 5, 6. “Then will 
I sprinkle clean water upon you, 
and ye shall be clean ; from all your 
filthiness, and from all your idols 
will I cleanse you. A new heart 


iv very sinurtuniui„ 

if Christianity to use vain, idlelan- also will I give you, and a new spirit 

.1 J ,'.ii . *1 1 T A 4-1. i .i .mil i Is is A Tlinll 


milage, and is also forbidden in 
God’s word. We are told that for 
every idle word we speak, we must 
give an account in the day of judg- 
ment. Read Eph. 4:5. 

Much more might be said on this 
subject, and many more unnecessa 


will I put within you; and I will 
take away the stony heart out of 
your flesh, and I will give you a 
eartof flesh.” Ezek. 36:25, 20. 
The new birth, as we lear- from the 
above passages, means a total re- 
newal of the course of life, so that 


ry habits which young people get in- instead of clinging to sin, there is 
to mi°ht be mentioned, which they a prevailing disposition to holiness, 
will regret in maturer years; but I This change is produced andcher- 
hope my young friends, after read- islied by the influences of Gods 
inn- what i have written you, will try Spirit in our hearts. 
to°avoid all habits which are con- As long as any one lives in sin, 
trary to the word of God, and which he lives in unrest, and he is without 

J • * • 4 1 1 • 1 


are unbecoming to 


intelligent men 
and women; and remember that 
habits are much easier formed than 
removed. Form such habits in 
youth as you will not regret when 

" 1 1 t t • n i _ J i. 


God and without hope in the world. 
The Spirit of God will come and 
strive to cause such to change their 
course of life, and seek for release 
from the crushing burden of sin. 


you get old. “Finally7'brethre~n, They who yield themselves to the 
whatsoever things are true, whatso influences ot the Holy Spirit, will be 
ever things are honest, whatsoever led step by step, into the new life, 


things are just, whatsoever things 
are pure, whatsoever things are 
lovely, whatsoever things are of 
good report; if there be any virtue, 


and into the love and favor of God. 
And though they will still have hu- 
man infirmities to contend with, and 
trials to endure as long as they are 


and if there be any praise, think on in the flesh, yet all these things will 

. , . «« i • ■» a /i --- a i.l r 4- j v mi .f hi -Tew f li m crr\e o fifl 


theso things.” 


Phil. 4: 0. 
Brother Henry 


For the Ilorald of Truth. 

The New Birth. 


work together for their good, and 
when the time for their departure 
comes they can say, “I have fought 
a good fight, I have finished my 
course, I have kept the faith; hence- 
forth there is laid up for me a 
crown of righteousness, which tin* 
Lord, the righteous judge, shall 
‘ " N. G. R. 


To all who are yet in darkness, 
and under the bondage of sin, but . . 

struggling to gain light, and peace, S lve me at taat day 
and salvation, there will come that 
solemn question: What shall we do 
to be saved ? 

The Savior says, “Except a man 
be born again, he cannot see the 
kingdom of God.” Then we may 




‘‘Why beholdest thou the mote that ia in 
thy brother’s eye, but consiilercst not tin' 
beam that is in thine own eye? Or how 
wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out 
of thine eye ; and, behold, a 


v,* * I the mote out ol ttnne eye, 

ask; “What is it to be born again?” | beam is in thine awn eye?” 



XIIEljR.A.XXD OF TRUTH. 


For the Ileratd of Truth. 

“The Lord is merciful and gracious.” 

Ts- 103: 8. 


he has not called us to judgment 
long before this time. He might 
have great reason to say, “Why 


Hast tliou ever considered how I oumbereth it the ground?” 
gracious the Lord is to the whole is alo «e for our good that God 
human family? how he upholds flms deals with us, as the poet says, 
every thing that is good^and well- “While the lamp holds out to burn, 

pleasing in his sight? \ea, he up- The vilest sinner may return.” 

holds even his enemies. Ye that ! 


do not his divine will are even his Again how gracious the Lord is 
enemies. O what a gracious Father when he sendeth rain on the good 
in heaven. You may say, Why and evil; and letteth his sunshine 
doth he uphold even* liis enemies? ‘ on the just and unjust. He thus 
Because the Lord is gracious. j blesses mankind, and yet how un- 
The Lord of glory has no pleasure : grateful we are toward him. . Dost 
in the death of a sinner. Hast thou : tliou see, Oh poor, careless sinner, 
ever considered what the Son of God | you are doomed to eternal woe and 
has done and suffered for you? I misery, unless you speedily repent. 
Behold him on the cross. O ‘how When you once feel your unworthi- 
shamefully treated. With cruel ness, and that you are a condemned 
hands nailed to the cross. His | sinner in the sight of God, il you 
hands and feet pierced with nails. I ean say as the poor publican 

Thus he was nailed to the shameful did, “ Lord be merciful to me a srn- 


and feet pierced with nails. ! ean say as the poor publican 
e was nailed to the shameful did, “ Lord be merciful to me a sin- 
Why did he thus suffer? nerf then you can realize that the 

J ___t- i • • i • e 


Hast tliou ever considered why the 
Lord of glory had thus to suffer? 
It was to redeem us poor rebels. 
The whole human family (after 


Lord is gracious; but if you go on 
in sin, and folly, and the pride of! 
life, in swearing, in drunkenness, 
in gluttony, in gambling, in robbery 


Adam's transgression) was in a per- ! 9 1 * nnirder, J ou will not go unpun- 
ishing state. God could not endure i ished, But when Christ shall come 
to see poor, fallen man perish thus; ’ u the clouds of heaven in all his 
and immediately after the fall of glory with his angels, to judge the 
Adam, God promised a deliverer ' world in righteousness, then you 
that should deliver the fallen race i will hear the awful sentence, “De- 
in due season; and in the seventh | part from me ye cursed, into over- 
age of the world, Christ our Lord j lasting fire, prepared for the devil 
and Savior, in the fullness of time, an( l angels;” where there will ; 
wasborn of theblessed virgin, Mary, be weeping and gnashing of teeth, 
at Bethlehem, and laid in a manger. ari( l where there will be no more re - 1 
This promise was fulfilled in about pentance. Oh think of these things, 
three thousand nine hundred and I How can you endure the thought, of; 
seventy four years. At this time beingcastinto outer darkness and de- j 
God sent his only Son into the world, ! barred from God's presence forever ? : 
that whosoever believeth in him never to enjoy the blessings granted j 
should not perish hut have everlast- ' to bis people* in eternity , where 
inglife. This is the Son of God, the there will be no more sickness, sor- 
Lord of glory, who was nailed to the row, pain, nor death. On, think of 
cross, andboreoursinsthat we might the vast difierence of those two pla- 
live; to the end that we might be | (, es; to one or the other we must go; 


happy forever, and be where he there to receive our just reward; 
(Christ) is and behold his glory. 1 either to hear the sentence, “Come 
0 what amazing love. You can ve blessed,' &c, or “Depart ye curs- 


plainly see from this, that the Lord 
is gracious as in the text. Hast 
thou considered, even for a mo- 
ment, who gave thee breath, life. 


ye blessed, ”&c, or “Depart ye curs- 
ed, ^ ’We. Reflect upon these sayings 
before it is forever too late. \Y e 
have no assurance of life for a day, 1 
or even for the present hour. Oh, is 


health, and the comforts of earth? it not worth while to devote our tune 
Look around you and ask the in serving the Lord rn m<.*ekness 
question. Who has created all this? and humility. “Drove all things;! 
Who lias created me, and for what hold fast that which is good, 
purpose? To do good, or to do evil? ! In conclusion I would say with; 

At this moment let these thoughts \ the poet, 
sink deep in your hearts, and resolve : ./po-day, if yc will hear his voice, 

trom henceforth to try to live more | Now h the time to make your choice ; 
in accordance with God’s word. It 1 s : ,y, Will you to Mount Zion go? 

is through his infinite mercy that' Say’ Will you have this Ohmt or no? 


Ye wambling souls, who find no rest, 

Say,, Will you be forever blest? 

Will you be saved from sin and hell ! 

Will you with Christ in glory dwell ? 

Once more we ask you in his name — 

For yet his love remains*the same — 

Say, Will you to Mount Zion go ?| 

Say, Will you have this Christ or no ? 

Leave all your sports and gUtt’ring toys, 

Come share with us eternal joys ; 

Or must we leave you bound to hell — 

Then, dear young friends, a long farewell 

Jacob B. Culp. 

Wakarvsa, Did. Dec. 24 th 1871. 

wm ♦ m 

For the IDiraM of Truth. 

Enough. 

The Governor of Michigan has 
issued a proclamation to the peo- 
ple of the United States, in which 
he says, “He now takes pleasure in 
announcing that further contribu- 
tions for the relief of sufferers by 
the late disastrous fires in that State 
are unnecessary.” The Governor 
tenders the hearty thanks of the 
whole people of Michigan to those 
whose earnest sympathy and liberal 
aid have so greatly alleviated tin* 
sufferings of so many of its citi- 
zens. 

In the case of the sufferers from 
lire in Chicago, aid has been sent 
from almost every part of our land, 
and from England, Germany, and 
I believe, from several other parts 
of Europe, and even from the “ulti- 
mate parts of the earth,” from 
China, heathen, as we call its people. 

\Ye sometimes feel as if the world 
were steadily growing worse, sink- 
ing deeper in corruption, and doubt 
less it is in some respects, but it 
is only truth to say that in some 
other respects it is slowly growing 
better. The nations of the earth 
are getting to know one another 
better. China and Japan, formerly 
closed against all “outside barba- 
rians,’’ as they called other nations, 
are slowly opening themselves, and 
are losing some of their prejudices 
against foreigners. They are even 
now sending a number of their 
young men to this country, to our 
schools to learn from us what they 
can. They are building railroads, 
and constructing telegraphs. The 
more intercourse they have with na- 
tions in which the Bible is lead and 
believed in, the more clearly do they 
seem to see that Christian civiliza 
lion is better than the idolatry and 
darkness whieh abound in their 
own countries. J. K. Hartzler. 


HIEUR-ALLD OF TBUTH. 


£<lr, 


itrallr of (frtttb. 


Elkhart, Ind., January 1872. 

To our Subscribers. — If any of our subscribers do not 
get their papers regularly, or if any persons who sond ior 
books, Ac., do not obtain them in due time, they will confei 
a favor by informing us, and we will do our best to have 
everything properly forwarded to its destination. 

How TO send Monet. — If in sums more than a dollar, it 
Is best to obtain either a draft, or a Post Office mone> 
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registered. 

■ ■■ ■— o 

Those of our subscribers who do not wish to take the 
Herald of Truth any longer, will please to inform us cl 
the fact by letter and pay up all arrearages, and the 
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tain this valuable work may have ffiarrMirttmhmtt 

it promptly forwarded to them, by ^QXVtZ$OWtn£Z. 

sending in their orders to this office. | — 

Tlie price of the work is $4.50 cents From the Church in New Orleans, La. 
per copy Any person taking 12 . ^ Fq Qn ^ rf March m 

•opies will receive one copy gratis. : ]eft home for the purp08e 0 f making a 
We have gone to a great expense trip to j^ ew Orleans. I took the cars at 
in translating and publishing the t Burlingame, Osage Co., Kansas, and went 

work, so that onr people might have to Sfc Louis; there I took the boat to New 
’ , 1 ? Orleans, where I arrived safely on the <th 

-he opportunity to examine ana 0 p ^ pr ;i Avd as I was an entire stranger 

read the writings of the eminent there I sought lodging at a public house, 

reformer whose name our church ami the next day I met our brethren iu the 

, , - . 3 -n faith. I first came to Bro. Christian Mourer, 

bears, and we hope our fi lends \\ w } iere i wa s kindly received and provided 

feel an interest in selling as many f or as long as I remained there. There are 
copies as possible. Single copies fifteen members of the Ornish Church 

of the work may be sent by mail, ™ th . is <%-, 1 Ea f' ” l! *! 1 " 1 ! 

and those wishing to have them t ^ c j j0rc g 8 Supper. Bro. Christian Mourer 


In Sending the Names of Sub- and those wishing to have them thc j j0rc p 8 Supper. Bro. ( 
scribers, write the name, Post-Of- thus sent will please add G4cts to is the pastor ot the church, 

_ t o n r _ • a 1 


le communion of 
Christian Mourer 


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Orders, or registered letters. Re- 
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possible. 


the price for Postage. It may be 
obtained at the following places: 


If any Mennonite brethren pass through 
that city and wish to stop, they will call on 
Bro Mourer at 46 Elmire street. I feel 


J. E. Barr’s Bookstore Lancas- thankful to the brethren and sisters for their 


"er, Pa. 


love and kindness. 


t n tt -n v -.XT . Dec 25th 1871. Jacob Kauffman. 

J . C. Hunsicker, Berlin, W aterloo ' mm , n Qwgc _ Km 


New Subscribers. - With the Lancaster coun , 

commencement of the bew Xea. Jacob Pnnk 

will be a good time to gather new p a 

subscribers. We hope our friends ’ 1 

will make an effort to extend the Our Patrons 

circulation of the Herald as much fully the little slips 

as possible. As an inducement to papers to see whetl 

this we will renew our former offer, rcctly or not. In i 

that any person sending us four * re ma d e * n our ma 

new subscribers with four dollars time ' sonie nustaliC 

to pay for the same shall have the thank an y onc for 1 

Herald a year free for his trouble. tliey niay discover ‘ 

This will be an easy way to obtain jj gw Ge 

the paper free and w r e hope many called the Al/gemeii 

will avail themselves of the oppor- com P le ted and 
. -j This book is a sr 

tumty to do so. 


county, Ont. 

Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, 
Lancaster county, Pa. 

Jacob Funk, near Line Lexing- 
ton, Pa. 


A Visit to Indiana. 


Our Patrons will please examine care- , oyer night with Jcwit Messick, my brother- 
fully the little slips or address labels on their j i n _ia\r. On the ll I took the train for Elk- 
papers to see whether they are credited cor- hart, aud stopped with Bro. II. B. Brennc- 
rectly or not. In the many changes which n,an until the 12th. I then went home with 


On the 9th of Oct., 1871, I left home 
for the purpose of attending the Confer- 
ence in Elkhart Co., Indiana. I arrived 
at Milford, Ind., on the 1 Oth, and remained 


u-e made in our mailing list at the present ]* r0, K> - eider, whcie I met Bio. J. M. 

. , * . ... Brenneman. In the evening we held meet- 

time, some mistakes may occur, and we will ; ftt Shauiu ’ s Meeting house. On the 13th 


thank any one for advising us of any errors we attended Conference at Yellow Creek 
they may discover. Meeting-house ; here I met many brethren 

. . from a distance, with whom I had not the 

Tbe New German Hymn-book, pleasure of a previous acquaintance. 


called the A Uyrmeiuc Lieriersummlumj, is now 
completed and ready for delivery. 


On the afternoon of the 14th there was 
completed and ready for delivery, j meeting at the same house. On the 15th 
This book is a small work containing 41G £ attended a meeting at Bro. Funk’s house, 
pages, and 333 of the best German hymns ; n Elkhart, and in the cveuiug we held a 

i • n i* i t -i 7 . . ° ^ i 


pages, giving a graphic description 
of the terrible tires in Chicago, in 
the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, 
and Minnesota, published by S. E. 
Woodworth, and is for sale at this 


D , - rm . . .. with an appendix of English hymns, and J meeting at Shaum’s Meeting-house. On the 

L/Uicago -Burned. HllS IS the a variety of metres best adapted to be £ 6th wo met at Yellow Creek, aud in the 
Title of an octavo pamphlet of 82 sung both in private and public worship. evening at Holdeman’s Meeting-house, 
pages, giving a graphic description The P r * ce die work is as follows; | On the 17th we again met at Yellow, Creek, 

of the terrible tires in Cllicaffo, in Bynail postage prepaid per .ingle Copy, .or, ,„d oa .the 18 th there was meeting at Hoi- 

. “ “ “ “ Dozen $G. 50 deman s, at which place there were two pre- 

the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, “ Express per Doz. 5 50 cious souls added to the church by bap- 

and Minnesota, published by S. E. “ Express per hundred $45.00 tisni. May God bless them, and assist them 

Woodworth, and is for sale at this ^ - “ — . n . £ aithful T fol, ? wers of the meek and 

Our Family Almanac lor 1S72 is lowly Jesus. In the evening we had mect- 
office, and the balance still on hand now ready for delivery. It contains many I ing in Elkhart. All these meetings were 
will be closed out at 12 cents a copy good ail( l interesting articles, and should j well attended. 

^ ^ 1 ? 1 • a •% r *a n m mi 1 n.l T 1 .A. LM1.1 1 J ! _ .,1 


by mail or 75 cents a dozen. 

Menno Simons Complete Works.— 

in the English language is now ready 
for delivery. All who wish to ob- 


tind its way into every Mennonite family. The 1 9th I left Elkhart, aud remained 
All orders will be promptly filled by mail at over night with my brother-in-law, at Mil 
10 cts. per single copy, or 70 ets. per dozen, ford; here I met the brethren, J. M. and 
or when sent by Express at $5. 00 per him- C. 15. Brenneman and wife, of Allen Co., 
dred, Express charges to bo paid by the Ohio. I went home with them, and on the 
purchaser. 2lst Bro. J. M. Brenneman and I went to 



HERALD O-F 1 TRUTH. 


Putnam Co. ; on the 22nd we held a meet- ites are not all extinguished, therefore let us A brother invited me to visit his family 
in<r at Stemen’s School house ; in the even- be on our guard and watch, that the hour of one evening, which I promised ; he made it 
[ a cf we had meeting at Shirk’s Meeting- death may not come and find us unprepared, known to his neighbors, and when the even- 

f fVi Iff tr lift Kn\7Q f»nH airld 


house in Allen Co ; on the evening of the 
24th we held meeting at Shenk’s School 
house, we also attended meeting near Bro. 
Samuel Shenk’s, in the United Brethren 
Church. These meetings were well attend- 
ed with attentive audiences. May thebless- 


If we think how many passed from time to 
eternity during last year, and how little 
we know who may live to see the date of 
1873, and the great importance of passing 
from time to eternity ; since we cannot come 
back to correct errors, but just as death 


ing arrived, about thirty little boys and girls, 
and about twenty grown persons gathered in, 
and we had a very pleasant time. The chil- 
dren sang three or four beautiful pieces, in 
which some of the older ones joined, and 
afterwards I talked to them a short time ; 


ed with attentive audiences. May the bless- back to correct errors, but just as death atterwards I talked to tnem a snort time ; 
ing of God rest with our labors, and may overtakes us, judgment finds us, therefore then we all kneeled down and prayed, and 
they tend to the upbuilding of the church we should be more earnest in that duty I felt that God was present with us, and I 


of God. 

I left Elida on the 27th, and stopped 
with Bro. Jos. Kurtz, near Bremen and ar- 
rived at home the next day and found my 
family in tolerably good health. Thanks 
be to God for his care and protection over 
them during my absence. 

I desire to express my love and thanks, 
to the brethren and sisters among whom I 
visited, for the unmerited kindness they 
showed me whilst among them. The Lord 
reward them. 

Bremen , Ohio. ‘ C. C. BEERy. 


committed to us by our God, namely, to hope we were all benefited 


and stopped wor k out the salvation of our souls. At one time, accompanied by a brother, 

remen and ar- I have enough to do to till and keep my we stopped at a schoolhouse ; the teacli- 
md found my own garden without speaking to others, but er invited me to talk to the scholars.. I 
ilth Thanks still 1 see much outside which I wish I could spoke to them perhaps ten minutes, giving 
rotcction over niake better. What a pity we so often see them some good advice which I hope they 
manhood disgraced by the consequences of will never forget. 

1 fl V neglected youth, and old age oppressed by Now let me yet say to all the children 
can lan s, care belongs to a former period, and with whom I talked, as l love you all dearly, 

nong whom I afc the c £ ose 0 f life the dying man beholds and feel much concerned for your good and 
-in ness K > w ith anguish that his days are finished when welfare, Will you try to remember what I 
m. 1 tie Lord his preparat i on for eternity has hardly com- told you? AY ill you remember that I told 
^ menced. I must close with my best New you, That to love and serve God, our Mak- 

J C. BEERy. years wishes to all. Your brother ^r, gives us more pleasure and happiness in 

John Shenk. this world than anything else we can do ? 


From Lancaster, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 1st, A. D. 1872. 

Dear Brother J. F. Fuuk, Enclosed here- 
with I send you one dollar. Please contin- 
ue my paper, the Herald of Truth. I have 
been a reader of it from its first issue, and 
wish it continued. This letter contains my 
first date in 1872, and it seems but a short 
time since we first wrote 1871, but a year 
passed between those two dates never to re- 
turn, and in truth we can say with an an- 
cient poet, -Time once past never returns,” 
and the moment which is lost, is lost forever. 
Blair also says among many other things, 


!l}Ubren's ©apartment. 


v My Travels. 

Dear children, I am still in Pennsylvania. 
At the time of writing this I was in Lancas- 
ter county. By the time this Herald reach- 
es its readers, I expect to be in Bucks or 
Montgomery county. After visiting there 
a few weeks I shall return to Lancaster 
county. If any of my little friends wish to 
write letters to me before the twentieth of 


Time, we ought to consider as a sacred trust February, they will direct them to Mount 


committed to us by God, of which we are 
now the depositaries, and are to render an 
account, at the last day. That portion of it 
which has been allotted to us, is intended 
partly for the concerns of this world, and 
partly for those of next ; let each of these 
occupy in the distribution of our time, that 


Joy, Lancaster county, Pa., and after that 
to Elkhart. 

I have so far enjoyed my visit in Penn- 
sylvania very -well. The brethren and sis- 
ers are very friendly and kind, for which I 
feel very thankful towards them and to- 
wards God. The little folks, too, are as i 


this world than anything else we can do ? 
Remember that as long as we are not God’s 
children, and doing what he desires us to 
do, we are sinning against him ! He is so 
very good and kind to us, and is every day 
blessing us with so many good things, and 
loves us so much. If wo disobey him, wo 
are obeying Satan, that wicked one, who 
tries to lead us away from God into ever- 
lasting punislmieut. lie docs us no good at 
all; he only tries to make us believe that if 
we serve God we can have no pleasure in 
this world; but he is a liar, and we must not 
believe him. 

Do not forget me, my dear little friends ; 
and if we should not meet again in this 
world, let us try to be good, that we may 
meet in heaveu, with Jesus. 'A r ill my dear 
ones at home pray for me while I am gone, 
that God may protect me, and bring me safe 
home again ? This is the request of your 

Brother Henry. 


The Power of God. 

space which properly belongs to it.” — Now, friendly and loving as they can be; and 1 , 

have we done this within the last year, or cannot tell how much I enjoy myself, from Dear children, did you c^er think of 

have we done so in our lifetime? If not, day to day, with my dear, little friends as the great power of God. Do jou know the 

we certainly ought not delay any longer, but they gather around me and talk. meaning of the word power.- It means to 

begin now, aud if we have made a beginning The second Sabbath I spent in this coun- be able to do a thing. A strung man can 


to live a life to the honor and glory of our ty, the children were called together at onc lilt and carry a ,Cil 'y oa • 
God in Jesus and to the salvation of our of our churches, where I was to address » u eh a man, ie las t ie po 


rid. We say of 
power to carry 


souls, then let us be steadfast and earnest, 
and try to improve the rest of our days 
(which God in his mercy may grant us yet) 
to his honor, and to the welfare of our im- 
mortal souls ; and if we so live we cannot 
help letting our light shine, but I must, 
alas, complain of myself; my light is too oft- 
en darkness ; I often think of a certain phy- 
sician, with whom I was well acquainted, 
who said, “I know I must suffer many stripes, 
because I know so much better than I do,” 
Are there not many of us more or less in 
danger of the same ? Oh, how often did I 


UUl V-I1UI Y. AAV.* ~ * . . 1 T/« I -I 1 I 

them • but as I was not well. I did not feel heavy loads. If a man builds a house, wo 

at all like speaking, but with God’s help, j we may say, he has the power to do it. A 

l talked to them as well as I could. They > person who is sick, and so weak that he can- 


wero all very attentive, and I hope they 
were benefited. There were nearly one 
hundred children present, and a goodly num- 
her of grown persons, young and old. I 
talked to them of the goodness of God, and 
our duty to love and obey him, and of the 
sweet enjoyments of those who serve him ; 
also of the great love of Jesus, our dear 
Savior. I believe nearly all of them ac- 
knowledged that they love him. O, I wish 


wish I had a more careful porter to watch. a nd pray that all of them might love him so 
I know there is an enemy near; the Gibeon- much as never to forsake, or donyhim. 


not walk, lias not the strength or power to 
walk; he is so weak that he cannot help 
himself. He has no power to do anything. 

God is all-powerful; that is, he has the pow- 
er to do whatsoever he will. When he created 
the world, there was nothing from which to 
make it. When a man builds a house lie 
must have boards and lath, aud other lumber 
to make it. Men have the power tocut down 
trees, and saw them into logs, and draw them 
to the saw-mill, and saw them into lumber ; 
but th«y have not the power to make trees 


20 


HBBALD OF TRUTH. 


prow: God makes them grow. There is 
nothing impossible for him to do. 

In the b( ginning Gcd created (made) the 
heaven and the earth. And the earth was 1 
without form ; that is. it had no shape, aud 
it was dark because there was no sun, nor 
moou, nor stars to shine ; but God bad the 
power to make it light; he only said, ‘ Let I 
there be light,” and as soon lie said this 
it bcctmc light. Afterwards, he also made ' 
the sun, the moon and the stars, to shine on 
the earth. O how great and powerful is 
Gnd. lie his the power to destroy any- 
thing that he has made, just as easily as ho 
could make it. 

He had the power to make all the beads, | 
the fishes, and the great whales ; the worms, I 
the little insects, and the birds that fly in j 
the air; and last of all, lie made the first 
man aud the first woman, Adam and Eve t 
lie made every one of us, and he has the i 
power to keep us alive, and also the power 
to take our lives from us at any time he 
pleases. We could not live one minute if God 
did not keep us alive l>y his almighty power. 

When the children of Israel left the land 
of Egypt, and came to the Red Sea, God 
divided the water and it stood like two i 
great walls, and they passed through be- j 
tween them on dry ground And when the j 
Egyptians went in and undertook to pass 
through, after the Israelites, God made the 
waters come together again, and they were 
all drowned. 

Now, dear children, let us often think of 
the great power of God. Let us praise and 
honor him, far lie has made everything 
good, yes, very good. Let us learn to love 
and obey this great God. O yes, let us sing 
praises to our Maker. David says, ‘ Know 
ye that the Lord lie is God; it is he that 
hath made us, and not we ourselves. Enter 
into his g i tes with thanksgiving and into his 
courts with praise.” IV 100 : 3, 4. 

O come and let us loudly sing 
The praises of our Maker, God ; 

Let all the earth with praises ring ; 

And his great power be tolrl abroad. 

We come, O Lord of hosts, we come, 

With praise and honors to thy name ; 

For thou art God, and tliou alone, 

With power and might dost ever reign. 

We praise thee for thy mighty power ; 

We praise thee for thy wondrous deeds ; 

With thnnksnnd reverence we adore 
The Lord whose power alone exceeds. 

O Lord, how wondrous arc thv works ; 

In wisdom hast thou made them all — 

The hills, the mountains, seas and rocks — 
Thou dost create them, great and small. 

Do tliou, O Lord, our hearts renew, 

And fill us with thy love and praise ; 

That we with thanks and honors due, 

May love and servo thee all our days. 

Bitot her Hen ky. 

My son, attend to my words; incline 
thine ear unto my sayings Let them not 
depart from tliioe eyes ; keep them in the 
midst of tiling heart. For they arc life unto 
those that Cud them, und health to all their 
flesh. 


Try to bo Good. 

Children, try to be good ! 

That is the. end of all teaching. 
Easily understood, 

And very easy in preaching. 

Is it easy to do ? 

Speak, if you’ve really been trying 
To be entirely true, 

And honestly self-denying ; 

To weep with those that weep, 

To be just in every dealing ; 

A careful watch to keep 


we do ? I read a chapter in the Testament 
in the morning, and in the evening I read 
a chapter in the Bible. I have read the 
Testament through once and lam reading it 
I through again. I think it is necessary for 
us to make good use of our time while we 
are young, fur we know not how soon wo 
may pass away ; but if we try to do right 
while we live, we will not be afraid to die. 
I wish you would come and visit us too. 


Belleville, Pa. 


Mary Yoder. 


careful watch to keep ; Dear Brother Ilenry, I have the pleasure 

On temper, and tongue, and feeling; ! of writiug you a few lines, to let you know 


Your greatest joy to find 
In giving another pleasure, 

And trying not to mind 
That yours is the smallest measure ; 

With a heart to hold and bless 
Both loyalty and freedom; 

With a loving little Yes, 

And asmile, for those who need them; 

Yet all the time to show 

Of steadfast faith the beauty. 

And he able to say No, 

When saying No’s a duty. 

Children, try to be good ! 

That is the end of all* teaching, 

Easily understood, 

And very easy in preaching; 

And if you find it hard, 

Your efforts you need hut double ; 

Nothing deserves reward 
Unless it gives us trouble.. 


Letters From the Children. 


Dear Bro. Henry, I will write you a few ! 
lines. I am a reader of the Herald of 
Truth. I have read it for seven years. 1 
love to read it. I think it is interesting to 
all who take it. I have also read the Testa- 
ment through, and half of the Bible in the 
past year, and have commenced at the be- 
ginning again. I would like to have you 
com a and visit us. I have heard mueh 
about you, but have never seen you. 

Mary Fletcher 

Ontario , Ricliiand Co , Ohio, 

— 

Dear Brother Henry, 1 seat myself ; 
with pleasure to write you a little letter 
about the Herald of Truth. In it I have 
often read about you and the little children. 

I am a little girl of eleven years old ; I read 
in the Testament and in the Bible, but not 
so much as I ought to, but 1 will read as ; 

, much as 1 can. 1 am beginning to read the I 
Testament through. This evening I have I 
read about you visiting your little friends. ; 
i I wish you would visit US too. 

Ifttrrisojiburg , Ta. Laura V. Siiank. 

Dear Brother Henry, by the will of the j 
Lord I am permitted, to write to you again. ' 
j The Lord is very good to us all ; theD ought j 
‘ wo not try to love aud obGy him iu all that i 


i hat my brother and I have not forgotten 
you. I wish you would come to sec us. I 
think it Is necessary for us all to make good 
use of our time while we are young; wo 
should try and do better every day as we 
grow older. 

I see in the last Herald, that you have 
been to sec some of your little friends, and 
j they are highly pleased with your visit. 

I see nothing in the Herald that you 
have been to Canada yet, but I hope you 
will soon come to see us, and keep your 
promise, as we are longing to see you, and 
| have some conversation with you about the 
j welfare of our never dying souls. 

May God bless you iu visiting the, little 
folks, and bless us all and prepaae us for 
: that Spirit world where all the little chil- 
| dren shall he gathered around God’s throne; 
where we shall enjoy each others company 
through the eudless ages of eternity. This 
is the wish of your affectionate little friends 
and well-wishers. 

Nancy A. and Samuel H. Shirk 

Noitaica. 


If I Come to Jesus. 


My yoke is easy ami my burden is light 
Matt. 11 : SO. 

If I come to Jes us, 

Ho will make me glad, 

He will give me pleasure, 

When my heart is sad. 

If I come to Jesus, 

He will hear my prayer ; 
lie will love me dearly, 

He my sins will bear. 

If I come to Jesus, 

He will take my hand ; 

He will kindly lead mo, 

To a better land. 

There with happy children, 
Robed in snowy white, 

I shall sec my Savior, 

In that world so bright. 

If I come to Jesus, 

Happy I shall be ; 

Ho is gently calling 
Little ones like me. 



h:e:r,a.:l,:d of truth. 


J FOOD FORJHE LAMBS. 

Enter not into the path of 
|| the wicked, and go not in the 
i way of evil men. Prov. 4:14. 

He that walketh with wise 
i men shall be wise : but a 
| companion of fools shall be 
| destroyed. Prov. 13:20. 

<$£ 


The following Table will 6how those who 
wish to read the Testament in tho way pro- 
posed what chapter to read each day. 



Days. 

Chapter, j 

Days. 

Chapter. 

Feb 

10 

Acts 

4 

Feb. 

26 

Acts 

20 

it 

11 

n 

5 

it 

27 

it 

21 

It 

12 

tt 

6 

it 

28 

C( 

22 

It 

13 

tt 

7 

it 

29 

it 

23 

it 

14 

tt 

8 

March 1 

tt 

24 

it 

15 

it 

9 

it 

2 

it 

25 

It 

16 

it 

10 

u 

3 

tt 

26 

it 

17 

(i 

11 

tt 

4 

it 

27 

it 

13 

it 

12 

II 

5 

ti 

28 

it 

19 

it 

13 


6 

Romans 1 

it 

20 

tt 

14 

It 

7 

a 

2 

It 

21 

tt 

15 

tt 

8 

tt 

3 

it 

22 

it 

16 

tt 

9 

tt 

4 

ti 

23 

(( 

17 

it 

10 

tt 

5 

It 

24 

tt 

18 

It 

11 

tt 

6 

tt 

25 

(( 

19 

it 

12 

it 

7 


Though often times we’re sore oppressed 
By satan, that great foe; 

Who would have all to follow him, 

Tbftit they might suffer woe. 

“I will not leave you comfortless,” 

No, *‘I will come to you 

How do those words encourage us 
Our journey to pursue! 

Our pilgrimage will close ere long. 

Our labors soon will end ; 

Then shall we all be gathered homo, 
Where joys shall never end. 

Then let us not forsake the way 
Which leads to heaven above ; 

Where Jesus, and good people dwell, 

In unity and love. 

Winetburg, 0. II. A. Mumaw. 

4- 

For tho Herald of Truth 


This table can be written on a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 

. For tho Herald of Truth. 

Another Year Is Past. 

Another year has rolled around, 

And all its ’rials are o’er; 

O yes, dear friends, those days are gone, 
Gone, to return no more. * 

How did we spend the precious time, 
Those many hours aud days ? 

Did we delight to serve the world, 

Or walk in wisdom ways ? 

Did we devoutly yield ourselves 
To that great king above, 

From whom so many blessings flow, 

As tokens of his love? 

0 no, we have not always done 
As he would have us do; 

And since we have so often failed, 

We’ll now begin anew. 

We are too weak, I know full well, 

To run the race alone; 

But with the Savior’s helping hand 
We may at last reach home. 

With what desires then do wo long, 

An entrance there to gain ; 

Where we Bhall see the savior’s face, 
And praise his holy name. 


The Ilerald. 

The Herald of Truth is a welcome 
visitor to many families throughout 
our land. It enlightens, instructs, 
reproves and warns the sinner of 
his danger. And shows how nec- 
essary it is for the sinner to turn 
from darkness to light, and from 
the power of Satan unto God. 

It gives us a knowledge of the 
brethren in distant parts of the 
country; and we are often instruct- 
ed and admonished to contend for 
the faith once delivered to the saints, 
that we may all hold out faithful 
unto the end, and receive the crown 
of glory. 

It no doubt leads many to^earcli 
the Scriptures of divine truth, to see 
if those things are so; and they are 
thereby led to the cross confessing 
their sins, and become believers in 
the gospel of Jesus Christ. 

We ought to have more original 
reading in the Herald, and I would 
frequently write for it if I were com- 
petent for the great task. All ar- 
ticles should be written in the spirit 
of devotion; having an eye single 
to the glory of God, so that they 
would admonish, instruct and re- 
prove, that the man of God maybe- 
come more perfect, thoroughly fur- 
nished unto all good works; for 
without faith, works are dead. Oh, 
how many have made a profession 
of religion and deny their profession 
by their works. 

Our brethren near Canton, Stark 
county, Ohio, extend an invitation 
to the ministering brethren, either 
English or German, to stop with 
them as they are passing back and 
forth. The next meeting will be on 


the 11th of February, and every 
four weeks thereafter. 

We sincerely desire ministers to 
call upon us, for we need assistance, 
English preferable. The harvest 
truly is plenteous, but the laborers 
are few. Persons coming on the Pitts- 
k burg and Ft. Wayne R. R., will 
change cars at Alliance, and go 
south to Moultrie. I reside one 
mile east of Moultrie. Our next 
meeting will be the 14th of January, 
and is held every four weeks. If 
not sooner, perhaps it will be con- 
venient at the next Conference to 
visit us. H. Walter. 

Moultrie , Ohio. 

1 % 

mm* > - C 1 

The Departed. 

The departed, the departed ! 

He visits us in dreams, 

And he glides above our memories, 

Like shadows over streams; 

But where the cheerful lights of home 
. In constant luster burn, 

The loved one that departed 
Can never more return. 

The good, the brave, the beautiful, 

How dreamless is their sleep, 

■ Where rolls the dirge like music 
, Of the ever tossing deep ; 

Or where the surging night winds, 

Pale winter’s robes have spread 
Above the narrow palaces, 

In the cities of the dead. 

1 We look around and feel tho awe 
Of on<? who walks alone, 
i Among the wrecks of former days, 

; In mournful ruin strown ; 

> We start to hear the stirring sounds 
r Among the Cypress trees, 

| For the voice of the departed 
Is borne upon the breeze. 

That solemn voice ; it mingles with 
‘ Each free and careless strain ; 

We scarce can think earth’s minstrelsy 
Will cheer our hearts again ; 
t The melody of summer waves, 
i The thrilling notes of birds, 
r Jan never be as dear to us 
As his remembered words. 


\Ye sometimes dream his pleasant smiles 
Still on us sweetly fall ; 

His tones of love we faintly heard 
Our names in sadness call ; 

We hope that he is happy. 

With his angel plumage on, 

But our heaGs are very desolate 
To think that he is gone. 

Selected for the Ilerald of Truth, ou the 
death of our father, Joseph Brubaker, by 
Anna and Mary Brudakkr 
Wakcirvw Ind 



ZEanEZE^A-IILID OIF TRUTH. 


For the Herald of Truth. 


Colonization of Kansas. 

As there are still some persons 
who are anxious to get information 


means of transportation, it is sup- 
posed that Kansas will become one 
of the great salt producing States 
of the Union. 

Those persons who have not the 


in regard to the colony in Kansas, means to purchase land in the east 
permit me through the columns) of and in Ontario, where the price of 
your valuable paper, to make a few land is high should avail them- 

remarks in regard to the same. As selves of the inducements offered in 
M. W. Keim has sold a large quan- Marion County, Central Kansas, 
tity of land to Mennonit.es and oth- where land is cheap, and terms for 
ers in the county of Waterloo, he payment advantageous. It is to be 
was evidently desirous, in effecting hoped that honest and industrous 
his sales, to sell to such parties as colonists will avail themselves of 
would eventually form Mennonite the inducements now presented to 
Societies in Township No. 19; j them, and secure homes for thern- 
KangeNo. 2 and 3: Marion County, ! selves in the far West, where under 
Kansas. The sections in these j the blessing of a kind, Heavenly 
townships are composed of one Bather they may be well repaid for 
section government, and one section the toil and privations to which 
railway land, alternately through- 1 they may be subjected the first few 
out the townships. Keim is now years. Daniel Burkholder. 


prepared to act as agent to dispose 
of this railway land; it is but do- 
ing justice to him if I state, that 
in transacting business with him, 
1 have always found him reliable 
and trustworthy, and as such could 


Bridgeport Ont. Jan. 21lh 1872. 


For the Herald of Truth. 


A Bargain is a Bargain. 

So says the world generally, es- 


recom mend him to intending pur- pecially he who has the best of the 
chasers. The superior advantages bargain, but he that discriminates 
offered in the sale of these lands, wisely and takes the word of God 
according to statistical and well for his guide, will see that the above 
authenticated reports, are that the expression is an erroneous one, yet 
land is beautiful, with flowing many professing Christians justify 
springs of pure, cold water; timber themselves on this ground, in all 
is rather scarce, but plenty of good their business transactions, 
rock, both lime and building stone; Now for instance, if I should bar- 
lands of first quality. gain with my neighbor to do a cer- 

Tiie climate . tain amount of work for a given 

of Kansas is healthful and temper- price and my neighbor should be 
ate. The summer heat tempered faithful and punctual in the perform- 
with a breeze. The nights cool, ance of his promise, and perform 
Winter short and mild, with only a the work as specified, but after he 
few sharp cold days. Spring opens had it done, he should say to me, 
about tlm first of March annually. “I have not been recompensed for 

my labor,” and I am also aware of 
1 x " ' .. .... the fact, and I say to him, “A bar- 

1 lie coal measures underlie lully J gain is a bargain,” would it be 


seventeen thousand square miles of r jrrht? would I be doing justice to 
the eastern portion of tne State. m y neighbor? 

The upper stratum crops out in It seems to me that the Scriptures 
nearly every county in the eastern artJ ]p- e a p a | r of balances, which 
and middle portions of the State. we ever have before our eyes, which 
Coal is to be lound in inexhaustible ua when we deal justly or un- 
quantities and superior quality. justly, either with God, our fellow- 
SALT - men or ourselves, and if under cir- 

Under the act admitting Kansas ; cumstances as the above we look 
into the Union as a state, twelve upon these balances, what would 
salt springs were granted. The brine they indicate? Would they not say, 
arising from the springs, in being Thou canst have no more commun- 
scientitically investigated, has been ion with thy God until thou mak- 
foiind to yield a large per^entrige of est reconciliation with thy neigh- 
salt. Many other springs have bor. This would be terrible; to 
since been discovered. Owing to think that we were cut off from corn- 
railway facilities, thus opening up in union with God. But if on the 
a ready market, and furnishing I other hand I make reconciliation 


with my neighbor and then look 
back upon the balances and see 
that they are held in balance by a 
white stone with a new name on it 
that no man can read, save he that 
receiveth it; how sweet, flow pleas- 
ant and how blessed the thought. 

J. B. McConnell. 

From the Pilgrim. 

Advice to Young Christians. 

Youwhohave espoused the cause 
of Christ, let me urge you to be 
faithful — be faithful until death, and 
the promise is, you shall receive a 
crown of life- To do this, you must 
watch and pray that you enter not 
into temptation. I would urge on 
you the necessity of prayer. Prayer 
is the life and soul of a Christian. 
Have stated seasons for prayer; at 
least twice a day approach the throne 
of grace, and call upon your Savior 
to help you overcome sin, and be 
a true Christian, he will strengthen 
you, and cause you to triumph over 
your foes. Seek to be useful. God 
has given us talents ; do not bury 
them in the earth, but employ them 
in trying to win souls to him. Think 
what you owe him. He has redeem- 
ed you with his own precious blood, 
and will you not give him the ser- 
vice of your life ? 

Every one has an influence in the 
world for good or evil. Will you 
cast yours on the side of God and 
heaven? We have nothing worth 
living for in this dark unfeeling 
world, if we have no hope beyond 
the grave. Heaven is truly worth 
striving for. If we have no inherit- 
ance in that beautiful city in heav- 
en, how can, or will we stand before 
the bar of God with a seared con- 
science, and hear the great God 
say, “ depart, I never knew you.” 
What agony, what torture to our 
souls ! 

Let us as Christians journey to- 
gether to that celestial city, and 
when we stand before the great 
tribunal of right and wrong, it will 
be, “ well done, good and faithful 
servant, enter into the joy of thy 
Lord.” Could I bring the whole 
world into the church of the living 
God, I would, but some will not 


29 


1872 


HUEHR^XjID OH 1 TRUTH. 


take warning until death places his 
cold, icy fingers on them. Then it is 
too late, they have rejected God’s 
Holy Spirit, and will have to en- 
dure the tortures of a misspent life. 

Work therefore, while it is call- 
ed to-day, for the night cometh 
when no man can work. I feel that 
I have an inheritance with God, that 
my name is written in the Lamb’s 
book of life. I feel if I was called 
upon to render up my stewardship 
here below, I would be resigned to 
yield all, for the sake of one who suf- 
fered everything, even death, that 
I through his death might be saved. 

^ m ^ . . 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Our Time Is Short. 

“But this I say, Brethren,” says Paul, 
"the time is short. It remaineth, that both 
they that have wives be as though they had 
none; and they that weep, as though they 
wept not; and they that rejoice, as though 
they rejoiced not; and they that buy, as 
though they possessed not; and they that 
use this world, as not abusing it ; for the 
fashion of this world passetli away.” 

“Remember how short my time is,” says 
the Psalmist. "We spend our years as a 
tale that is told.” “ As for man, his days are 
as grass; as a flower of the field, so he flourish 
eth: for the wind passeth over it, and it is 
gone: and the place thereof shall know it no 
more.” "Man that is born of a woman is of 
few days ; he cometh forth like a flower, and is 
cut down : he fleeth also as a shadow, and con 
tinueth not.” But life is long enough for the 
accomplishment of the great ends designed 
by God. 

Brief as is man’s lease of life, it is never- 
theless long enough to dispose of his destiny, 
and fit him for everlasting companionship 
with devils, or unending bliss and fellow 
ship with the Father and with his Son, Jesus 
Christ; for an eternity of unmitigated woe, 
or an eternity of uninterrupted happiness 
and unspeakable joy. 

Brief as our sufferings may be in this 
world, they are long enongh to be endured 
with patience and meekness; long enough 
to work out the peaceful fruits of right- 
eousness to them who are exercised thereby 

More than one immortal being with an 
immortal destiny is each moment brought 
forth into the realms of time to engage in a 
short struggle for life, and then to pass down 
to the grave and be forgotten ; and thus 
each moment an immortal soul is born into 
the eternal world, to join the general assem- 
bly and church of the first born in heaven, 
and people of the New Jerusalem, the city 
of the Great King; or to join the assembly 
of the lost in hell, and people the realms of 
daikness, where the worm dieth not and the 
fire is not quenched. 

With no less important history than this, 


the year 1 87 1 has passed away. Its solemn 
bell has tolled a requiem to the silent past; 
its record is with God on high to be disclos- 
ed when the dead small and great, shall 
stand before God, and the books shall be 
opened, and the dead, shall he judged out 
of those things written in the books, accord- 
ing to their works; when God shall judge 
the secrets of men, by Jesus Christ, accord- 
ing to the gospel. 

Time is 365 days nearer the end of its 
course when it shall be swallowed up in 
eternity, and shall be no longer. 

Your appointed time, and mine is thus 
much shorter; we are 365 days nearer our 
eternal destiny ; this much nearer the hour 
of death and the judgment bar. Are we 
this much nearer a better country ? a home 
of rest, a crown of life, and a throne ot 
glory? Each one of us has 8,760 hours to 
give account of to God. Oh ! how many souls 
in the realms of death would give ten thous- 
and worlds like this, had they them to give, 
for this many hours to seek God’s pardon- 
ing grace. „ * * 


Terrible Accident. 


For the IlerulJ of Truth. 

Watch and Pray. 


On the 1 2th of Jan., 1872, the boiler of 
a steam saw mill owned by Jacob Shelly 
and David Dimm, in Lancaster co., Pa., 
exploded, wounding and scalding ten or 
more persons, two of whom, mortally. John 
J. Graham was thrown about sixty feet, and 
blown through the roof of the mill ; one of 
his arms was broken in three places between 
the shoulder and elbow ; all the ribs broken 
from the spine on one side; his head was 
very much bruised, and his clothes torn into 
pieces, lie died in less than an hour after 
the accident. Henry Rumbough was thrown 
about 70 or 80 feet, and was badly bruised. 
He lived but a few days. All the rest are 
doing well. 

John J. Graham was my brother in- 
law, was a man of good health 38 years and 
1 month old. He leaves a wife and four 
children to mourn their loss. Funeral dis- 
course by John Iv. Snyder. 

C. H. Shelly. 

Lancaster Co. Pa. 


filar mb. 


a 


My dear brethren and sisters, this is one 
of the most important dut ies that we have 
to perform while on our pilgrimage through 
this world. The Savior, the Lord Jesus 
Christ, told his disciples to watch and pray; 
and he tells all his followers to do so. We 
must watch over all our thoughts ! O, I 
often thiuk our thoughts, our minds, are too 
much on worldly affairs. Perhaps when we 
go to bed we have our minds fixed only upon 
how to manage the next morning in our 
worldly affairs, and neglect the duty to watch 
and pray ; scarcely take time in the morn- 
ing to thank the Almighty God for the 
blessings we receive from him. 0, my 
dear friends, let us all tty to follow the ex 
ample of David, “Hear my cry, O God ; at- 
tend unto my prayer.” "My voice shah 
thou hear in the morning, 0 Lord ; in 
the morning will 1 direct my prayer unto 
thee:” Pa. 61:1; 5:3. 

My dear and beloved friends, when we 
go to bed our last thoughts should be of 
heaven ; and when we awake in the morning, 
our first thoughts should be likewise. How 
necessary it is that all should deeply and se 
riously reflect upon death, the great change 
that will decide all for the future; then we 
will either be eternally happy, or eternallj 
unhappy. O. then do not delay this import 
ant work. Watch and pi ay ; for soon you 
may be in eternity; flee to escape the awful 
destiny; the world of torment and woe 
while you have life, and health, and strength 
of body and mind. God our Father was too 
merciful to permit his creatures to be etern- 
ally lost or banished from bis presence; lie 
therefore gave us the opportunity, through 
his only begotten Son, to attain eternal life, 
if we repent of our sins, and believe in the 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

Elizabethtown. Pa. 0. J. Rl’TT. 


On the 12th of December, at the house of the 
bride’s father, by Jacob K. Rentier, Peter llirstein , 
of Tazewell county. 111., to Magdalena Beutler, 
of Mahaska county, Iowa. 

On the 23rd of December, by Isaac Rickert, 
Isaac Culp , of Bednunster Tp., to Kate Berger , 
of I’lunistead Tp., Rucks county, Pa. 

On the lGth of January, by Samuel Yoder, 
Joseph Voder, to Sarah Ilartzler, both of Mifflin 
county. Pa. 

On the 18tli of January, by the same, Enoch A. 
Zook , to Rachel llooley, both of Mifflin county, Pa. 

On the 7th of December, in Fulton county, 
Ohio, by Peter Nafziger, Peter Klopfg , to 
Catharine Nafziger, both of the above mentioned 
place. 

On the 10th of December, in the same place 
and by the same, Jacob Kipel, to Marg Roth, both 
of the same place. 

On the 21st of December, in the same place, 
by Nicholas King, Jacob Nafziger , to Barbara 
Weis, both of the same place. 

On the 18tb of January, in the some place, by 
Nicholas King, John Sehmucker , to Magdalena 
Richener. 


v. 

/ 

£ 


t: ft 


On the 3rd of December, of scarlet fever, in 
Jenner township, Somerset county, Pa , Edvard, 
son of John and Catharine Gilbert, aged 1 year, 
1 month and 2 days. Funeral discourse by Bro. 
Jacob Blough. 

On the l'.Uh of December, in Jenner township, 
Somerset county, Pa , of scarlet fever, Joseph, 
son of Edward and Sarah Joins, aged 5 years, 
3 months and 0 days. Funeral discourse by Ju- 
eob Blench. 

On the 10th of December, in Jenner township, 
Somerset county, Pa., of scarlet fever, Anno, 
daughter of Jacob and Mary Spiegle, aged 2 
years. It) mouths and 0 days. Was buried ou the 
21st at Saylor’s burying-ground. Funeral dis- 
courses from Ps. 103, by Jacob Blough and the 
writer. 

On the 23rd of December, i Rache: i daughter o 




HERALD OH 1 THTJTB.. 


|rt. 


Jacob and Mary Spiegel, of scarlet fever, 
aged 5 years, 10 months and 9 days. She 
was buried on the 25th by the side of her sister 
foil wed by many relatives and friends to mourn 
her early departure. Funeral sermon by bishop 
Samuel Blough and tbo writer from Mark 10: 
18—16. 

Ye mourning saints whose streaming tears, 

Flow o’er your children dead ; 

Say not in transports of despair, 

That all your hopes are fled. 

On the 3rd of December, in Mount Joy town- 
ship, Lancaster county. Pa., Benjamin Brenneman- 
aged 70 years and 29 days. 

On the 9th of January, 1872, at the residence 
of his son, in East Donegal township, Lancaster 
county, Pa., 13 ro. Jacob Gerber , < f lung disease, 
at the advanced age of 81 years, 11 months and 
12 days. On the 11th his remains were followed 
by a large concourse of relatives and friends to 
the family burying-ground on the old homestead 
farm. The funeral services were held at the 
house of his son Benjamin, nenr the burying- 
ground by Henry Shenk, Jacob N Brubaker and 
the writer from 1st Chr. 30: 15- 

Death, like an overflowing stream 
Sweeps us away ; our life’s a dream, 

An empty tale, a morning flower, 

Cut down and withered in an hour. 

Our age at seventy years is set, 

How short the time, hoiv frail the state: 

And if to eighty we arrive, 

IV e rather sigh and groan than live. 

Peter Nissley. 

In Knst Donegal township, Lancaster county, 
Pa., David Zook, in the 75th year of his age. Af- 
ter a lingering illness, he was called to his home 
for which he longed. 

He was a tender hearted father here, 

And in his life, the Lord did fear; 

We trust our loss "ill be his gain, 

And that with Christ lie’s gone to reign. 

Ephraim Nissley. 

On the 12th of December, in Woodford county, 
111 , of dropsy of the heart, Christian Cohler, aged 
CO years. 0 months and l'J days. He was not 
buried until the 16th. on account of some of his j 
children living at a distance. II is remains were 
interred in the family burying-ground of Niclio- j 
las Maurer. Funeral services by the writer, t 
from 2 Cor. 5:1, 2. 

On the 20th of December, in Danvers township. I 
McLean county. 111., of nerve fever, Benjamin F. 
Reber, nged 15 years, 8 months and 20 days. 1 
His remains were interred the 22nd at lmhoff’s ' 
burying ground. Funeral discourse by the wri- 
ter from Job 14:1; and Eccl. 7:1. 

Joseph Stuckey 

On the 3rd of December, in Waterloo comity, 
Out., of consumption, Lydia, wife of Benjamin 
Baer, nged 25 years, 9 months and 24 days. We 
have tlic hopes that she left this troublesome 
world in peace with God and now rests in that 
happy world above, where grief and sorrow can 
never come. A funeral discourse by D. Wismer 
from the words, ‘'Where art thou?” Gen. 3: 9. 

On the 29th of December, in Waterloo county. 
Ontario, Abraham Cress man, aged 82 years and 
16 days. II is remains were followed to the grave 
by a large concourse of friends and relatives on 
the 81st to Eby’s burying-ground. He was a 
beloved brother in the Mennonite church. 

On the 2nd of January, in Mahoning county, 
Ohio, Daniel Witmer, aged 68 years and 2 months. 
He was buried on the 4th at Metzlers burying- 
ground, where Jacob Culp and Peter Basinger 
spoke impressively from the latter pari of the 4th 
chapter of Hebrews. 

My children here are yet seven. 

That yet on earth do live 
l beg and pray you so to livo : 

That we may meet in heaven. 

On the 8th of January, iu East Lampeter town 
ship, Lancaster county, l*a., Bro. John S. Landis 


aged 61 years, 6 months and 24 days. He was 
buried on the 10th at Mellinger’s grave-yard, 
followed by a large concourse of relatives and 
friends. He leaves a wife and six children to 
mourn their loss. He bore his sickness with 
patience till death relieved him of his trials. 
His disease was typhoid fever in its worst form. 
Funeral sermon by Benj., and C. Herr, at the 
grave-yard. 

On the 2nd of December, at Fulton Mich., of 
inflamation of the lungs, Emma, youngest daugh- 
ter of Jacob Kindy, aged 1 year, 2 months and 
6 days. 

On the 20th of October, in Montgomery county, 
Pa., Bro. Henry Alderfer. The 22nd his remains 
were followed, by a large concourse of mourners. 
He was a beloved brother in the Mennonite 
church, aged 60 years 1 month and 21 days. 
Funeral discourse by Jacob Landis and John Ilol- 
deman. 

On the 19th of November, in Perry county, 
Ohio, Samuel Beery, aged 69 years, 9 months and 
17 days. He was buried on the 21st at Beery’s 
church. He was sick but four days and suffered 
very much. 

This languishing bead is at rest. 

Its thinking and aching are o’er ; 

This quiet immovable breast, 

Is pressed by affliction no more. 

On the 14th of December, 1871, in York coun- 
ty, Ontario, Henry Wideman, member of the Men- 
nonito church, aged 61 years, 11 months and 9 
days. Buried on the 17th at Wideman’s burying- 
ground. Services in German from Jn. 5 : 25 — 29; 
in English from Rev. 14 : 13. The deceased bore 
his lingering illness with patience and Christian 
resignation to the last, when he told his wife he 
was ready and willing to go. they should live 
well, which were his last words, aud thus he fol- 
lowed his first wife and five children to the grave. 
He leaves a wife and two children to mourn the 
loss of a beloved husband and kind father. 

On the 25th of December, 1871, iu Rockhill, 
Bucks county. Pa., Samuel Gehman. aged 76 
years, 11 months aud 2 days. Buried at Oeb- 
mau’s burying-ground. 'Services by J. Clem- 
mer and John Allabacb. 

On the 26|h of December, at the same place, 
the wife of Jacob Detweiler. 

On the 29th of December, in Bucks county, 
Ph., after a severe illness of about seven weeks, 
Lydia , wife of Jonas Nace, nged 58 years, 1 month 
and 9 days. During her illness she suffered a 
great deal, however she bore it with patience. 
She was much eagnged in prayer. She had a 
desire to depart and be with Christ. O how oft 
did she pray, ‘ O come .dear Jesus, and take me 
lo Thee.” She was buried on the 81st. Funeral 
I services by Isaac Moyer at the house, Abm. F. 
j Moyer and I. Rickert at the meeting-hous^, from 
I Isaiah 3:10. 

On the 8th of January, in Locke, Ind., of scar- 

j let fever, Nellie, daughter of Peter and Hare, 

aged 1 year, 11 months and 8 days. Funeral 
ser' ices by 1). Brenneman from 1 Peter 1 : 24, 25. 

On the 14th of January, in Elkhart county, 
Ind., Sarah, wife of Peter Stauffer, aged 45 years, 
3 months and 21 days. Funeral services by Jo- 
seph Stuckey of 111. in the German language, 
from ,/ob 7 : 16. And Daniel BrenDeman in 
English from Proverbs 27 : 1. The deceased 
was generally beloved and respected. Has been 
| a professor of religion for 24 years. In her 
afflictions she submitted meekly to the divine 
will of the Lord, ,/ust before her expiring breath 
she expressed her desire to depart out of this 
! world of sorrow, and added that the hour of 
i death could not come too soon. “Blessed are the 
I dead which die in the Lord.” 

On the 19th of January, Grace Ellen, daughter 
j of Levi and Margaret Nusbaum, aged 2 months. 

' Services by A. Bigler and D. Brenneman, from 
Job 11 : 1. 

Iu Haw Patch, Noble enunty, Ind., Addie, 
I daughter of Jonas and Rebecca Yoder , aged 1 


year, 1 month and 6 days. She was buried on 
the 11th. Funeral discourses by Isaac Smucker 
and David Hartzler from the words, “Suffer lit. 
tie children to come unto me, and forbid them not; 
for of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 

On the 8th of January, at Hilltown, Bucks 
county, Pa.. Amanda, daughter of John aud Eli*, 
abeth Alderfer , aged 2 years, 11 months and 14 
days. Sermon by John Al'.abach and J. M. Ilal- 
deman, 

On the 12th of January, in Hilltown, Bucks 
county Pa., Sarah , wife of Christian Young, aged 
76 years, 7 months and 8 days, Interred at Lex- 
ington. Sermon by J. M./7aldeman, Sami. Leatb- 
erman and J. Walter 

On the 14th of January, at Doylestown, .Bucks 
county, Pa., Susan , wife of Samuel Myers, nged 74 
years and 12 days. .Buried at Doylestown. Fu- 
neral services in English by J. M. TTaldeman, 
in German by Isaac Moyer and Isaac Rickert. 

On the 29th of December, in Fairbury, Liv- 
ingston county, 111., of consumption Catharine , 
Houshalter, nged 26 years, 9 months and 29 days. 
She was sick 9 months, and confined to her bed 
10 weeks, yet she bore her affliction with patience. 

On the 3rd of January, at Baden, Onta- 
rio, the wife of John Brenneman, aged 32 
years, 1 month and 20 days'. Was buried 
on the 6th at Daniel Schrock’s burying- 
ground. She was a faithful member of the 
Amish church funeral address by Joseph 
Rubi and Peter Litwiller. 

In Deoember. in Hilltown, Bucks county, 
Pa., Maggie, daughter of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth Detweiler. in the 5th year of her age. 

On the 23rd of December, in Hilltown, 
Elizabeth, wile of Jacob D. Detweiler, in her 
46th year. Her remains were buried in 
Gehman’s burying-ground, on which occa- 
sion, Henry Alla bach spoke at the house, 
and Henry Horning at the grave-yard. 

On the 10th of December, in Elizabeth 
township. Lancaster county. Pa., after three 
weeks sickne s of typhoid lever, S. II Hess, 
aged 41 years, and 21 days. He leaves a 
wife and five chilren to mourn his early 
departure. His remains were followed by a 
large concourse of friends and relatives to 
Hess’ burying ground. Services by Benja- 
min Lehman, Chr. Bomberger, John R. 
Hess and John Risser, from Jn. 11 : 25, 26. 

On the 1 2th of January, in Freeland, 
Upper Providence township. Montgomery 
county, Pa , Rev. Abralmm Lnsicktr , aged 
78 years, 5 months and ll days. Was 
buried on the 16th, in the presence of a 
large number of friends and relatives. 

fitters Uccctltcb. 


J M Brenneman, J M Snavely send your old ad- 
dress, J R Iloffer, D J Slabach, Jos Engel, Jos 
Stahly, Jos Alwine, Jos Detweiler, D Brubaker. 
A Shifler, J M Greider, S Hess, P Roulet, Mary 
Schrock, C C Beery, Jacob Culp, David AVhisler. 
Eli Schrock, J P Speicher, C Z Boiler, A M Kaufl 
man, Jac Hess. Geo Beery, D J Miller, J 1» 
Ilershey, Sol Eby, C Lantz, Anna lteagy, J N 
Brubacher, J D Troycr, C Stoner, John Foell M 
G Fly, B E Schrock, T Denlinger, L C Hencler, 
W C I.ivcngood, P G Wenger, J B Bare, Chr Mil- 
linger, It N Kratz, J Hildebrand, Elizabeth Iteist. 
E Suter, J ltiehl, J U Amstutz, Eli Yoder, Jos 
Alwine, S B Truax, J D Ilertzler, J S Thomas, 
Jao Riniker, Ulrich Hege, J F Naffziger, Jost 
l Bally, Jacob Kauffman, D Gehman, B F New 


1872 


02? TRUTH. 


31 


comer, Abm Means, A Winger, Abm Blosser, 
Christian Schmidt, D Basinger, J II Byler, Mary 
Yoder, C S Pickle, Jacob Bowman. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — T S Augspurger 60cts ; C Augspurger $1 
10 ; C K Augspurger, 85cts ; Jos Augspurger 
75cts ; S Auker $1 50 ; John U Amstutz S3 25 ; 
Jos B Allebach $1 12 ; Jos Augspurger $7 20 ; j 
Maria Auker $1 50 ; Moses Augspurger $2 50 ; \ 
Michael F Achey lOcts. 

B — Elizabeth Beuller Si 50 ; J J Berntreger 
95cts Jos Blanch $1 50 ; J Basinger $1 ; 8 K 
Bare $2 55 ; D Berpe $2 ; Daniel Byler 20cts ; j 
I II Blosser lOcts ; Mary llclsly lOcts ; Joseph ! 
Beery $1 ; Joseph Beidler $10 ; Jos Bamugart- ! 
ner $2 ; Jacob K Beitler .$13 CO ; A Burkholder j 
35cls ; John II Bishop $1 ; Jos II Bergy $4 95 ; 

J Bowman $1 ; G F Boiler $1 ; Samuel Buck- 
waiter $2 ; Chr Bomberger $2 25 ; S M Burk- I 
holder $2 ; John Baer $10; John Bulky $2 75 ; 
John Baer $3 ; Chr Brenneman $1 GO ; Gabriel 
Baer $15 20 ; A L H Bowers 12cts ; Henry Block 
30cts ; J Brand $5 35 ; C B Brenneman $1 ; Chr 
Birkelbach $1 ; G Brenneman $2 50 ; Salome 
Bergy $1 15; Samuel Book Si 50; Samuel Bally 
S3 50 ; J Barlsey $1 ; Chr Brenneman $12 60 ; 
Jacob Bowman $5 70; Jacob Baumgartner $2 ; 
Teter Baumgartner $1 50 ; Jacob Bender $1 50; 
George Breuner lOcts ; Jost Bally $5 ; B Bow- 
man $5 ; D Brunk $1 ; S Baecliler $1 20 ; An- 
drew Barkey $1 50 ; S Retzner $2 10 ; Abin G 
Burkholder $ ; i 30 ; H H Blanch $2; John Bitiga- 
man $1 30 : Daniel Bender $1 ; S II Bally 15cts. 

C — Jos Culp 50cts ; Winey & Custer SI 85 East 
Salem Juniata Co Pa ; Jacob L Ca«sel $1 ; Dan- 
iel Clack $1 10 ; AC Crater $3 1(J ; Peter 
Cbrisiopbel $1 ; James Coyle $3 50 ; Abm K 
Cnssel Si 50 ; Christian Clnuden $1 10. 

D — Tobias Denlinger $2 80 ; Mary Deardorf 
$150; Lydia Detweiler $1 send your P O ad- 
dress ; Ann Detwiler $1 ; Henry Denier S3 ; 
C F Detweiler $8 50 ; Samuel Det wrier $2 ; Lyd- 
ia II Dohner $1 60; Jona3 Detwiler $1 60; A 
F Detweiler fillets ; Louisa Delfaven $1 ; Jos 
Detweiler $1 50 ; Adam Detweiler $4 ; George 
Detweiler $6 ; Tobias Denlinger $1 20 ; Henry 
Detweiler $1 ; Peter Donncr $1 10. 

E — S Ebersole wid $6 50: Elias Eby $3 ; Abm 
Escbleman $3 15 ; S E Ebersole $1 50 ; Christian 
Engel $1 : Sami II Erb $2 ; Adam Eaby $3 25 ; 
E II Eberly $2 ; Sand Eshleman $1 LO ; Chr 
Eshleman $1 ; Jacob Eberbard $1 50 ; S J Eby 
$22 50 : John Egli $1 30 ; Jos Engel $6 ; Mat- 
thias Eby $1 ; J II Esbenshade $1 ; Seth Eby 
$1 GO- 

F — John L Frick $1 ; George Funk $1 40. ; J N 
Funk $1 20. 

G — H Iv Godsebnlk $1 ; J Gartnan sr ; 
Abm Giliom $1 85 ; P Gerber $! : Plrebe E Gib- 
bons lOcts ; Charles George $1 ; David Gross $1 
70 ; GW Groff $1 25 ; Christian Gerber $1 ; 
Samuel Guengrich $7 ; Maria Gerhardt $1 60 ; 
II Gerber $1 50 ; Isaac Good $3 65 ; Chr Ging- 
rich $1 40 ; Tobias Gnscho $1 60 ; Rev Win 
Gray bill $4 : S Gehman $1 : J G Grnybill $1 50; 
P S Graybill $1 ; C S Grnybill $1 ; Pro .1 S Grav- 
bill $1 ; Sami Guengrich $2 20 ; Jacob Gerip 
$1 ; Samuel G Grove $1 80 : Samuel Graybill 
$1 70 ; Joseph Good $1 59 : David Gehman Si ; 
G Giger lOcts ; J P Guengrich 75cts ; .1 M Gold- 
smith $■> ; A A Good $1 60 ; Christian Good $1 : 
Christian Gerber Si ; Chr Guengrich $2 50 ; Jos 
B Gerig $3 ; Magdalena Gingrich $1 ; Chr Ger- 
ber $4 60 ; Peter Gantz $1 60. 

H — J II Hagey 70cts ; Benj Hartzler S i 20 ; 
C Hendricks P M $1 ; Chr Hess $1 50; Abm 
Ilershey $1 ; It J Heatwole .$2 ; .1 Hartman 
SQct.s ; .1 03 Hieser $2 ; U Ilertzler $1 60 ; Jacob 
Bolter $6 : SS Hartzler lOcts; John liege 50cts; 
Jacob Headings $1 10 ; Jacob Horning Si ; Mar- 
tin R Hess 35cts ; Samuel Horner Si : John 
lleckleman Si ; Jacob L Hnver $1 ; David Dooley 
$1 ; Mngdalena Ilershey Si 60 ; Samuel Head- 
ings $2 80 ; E Hoohstetier Si 50 ; S Z Hunsber- 
ger $1 50 ; J Hartman $1 60; C S B Herr $1 


; John 
Wm D 


D Ilerr $2 CG ; John Hartzler $6 ;*Abm S Herr 
$1 ; Maria Flunsberger Si ; I J Hartzler $1 50 : 
Chr B Hess $1 ; David Ilershey $3 75 ; Jacob 
Hauter $1 ; J K Hartzler Si 50 ; Aaron Holde- 
mnn $1 ; Lewis C Henely $8 ; Sami Hallman $8: 
P Hofstetler $3 60 ; Martha B Hiestand SI ; 
Geo Hoffer $1 ; Chr Hershberger $2 ; Eusebius 
Ilershey $1 50 ; Anna Herr Si 50 ; Benj Huber 
Si ; J Hildebrand SO 12 ; J M Haldeman $2 50: 
John Hngey Si ; .1 B Hertsler SI ; Josiah Ilershey 
$5 ; Davia Ilub.ir $1 : Jos Hartzler $1 63 ; Jos 
Ilershey $11 38 ; Barbara Ilershey S2 ; Sami 
Hess S3 ; J D Ilershey $1 ; John llaldemnn sr 
Si 60 ; Nicholas Ilildy So ; Isaac Ilonsberger 
$3 15 ; C L Hoover $2 10 ; A Hershberger $2 
50 ; Isaac Hoffer $5 ; J P Hostetler $2 ; John 
Hartzler $1 5() ; Peter Hess COcts. 

J — Mary Johns lOcts. 

I — Peter Imhof $2 50 ; Mary Imhof $1 
Imliof $1. 

K— John Keller S3 ; C S King 85ct? ; 

Kindig $3 35 ; N H King $2 50 ; C II King Si 
50 ; J F Kinzinger $1 ; Martin Keagy S3; Jacob 
Kratz Si 50 ; B F Kautfmann $3 ; Jonathan Kolb 
$12 10 ; Jacob Koenig Si : Jacob Kurtz $1 60 ; 
J Kilmer 75ct.s ; Joseph Kulp Si ; Mary Kin- 
singer $1 50 ; Chr Kauffman 75cts ; David Krei- 
der SI 50 ; David Kcim $2 10 ; Isaac King S3 ; 
Henry Krupp $1 50 ; Chr Krebbiel $4 ; Cln 
Kinsinger $1 25 ; Jos Klopfenstein $1 ; Jacob 
Kratz $1 50 ; John H Kci.agy Si ; Wm Krupp 
S3; J II Kreider $9; John King $1 ; Peter 
Kinsinger Si 50 ; Jacob Kindig$l 10: J C Kenn- 
gy $2 60 ; Michael Kratz Si 75 ; David Kenagy SI . 

L — P S Lehman Si 50 : Jac Lntsbaw $2 ; Pe- 
ter Lehman $1 ; Cath Loticks Si 10; Jacob Lobe 
5Clcts : Benj Legron $1 50; Peter Lehman $2 ; 
Jonathan Lantz $1 ; Jacob Lehman Si 50; John 
Luginbnehl Si 60 ; Alary Landis $1 60 ; H C 
Landis $2 50 ; J D Landis $1 50 ; R Latter $1 : 
B Lauer $1 : C K Lapp $1 10 ; P P Lehman $15 
75 ; P Litwiller $1 ; Jacob II Landis $12 ; Iletth 
| Ann Landis $1 ; David Lefever S4 26 : Benj 
j Lapp 25cts : Harrison Long Diets : Isaac Loucks 
I $2 ; Levi Z Lantz $1 ; Samuel Lantz. $1 60 : 
Isaac Loucks 85cts : D H Landis $2 : D Lntsliau 
$2 ; Chr Lehman $1 ; Geo Lehman $1 ; Henry 
Lepavd Si. 

M — S SMnst S3; CK Mast $1 50: John Millet 
$1 60 ; II A Almi’.ma OOels ; Henry Aliller lOcts : 
■I M Miller $» : C AIou er $2 ; Solomon Millet 
j $1 60: Jer AI Aliller $1 ; Martin Miller sr Si 
j 5J ; II Alusselmnn $1 ; Christian Miller $1 20 : 

: Levi Martin $1 35 ; R Alo«er $1 ; Levi AIusscl- 
man $1 25 ; John Musser $1 75 ; Danl S Millet 
I SI ; II M Mayer SI : A igusta A Mint r 5(>cts : 
J II Moyer $1 ; Chr IV Moyer Si 50 ; J J Alar- 
} her 20c ts : II Musselo m $2 86 : John E Millet 
j 7<lcf? ; Esthrr Miller $1 50 ; Wm G Moyer $ i 60 t 
I Tobias Miller $1 10 ; M T Miller Si 50 : J. hn R 
[ Miller $1 50: Moses Martin $1 23; Daniel 1 
[ Miller l5cts ; Chr A Miller §2 ; J A! Alylin Si 
: 5() ; Peter Marlin Si ; Peter J Miller Si U) • 
Daniel J Miller P5cts; Abm Miller SI 70: Chri-t- 
inn S 'filler St! : Chr Milt t !().-ts ; Isaac Moye.i 
j $7 60 : Isaac Mast $1 : Abm Metz Si 63 : Jos .1 
j Miller $ | ; Louisa Mourcr $1 ; Alartiti Mellin- 
gr r S3 60 : J 3 ALienor 20cts; Edwin Alatlit 
; 75cts ; E R Aliller S7 60. 

N— 0 B Nissley $| : E X Ni-slry Si : Peter J 
Nafziger $1 60 ; Benj F Newcomer S ! * 0 : Jacob 
Nafz.iger 20c I a ; John Nusbaum SI ; J Xusbamn 
sr Si 60 : J Nusbaum Jr $1 ; Jacob N Neff $J 
6(1 ; Jos N’eiswandcr SI 50 ; .Abm Void $5 ; I’etei 
Naf./.iger S 1 ; Anna Nnfziger $2 : David New. 
I comer $2 !’() : Peter Nissley S| ; K N Nissley $ 


11 8 XissUy $1 

$1 ; Ja 


60 : Ahoi Nash $1 
861c ts. 

0 — John ' Jberholtzer 
$7 80 : J it Oft holt $ 2. 

P— C J Plank $3 35 ; CJ PI title v 
Pike $1 f<) : Davi 1 Plank $< 60. 

R — v Rosenbergor 2()cts ; N E l>i 
F A boss $1 10 ; AI D Hogg 10ct 


S W Nt 


b Oherhol 


t 2:»c»s : 
Jo. '.at 5. in E 


$1 75 ; J C Ruft $4 ; II B Rosenberger $1 ; Mar- 
tin B Rcssler $1 fO ; Jon E Riehl $150: Christ- 
ian llisser S3 ; Jos Rich Si 50 ; Wm B Ritten- 
house $26 ; Isaac Rickert 75cts ; Ferdinand Roth 
Si 10 ; Rudolph Reiff $1 6(1: Jucoh Rosenberger 
Si 10 : Chr Ruvenncht $2 SO ; Isaac Ruth $1 ; 
l’ctcr Ranter S3 25 ; 7/enry Rohrer S2 ; Jacob 
Rosenbcr Si 10 : Joseph Roggy $1 10 : Mary 
Ann Roltrer $2 CO ; Jacob Riehl $8 ; H S Reist. 
50cts. • 

S — P E Stuckey $1 60 ; S D Schrock SOcts ; 
G Streit $2 ; F Scbwarzentruber $1 ; Nicholas 
Sleeker Si : Alichael Souder $9 ; Daniel R 

Stauffer S2 75 ; J S $1 ; Jolm Stauffer 

$1 50 ; Jacob Summer $1 , Abm Schneck $2 ; 
M AV Shenk 70ct* ; Jacob Smith $1 JO : John 
Schwartz $3 : Matthias Strohm 75cts ; Samuel 
Stofer Sr Si ; Jacob Sharp S5 CO : Andrew Shenk 
35cts ; Wilt P Stauffer $1 ; H S Stauffer $1 50 : 
J II Steckley $3 70 ; Samuel S Sltupe Si 15; 
Geo Rwartley $2 ; John D Schrock $| ; C Stuckey 
$2 50 ; Alichael Swartz $i 10 ; Philip Stauffer 
$3 50 ; Jos Schmidt $1 10 ; Alichael Shenk $1 ; 
S Sieber $1 ; Jos Sieber SI : D Sieber $J ; Abm 
Sieber $1 ; J Sieber $2 ; J Shelley $ > 25 ; C G 
Shelley $6 60 : J Sbnllcnberger $2 60 : .Tona 
Stauffer $1 ; 7/annah Strohm $1 ; Joseph Shank 
SO ; 77enrv Strnsler $2 50 ; C Stuckey $1 ; Mary 
Stauffer Si ; Abut Stryckler Si 50 ; Ji lin Schott 
$2 ; Elias Snyder $31 ; Geo Shupe 12cts ; John 
Stoltzfus $3 ; 77cnry Snavely Si ; John Slienk 
$1 ; Joseph StouiTer $1 : Aioses Schrock Si ; 
Ann Stoner $1 ; II Slutnk 60cts ; Jos Stoner $1 ; 
Peter E Stuckey 50cts : J Sloneker $1 60 : John 
Shenk $3 ; B 77 Snavely $2 50 : Jacob Stauffer 
$1 : J D Schrock $1 ; B D Snyder $5 25 ; Abm 
Shirk $2 ; Alargavet Stemen $1 : C Stoner $39 
97 ; J Y Shaniz. $55 20 : J Stahly $1 ; I’re Jos 
Stuckey SI : S Z Sharp $2 ; Anna Stauffer Si 
10 : Samuel Stnltzfu« $5; Alary AI Stauffer Si ; 
Mary Suavely $1 60; Daniel Short ; J p, Son - 
'••nig Si : Am ie Shank 5(lcts ; Henry Stauffer 
$2 ; Addison Shelly S I 50 ; Benj Sprecher Si ; 
Danitd Schmidt- $1 10 : F Skeining $J ; C H 
Shelly $1 *0: John Snyder $1 ; Chritinn Stuckey 
‘Oct'-' ; David Slterk $2 60; Jac Sch wartzentraub 
$2 50; Jacob Smith S| ; (’hr Schmidt So; C 
Stoner paid by Chr Alnyor $| 50 

T — Elizabeth Trover SI CO ; N J Trover Si ; 
John B Tyson $! ; Levi Turner 2 5cts ; 77Trnub 
$1 5(1 : Abm 0 Tschaotz $3 ; Jos Thomas $2 ; 
Abm Tyson Si. 

U — iohn Unzicker $2 30 ; Jac Unzickcr $1 ; 
John Unzickcr $!. 

V — W // Abm Pelt $1 10 ; Carl T Van der 
Smisscti $2 36. 

W — Benj Werrey S2 10 : Jos AVitmer 15cls ; 
.1 Weaver $1 : A Winner $1 10: J M AViseSl 
J ; • t hristian AV'elty Si 10 ; Michael Weber $5 • 
John Wei grr $2 ; Abm Witmcr $1 SO ; Barabnrd 
Werner $•’> 25 it is all right ; J A\ Weaver Si 70 ; 
J J Weaver $2 : .1 II Weaver $2 •’() ; N 0 Wen- 
ger $2 2(i : M Weaver t'Octs : Pro S Winey >s - 2 ; 


Christian Wnmc 
Widehmn $1 32 ; 

Weis -in ver lllefs 
per $| 50 ; // B " eNz $pi ■'() 
J // Wisler $1 ; Jonas Wi.-ler $1 


$1 2(): John AVnyre $| : J 1, 
Abm Wninbidd $3*0; Frank 
Jacob AVitmer $| ; Jos AVen- 
J I! AVelty SI ; 
Sarah Wenger 


Riehl $1 60 ; Elias E Reist $2 : A rue on is Reed 


S| : Chr AViller. $|. 

Y--D S Yoder S| ; C K Yoder sj 60 : N S Yo- 
dcr $1 6(): Jonas A'oder $| ; Jonas C Voder $2 : 
/A nrv A' other “(lets ; Jonas Yoder Si ; Jacob K 
Voder $1 5(1 • David Voder $1 65 ; .) At Ynder 
$1 1(1 ; David P Voder $2 77 ; Noah D Voder S| : 
John (’ Votlt •• $| 50 ; Jos It A’oder $2 25 : Joel 
K Yoder $1 50 : D V A’oder S3 : Samuel A’oder 
$2 : J J Voder S3 : J<>s Yoder $| 50 ; Duvid P 

Y,,!er 5Uc5s. 


Z- 


.1 


•VI ze 
1) • 


Zook 
55 1 

Pot 


Zi 


D J Zook Riots ; Jonathan 
'.i inti' 1 niittn $1 75 : .Adm R 
r SO ; J R.Zook h Co $1 


J B.,Zook A Co 
./e.iibb Zook S2. 


H utv 

,1 11 Zit .. 

nmertnuti ( (lets 

. — JTl.ni Ft i yenbergt r S|5 65 
Ni. u A lit . t ?! ( 5'd ; J G. t devich S70 618 ; Da 
vid Gehman $36 ; Sami Zimmerman $60 ; 77 


u. 


fl 


32 


1 


i 




O? TBTJTH. 


|«b. 


E IIE 


Shank $19 05 ; Chr Nafziger $15 ; J N Bruba- 
cher $60 ; Chr Nafziger $27 90 ; Benj Eicher 
$16 35. 

Letters with no names. One from Beck s Mills, 
with 40cts ; one from Cambridge City Ind., with 
$1 75 ; and one from Chestnut Level for Herald 
for 6 months 50cts. 

TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passenger trains on and after Jan. I4tb, 1872, 
leave Elkhart as follows: 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) 11,20, a. m. 
Special New York Expr., (Main Line) 1,10, “ “ 
Atlantic Express, (Air Line) 9,66, p. m. 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 1,10 a.m. 

Grand Rapids, 4,30 p. m. 

GOING WEST. 

8peciaLChicago Express (Main Line,) 4,36 p. m. 
Night Express, . (Main Line) 2,40 a. m. 

Pacific Express, (Air Line,) 4,00 a. m. 

Accommodation 4,45 r. M. 

Trains for Detroit for the Great Western Rail- 
way leave Elkhart as follows : 

Express, 1>I0, p. m. 

Night-Express, 1,10, a. m. 

ggy All trains run on Cleveland time which 
is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time. 

Sleeping cars on all night trains. 

Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. 

C. F. Hatch, Gen. Supt. 

S. D. BANcaoFT, Agent, Elkhart. 


Books for sale at this office. 

The following books are sent by mail, postage 
prepaid. 

The English Mennonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery, 


at the following price : 

Single oopics, by mail postage prepaid 60 

Per dozen, “ '• “ $8 00 

“ “ sent by expross at purchasers’ 

expense ----- 6 00 

Pocket edition, ----- 75 


The German Spellino Book, a work of 160 
pages, adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those who wish to study the German language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. - - - 25 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers’ ex- 
pense - - ■ ■ “ $2 60 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 
on application. 

We have yet a small number of the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for 75 cents. 

Angenkhme Stunden in Zion. The little Book, 
“ Angenchme Stunden in Zion.” written by Ulrich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 

Ter single copy, postage prepaid, - $0 10 

“ dozen, “ •• - - 1 00 

'* hundred, by express, at purchasers’ 

expense, - - - - * -7 50 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
nguage,w orthy of being read by all. 


German (^techism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath sohools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our office, 
at the following prices : 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ 0 10 
Per dozen, “ “ “ • J ^ 

“ hundred, by express, - <50 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. Walker, D. D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Piice, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of Pride and Humility, Eng. 
and Ger. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 
Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen 75 cts. 
Freemasonry. An essay showing its inconsist- 
ency with Christianity. A pamphlet of 48 pages, 
8vo. Price, 25cts. 

English Mennonite Hymn Book, 

Conversation on Saving Faith, 

(Confession of Faith,) English 
“ “ German 

English -German Testaments 
German Bibles, small size 
English Bibles “ “ 

German Testaments, small size 

*« “ large size, with clasps 1.60 

»« “ with notes 2.00 

English Testaments, Bmall size .16 to .50 

*« “ large size .40 to .60 

Dymond on War .60 

Should Christians Fight? .10 

Peace Manual -60 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2.00 

* “ “ “ German, 1.65 

American Tract rrimer, Eng. or Ger. .40 

German and English Primer .45 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. .25 

Bible Text Book .45 

Bible Reader’s Help .40 

Ahn’s German Grammar 1.25 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklaerung 1.60 

Oehlschlagers Eng & Ger Dictionary, 1 70 

Adlers « “ “ 2 80 

Adlers large “ “ “ by express 7 00 

Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 1 75 

Websters Dictionaries, 76, 90, 1 20, 1 45 a 2 50 
Habermans German Prayer Book 30 

“ English “ “ 30 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 3 00 

«* “ “ German 4 00 

En lish Testaments with notes 1 10 

“ “ Psalms 1 40 

German “ “ “ I 10 

Dictionary ol the Bible, by express 5 00 

»» “ “ Illustrated 1 85 

Pilgrims Progress, English or German 75 

History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 65 

Huebners Bible History, English 1 75 

Fleetwoods Life of Christ 3 75 

Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 1 50 

Menno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 2.25 

Unparteiisches Gesangbuch, with clasps 1.60 

Gemeiuschaftliche Lieder-Sammlung 

(mennouitisches Liederbuch) .60 

Unparteiische Lieder-Sammlung 
[ (amisches Liederbuch) .60 

Spiegel dcr Taufe (Ger.) [40 


Ernsthafte Christenpflicht 65 

Johann Arnd’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arnd’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradics Gaertlein, &c. 3.50 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 25 

Bibles, 1 00, 2 00, 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 
per volume by express 4.00 

Health, or how to live 1.25 

Brown’s Pocket Concordance 60 

Mind and Words of Jesus 60 

Morning and Night Watches 60 

The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or German, by express 3.75 


For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each year bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.65 
The three years together in one volume, 
by express $3.50, by mail $4.00. 


MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 
Funk’s sons. 

Price per single copy, Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

«* *« “ “ prepaid 14.60 

THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush .and Kieffer. 

Price per single copy, postage prepaid, $0.60 
“ “ doz. .6.00 

THE CHRISTIAN HARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 36 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Musjc. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, $2.75. 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnson’s system for 
learning to read music is unsurpassedby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $12. 

Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, We will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices- 



A Religious Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK &. Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $1,00 a year in 
either language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Persons subscribing should be particular 
state whether they wisti the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies sent free. 
Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

Hlkhart Ind. 


$ .60 
.75 

.60 

.76 

1.00 

1.00 

.20 


Mennonite Book Store, Bo* and Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 



Yol. 9.— No. 3. 


ELKHART, INDIANA, MARCH 1872. 


Whole No. 99. 


The Day Is Near. 


8. 8. BREWER. 


All hail ! the day is near, 

When our triumphant Head 
In glory will appear, 

To wake his sleeping dead. 

What if some, long have lain 
Death’s captives in the grave ?J 
The Conqueror comes again, 

In power and might to save. 

The saints in death’s domain 
Shall hear his mighty voice, 
And rise with Christ to reign, 
Then evermore rejoice. 

Lord, help us now to live 
Obedient to thy word, 

And when thou com’st may we 
“Be ever with the Lord.” 


For the Herald of Troth. 

Try the Spirits. 


“Beloved, believe not every spirit, 
but try the spirits whether they are of God; 
because many false prophets are gone 
out into the world.” 1 John 4 : 1. 

We read in the Holy Scriptures of two 
kinds, or classes of spirits, namely good 
and bad, and of two classes of people, good 
and bad, or pious and wicked, or children 
of God, and children of the world. We 
also read in the Bible of two ways, a narrow 
way and strait gate; a way narrow and 
difficult, and it represents the difficulty of 
entering on a religious life, or beginning 
hastily to obey God ; the other is a broad 
road and wide gate, easy to enter, requir- 
ing us only to follow our own depraved in- 
clinations. On one of these two ways all 
the people in the whole world travel; 
but the places to which these two ways 
lead are very different and disimilar. There- 
fore has our beloved Savior spoken the fol- 
lowing words, which we find recorded in 
Matt. 7:13, 14. “Enter ye in at the 
strait gate ; for wide is the gate, and broad 
is the way that leadeth to destruction, and 
many there be which go in thereat: be- 
cause strait is the gate and narrow is the 
way, which leadeth unto life, and few there 
he that find it,” or go on in the way of life. 
The truth is contrary to what many teach ; 
therefore beware, and avoid false teachers 
and prophets, which come to you in sheep’s 


clothing, appearing in the character of true 
teachers, but inwardly they are ravening 
wolves, selfish, greedy of gain, and disposed 
to plunder. 

As Jesus “ went through the cities and 
villages, teaching and journeyiug toward Je- 
rusalem; then said one unto him. Lord, are 
there few that be saved ? And he said unto 
them, Strive to enter in at the 6trait gate : 
for many I say unto you, will seek to enter 
in, and shall not be able.” As we might 
say agonize or make immediate and strenuous 
efforts to enter in at the strait gate, and 
shall not be able ; that is, they do not seek 
in season, nor in a proper way. Thus the 
Savior answers the question virtually, al- 
though not directly. The striving of men 
to enter the way of life, is the means by 
which God enables them to do it ; while the 
neglect of this till death, renders 'it certain 
that they will never enter in, or take a step 
towards heaven. 

“ When once the master of the house is 
risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye 
begin to stand without, and to knock at the 
door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and 
he shall answer and say unto you, I know 
you not whence ye are; then shall ye 
begin to say, We have eaten and drunk in 
thy presence, and thou hast taught in our 
streets. But he shall say, I tell you, I know 
you not whence ye are; depart from me 
all ye workers of iniquity. There shall be 
weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye 
shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, 
and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, 
and you yourselves thrust out.” 

The day of grace is limited, and after it is 
closed forever, those who have neglected it 
cannot obtain salvation. Christ will not 
know them as his friends, because they had 
never been such. They relied on their 
outward relation to Christ ; but ho teaches 
them that this can be of no avail to those 
who have not kept his commandments. 

“And behold there are last which shall 
be first, and there are first which shall be 
last.” These solemn words have a twofold 
fulfillment. First, in this world, the scribes 
and Pharisees stood first in God’s kingdom 
as to their outward nositions and privileges; 
but by rejecting Christ, they made them- 
selves last, while the publicans and sinners 
and the Gentile nations, whom they despis- 
ed, by receiving Christ, became first ; and 
ao it has often been since, and it is so yet at 


the present day. Secondly, in the world to 
come many who have stood high in repu- 
tation and outward privileges here, will be 
thrust down to hell, and many that have 
hero been despised and persecuted, will be 
exalted to everlasting glory. 

The Apostle proposes such tests as all 
might employ, and gives the reason why we 
should try the spirits, when he said, “ Be- 
cause many false prophets are gone out in- 
to the world.” Christ said to his disciples, 

“ Take heed, that no man deceive you. For 
many shall come in my name, saying, I am 
Christ; and shall deceive many.” 

False teachers have abounded in all ages, aud 
sought in various ways to draw away disciples 
after them. Beware of false prophets and 
teachers, who will come as in ancient times, 
under the guise of true prophets and teach- 
ers, among Che people, under the Old Test- 
ament dispensation. 

False teachers have always abounded, 
who, by erroneous doctrines, and unholy 
practices, have brought ruin upon them- 
selves and others ; therefore we should not 
believe every spirit, but try them whether 
they are of God. In order to do this, all 
should carefully and diligently study the 
Scriptures, and should take heed not only 
how they hear, but what they hear; we 
should prove all things by the Bible, and 
hold fast to that which is good. The doc- 
trine and pactice of all religious teachers 
should be tried and compared with the word 
of God. If they agree with this they 
should be received, and if not they should 
be rejected; hence, the richt and the duty 
of every man to be acquainted with the word 
of God, that they may rightly judge and 
act in the matter. 

The beloved Savior teams us cautiously, 
to be heedful, when he says “ Beware of 
false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s 
clothing, but inwardly they are ravening 
wolve9, ye shall know them by their fruits/’ 
That is the nature and effects of their doc- 
trine and conduct. Christ said, “ Not ev- 
ery one that saith Lord, Lord, shall enter 
into the kingdom of heaven, but he that dc- 
eth the wilfof my Father which is in heav- 
en.” Men are not to bejudged by their words 
only, or by pretending to be good Christians, 
but by their principles and conduct. They 
must obey the revealed trill ot God, and to bo 
accepted of him, must do it with the heart. 
The only sure test of true religion, is the 


t* 



HEBALD OB’ TBUTH. 


P»wS 


doing of the known will of our heavenly Fa- i 
ther. 

“ Hereby know ye the Spirit of God ; ev- 
ery spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ 
is come in the flesh, is of God : and every 
spirit that confesseth not that J esus Christ 
is come in the flesh, is not of God ; and this 
is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have 
heard that it should come ; and even now 
already is it in the world. Ye are of God, 
little children, and have overcome them.” 
The false prophets, through whom the spirit 
of antichrist works, seek to seduce you 
from the truth. “ Because greater is he 
that is in you, than he that is in the world.” 
He that dwells in you is God, the 
Holy Spirit, enlightening, sanctifying and 
strengthening you, and thus preserving 
you from the wiles of these false teachers. 

“They are of the world,” the false teach- 
ers are of the world, belong in the spirit to 
the world, and are governed by its princi- 
ples, “ Speak they of the world and the 
world heareth them; ” their doctrine proceeds 
from a worldly spirit, and is woildly in its 
character. For this reason it is agreeable to 
worldly men. “ They are of God,” the apos- 
tles and thoBe who taught like them had the 
SpiritofGod and proclaimed the truth ofGod. 
This they proved by their works, God work- 
ing with them by miracles and gifts of the 
Holy Ghost, Mark 16: 20; Jn. 21 : 24. 

“ He that knoweth God heareth us; he 
that is not of God heareth not us. Hereby 
know we the spirit of truth, and the spirit 
of error.” Here the Apostle has distin- 
guished the true characteristics of the spir- 
its, whereby we shall try them. False 
teaehers proclaim doctrines which are more 
agreeable to worldly men than the doctrines 
of the Bible, and flatter them with hopes of 
heaven though they live in sin. For this 
reason those who love their sins, follow them, 
while those who hate their 6ins, embrace the 
doctrines and follow the precepts of the Bible. 

We may go throughout the country where- 
ever we please, and we find people conversing 
about their cattle and horses ; how fine and 
good they are ; how to train them ; the dif- 
ferent ways of making money ; about politics 


j / * 

ferent ways of making money ; about politics 
and telling foolish, unbecoming stories to 
while away their time, and in particular we 
find this on Sabbath-days, where the neigh- 
bors come together on visits ; or at meet- 
ings, before the services commence they 
stand outside of the meeting-house, talking 
about worldly things, pertaining to their 
welfare in this world. Seldom do we hear 
them converse about the things which per- 
tain to the welfare of their souls; or the 
doctrines and teachings of our beloved Sav- 
ior, Jesus. “ For out of the abundance of 
the heart the mouth speaketh. A good 
man, out of the good treasures of the heart, 
bringeth forth good things; and an evil 
man, out of the evil treasure, bringeth forth 
evil things.” So there are many prophets 
that shall lead the people, and are no better 
than they are. 

Thus saith the Lord God; “Woe unto 
the foolish prophets that follow their own | 


spirit, and have seen nothing” (or 
things which they have not seen)! “ for \ 
such are false apostles, deceitful workers, t 
transforming themselves into the apostles of ( 
Christ ;” that is, attempting to appear like ( 
the apostles of Christ ; “ and no marvel ; i 

| for Satan himself is transformed into an l 
angel of light. Therefore it is no great i 
thing if his ministers also be transformed as i 
the ministers of righteousness ; whose end i 
shall be according to their works,” 2 Cor. 
11:13,14, 15. Satan has ministers who 
pretend to preach Christ’s gospel; they 
make professions of piety and benevolence; 
enter into other men’s labors, and strive to 
draw away Christians from ministers who 
have been instrumental in their conversion, 
and who preach to them the truth as it is 
in Jesus. Therefore is it, that we should 
try the spirits, whether they are of God, for 
there are many who say, “ They profess that 
they know God, but in works they deny him.” 
They show that they have no such knowl- 
edge. Their words and works disagree, 

“ Being abominable, and disobedient, and 
unto every good work reprobate ” (or void 
of judgment); rejected as men given over to 
iniquity, from whom no good work is to be 
expected. Not the profession but the prac- 
tices of men are the index to their charac- 
ter. By their fruits ye shall know them, 
whose end shall be according to they- works. 
The apostle Paul says in Gal. 5:16 — 26. 
“This I say then. Walk in the Spirit, and 
ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh ; for 
the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the 
Spirit, against the flesh : and these are con- 
trary the one to the other; so that ye can- 
not do the things that ye would. But if ye 
be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the 
law. Now the works of the flesh are mani- 
fest,” that is, those to which corrupt, human 
nature prompts, and when not restrained, pro- 
duces the works of the flesh, “which are 
these, Adultery, fornication, unclcanncss, 
lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, 
variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, 
heresies, envyings, murders, drunkenness, 
revelings, and such like; of the which I 
i tell you before, as I have also told you in time 
> past, that they which do such things, shall 
; not inherit the kingdom of God. But the 

- fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long- 

- suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meek- 
i ness, temperance ; against such there is no 
; law ; and they that are Christ’s have cruci- 
r fied the flesh with the affections and lusts ” 
r or passions and lusts. “If we live in the 

- Spirit, ” if our inner life be in the Spirit; 
3 that is, received from the Spirit, sustained 

- by him, and conformed to him in character, 
f “let us also walk in the Spirit,” let our 

i outward life also be in the Spirit, in other 
j, words, let it be conformed to him in char- 
il actor, so that our inward principles and out- 
li ward conduct shall harmonize with each oth- 
s cr. “ Let us not be desirous of vainglory,” 
r that is, of empty aplauses, which puffs up 

with pride, “provoking one another, envy- 
o ing one another;” that is, feeling pain at 

ii j another’s prosperity. 


In the above passages, you can plainly see 
what the apostle Paul wrote of the fruits of 
the Spirit, namely, the good and wicked. 
God is just and holy. “ This is he that 
came by water and blood ” in his baptism, 
when he was, by the testimony of the Fa- 
ther, solemnly proclaimed as the Messiah, 
and Jesus Christ ; in his blpody death on 
the cross, when he made expiation for the 
sins of the world, whi3li was the great work 
of his earthly mission. “ Not by water on- 
ly, but by water and blood ; ” thus testify- 
ing that his work of redemption includes 
atonement for sin, as well as spiritual cleans- 
ing — that without the shedding of his 
blood, there could be no remission of sin, 
any more than there could be communion 
with God and the enjoyment of his love, 
without the inward sanctification of the Ho- 
ly Ghost; “ And it is the Spirit that bear- 
eth witness, because the Spirit is truth,” 
the Spirit that bearetli witness, not only to 
the Messiahship of Jesus, but also to the 
nature of his 'work, as the Messiah. The 
apostle has in view the testimony of the 
Iloly Ghost, not only in his miraculous 
gifts, but also, especially in his inward 
witness in the heart of believers. Compare 
1 Jn. 5 : 10, with Jn. 16 : 14. 

“ For there are three that bear record in 
heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Ho- 
ly Ghost; and these three are one. And 
there are three that bear witmess in earth, 
the Spirit, and the water, and the blood, 
and these three agree in one : ” they unite 
in one and the same testimony concerning 
the character and office of Jesus as the 
Messiah. This is the Spirit which testifies 
and proves, that Spirit is Truth. “ And 
from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful wit- 
ness; the first begotten of the dead, and the 
Prince of the kings of the earth.” The 
first who rose to die no more, and the Lead- 
er, and Head of all who shall be, by his di- 
vine power, raised from the dead to everlast- 
ing life. “Unto him (Jesus Christ), that 
loved us and washed us from our sins in his 
own blood, and hath made us kings and 
priests unto God and his Father ; to him be 
glory and dominion for ever and ever. 
Amen.” A king has his dominion over that 
which he governs. He makes his laws and 
commandments by which the people are to 
be governed, and if they are disobedient 
> and transgress his laws they are punished. 

We too are subject unto Jesus Christ; he 
1 is our king, a Lord of lords, and a Kiug of 
“ kings, and if we transgress his command- 
; ments, and are disobedient unto him, we 
l cannot escape his punishment. It we do 
, not keep the commandments of God, we 
r cannot enter into life everlasting. Jesus 
r says, “ If thou wilt enter into life, keep the 

- commandments.” Love to Christ will lead 

- a man to obey bis commandments. He will 

- neither add too nor take from the Testa- 
' uicnt, nor say it is unncccssaiy for us to 
) keep all the commandments. I say it is nec- 

- essary to keep all the commandments, or we 
t cannot inherit life everlasting. Perhaps 

i some might say, We cannot keep all the corn- 


HEEK/JLLXD OIF 1 TBUTH 


35 



mandments. Why can they not keep all 
the commandments? because they have 
not tried or do not want to obey them. 
In Rev. 22 : 18, 19, we find, “ If any man 
ghall add unto these things, God shall add 
unto him the plagues that are written in 
this book : and if any man shall take away 
from the words of the book of this prophe- 
cy, God shall take away his part out of the 
hook of life (or, from the tree of life), and 
mitoftke holy city, and from the things 
which are written in this book (the New 
Testament). He (Jesus Christ), which 
testifieth these things saith, Surely I come 
quickly.” “ And my reward is with me, to 
give every man according as his work shall be.” 
The great thing requested of us, is love 
to God, and to all men, “ If we say 
that we have no sins wo deceive our- 
selves and the truth is not in us.” Men 
who think they are without sin are deceived; 
aud those who say they have not sinned, 
commit aggravated sin by treating God as a 
liar. And, “He that saith I know him, 
and keepeth not his commandments, is a li- 
ar, and the truth is not in him,” 1 Jn. 2 : 4. 
If we love Christ we will keep his com- 
mandments. A man will always act accord- 
ing to his faith. How can he do otherwise? 
A man cannot act against his faith. By 
the actions of a man we know what his faith 
is. However no one knows, what is in man, 
only the spirit that dwells in him. There- 
fore the best way is, to examine ourselves. 
“ Examine yourselves, whether ye be in the 
faith;” whether you have hastily believed 
in Jesus Christ. “Prove your ownselves. 
Know ye not your own selves, how that Je- 
sus Christ is in you,” by his Spirit, author- 
ity and likeness, “except ye be reprobates?” 
except your faith is dead, your hopes vain, 
and your religion worthless. Let each one 
of us then examine himself carefully and 
earnestly, to see on which road he is 
traveling, and by which Spirit he is led. 
“ For as many as are led by the Spirit of 
God, they are the sons ofGod ; ” “If any man 
have not theSpiritofChrist,he is noneofhis.” 
“ Let us draw near with a true heart in 
full assurance of faith, having our hearts 
sprinkled from au evil couscieoce, and our 
bodies washed with pure water. Let us 
hold fast the profession of our faith without 
wavering ; for he is faithful that promised; 
and let us consider one another to provoke 
unto love aud to good works; not forsaking 
the assembling of ourselves together, as the 
manner of some is ; but exhorting one an- 
other ; and so much the more, as ye Bee the 
day approaching,” Ileb. 10 : 22 — 25. In 

approaching God, Christians should discard 
and reject all mediators except Christ. 
F Ley need no other ; and to trust in anoth- 
er is to reject Christ. As the day is rapid- 
ly approaching, that we shall have to depart 
out of this world, we should uot forget to 
admonish one another, and to encourage to 
love, and good works, so that we shall not 
come short of our salvation: 

Jacob Kilmer. 

I Vineaburg, Holmes Co ., Ohio. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

God’s Commandments. 


“If ye love me, keep my command- 
ments,” John 14 : 15. 

Now my dear readers, I know not 
what may be said upon the above 
text, but I shall endeavor not to 
bring any Rowing or high words 
before you, but simply try, by the 
help of God, to write in as plain a 
style as possible, so as to give an 
understanding as to what Christ 
had reference in this portion of the 
Gospel. It was addressed to his 
disciples, comforting them to stead- 
fastness, and telling them how their 
prayers should be heard. In the 
fourteenth verse of the above named 
chapter, he says, “If ye shall ask 
any thing in my name, I will do it.” 
Then comes the text and gives us to 
understand that if we would be 
sharers of this blessed promise, we 
must needs keep his commandments ; 
in another place he says, “ My com- 
mandments are not grievous.” 13y 
this we may understand that it is no 
burden to the Christian to keep his 
word if the love of God is in our 
hearts. But to be brief: To the par- 
ents he has given the command, to 
bring up their children in the nur- 
ture and admonition of the Lord. 
This we say is a direct command 
to every Christian parent, and short 
of doing this is a violation of the 
laws of God. Now dear parents, 
when we permit our children to par- 
ticipate in all the vain amusements 
of this world, are we not held re- 
sponsible for their blood if they die 
in their sins? If we do not try to 
bring them to the Lord, we certainly 
are bringing them up to that wicked 
one. The command to the children 
is to obey their parents. This is 
the first command of promise to 
them, and any violation of this com- 
mand will not be left unpunished, 
if not repented of. Would to God 
that we as parents would only look 
more to the eternal welfare of our 
children, and see that our little ones 
are properly cared for; then they 
might be gathered in the sheepfold 
of Christ with much less trouble. 
We might pursue this subject fur- 
ther, but fearing lest I might weary 
the patience of the readers of the 
Herald, I will leave this part of the 
subject to our several considerations 
and take up another point, or com- 
mand as 1 term it. Here 1 will try 
to take into consideration the com- 
mand of marriage. In Mat. 19, we 


find that the Pharisees came tempt- 
ing Jesus, and asking him concern- 
ing marriage. He answered them 
and referred them to the beginning, 
where God made them male and 
female. Now in the old dispensa- 
tion, you all will agree that it was 
not allowed to marry from one triba 
of the children of Israel into an-, 
other tribe, much less into the hea- 
then ; read the tenth chapter of Ezra 
and many more places in the Bible 
which I cannot enumerate at present. 
We also^can read, and Christ says, 
it will again be in the latter days 
as it was in the time of Noah. This 
was particularly said, because men 
and women were so carnally minded, 
and would not adhere to the Spirit 
of God. To show more plainly 
that it is against the laws of divine 
truth, we will try to come more 
closely to the point. Now read the 
following questions with a serious 
mind, and perhaps it will be more 
plain. I will first refer you to 1 Cor. 
7 and 9: 5, which reads as follows. 
“ Havewe not power to lead about a 
sister, or a wife, as well as other apos- 
tles, and as the brethren of the Lord, 
and Cephas?” In the 8 th verse we 
read, “ Say I these things as a 
man? or saith not law the same 
also?” 7:39, “The wife is bound 
by the law, as long as her husband 
liveth; but if her husband be dead, 
she is at liberty to be married to 
whom she will; only in the Lord.” 
Now can it be possible that a child 
of God, one who possesses God’s 
Spirit, can be so closely connected, 
to one of the opposite Spirit, as to 
be connected in the bonds of matri- 
mony, when the word of God says, 
those two spirits are in direct op- 
position to each other, and war 
against each other? The word of 
God says no. Now read also Eph. 
5: 22—31, and there 3^011 can see 
that a believer and an unbeliever 
cannot, be so nearly of one mind, 
as the apostle here says they should 
be. Now there is one more mys- 
tery to solve, Why is it that the 
Christian churches have fallen so 
far from the confessions of faith, as 
our forefathers had them? Is it not 
because we are getting too carnally 
minded? Let us consider before it 
is too late. We cannot live our 
former lives over again, therefore 
let ns be on our guard, and keep 
God’s commandments, for we have 
no promise short of keeping his 
word, as it is } r ea and Amen. I 
will quote one more passage of 



V 


36 


HEBALD OF TRUTH. 


Sttarrlt 


Scripture on this point, 1 Jn. 2: 4, 
“He that saith, I know him, and 
keepeth not his commandments, is 
a liar, and the truth is not in him.” 
What an awful sentence, if we 
should be numbered with liars; 
God’s word says, “ They cannot en- 
ter into the kingdom of heaven.” 
Another command is the washing 
of the saint’s feet. I cannot see how 
we dare neglect this if we are his 
disciples, for when he gave charge 
to his apostles, to go and preach 
and baptize, he also tells them to 
teach them all things whatsoever he 
commanded them, and then he 
gives the promise to be with them 
always. In Jn. 13: 14, we read, 
“If I then your Lord and Master, 
have washed your feet, ye also 
ought to wash one another’s feet.” 
In the German translation it would 
be shall , instead of ought , which 
signifies duly bound. So my be- 
loved brethren who are commanded 
to preach, do not be afraid of speak- 
ing the truth entrusted to you, for 
fear of a stumbling block, to some 
one who does not understand the 
word as it is in Christ Jesus. In 
conclusion I would say, If we love 
him let us keep his commandments. 

Josefh Holdeman. 

WaJcarusa , Elkhart Go., Ind- 


For the Herald of Truth. 


The Scriptures answer: by repent- 
ing. “ Repent, and turn yourselves 
from all your transgressions; so in- 
iquity shall not be yourruin,” Ezek. 
18: 30. From that time Jesus be- 


Repcnt. 


and 
sins may 


be 

be 


o 


the eleventh hour, but often the 
hardened heart resists as before, 
and plunges into the unknown fut- 
ure, to serve the master it obeyed 
on earth. Just like Pharaoh, it re- 


e:an to preach, and to say, “ Repent, I sists the powers of heaven, until in 

O 1 - - i -I • _ A I Al. 1 A A Al. 


“ Repent yo therefore, 
converted, that your 
blotted out, when the times of refresh- 
ing shall come from the presence 
the Lord,” Acts 3:12. 

Beloved reader, will you consider 
the above text, and see whether its 
command “Repent ye,” applies to 
you? If so, let us consider the im 
portance of the subject. In the firs 
place we need no argument to con- 
vince us, that there is a life beyond 
this present existence; and the 
Scriptures plainly teach, that it 
will be a life of great felicity, and 
happiness, such as “ eye hath not 
seen, nor ear heard, neither have 
entered into the heart of man,” 
or, a life of great torment, bearing 
an existence with evil spirits for ev- 
er. The place where the former spir- 
its dwell, is called heaven, the latter, 
hell. Now this being true, the 
question arises, how are we to obtain 
heaven, and eternally enjoy those 
untold blessings, or avoid hell, 
with its corresponding agonies? 


the last extremity, when in the 
midst of the river Jordan, on its 
voyage to eternity, it sees the awful 
result, and would gladly return like 
the mighty Egyptian, but the waters 
of death roll in, and alas! the day is 
gone, the night is come, and as we 
have lived on earth away from the 
presence of the Lord, so must we 
spend our minutes one by one in 
the boundless expanse of an end- 
less eternity. 

But Oh! how differently will it he 
with the truly converted Christian, 
the believer in Christ. In that try- 
ing hour he can lean on the arms of 
him into whose hands all power is 
given in heaven and on earth, who 
walked on the troubled waters of Gal- 
ilee, and stayed the raging tempest 
in midnight’s darkest hour, and ex- 
claimed to the terrified boatman, 
“ It is I, peace, be still,” and the 
w r aves subsided, their trouble was 
at an end. Just so in the last day ; 
Christ has the special power to 
save sinners; that was his mission 
upon earth ; God sent him for that 
purpose; “ God so loved the world, 
that he gave his only begotten Son, 
that whosoever believetli in him 
should not perish but have everlast- 
ing life.” 

But, dear reader, would you have 
Christ for your intercessor with 
God at the last day, you must em- 
ploy him now. “ To-day if ye will 
hear his voice, harden not your 
hearts,” you must repent and be 
converted that your sins may be 
blotted out; you must make a cov- 
enant with him, and seal it with 
the ordinance of baptism. To try 
to believe, and not be baptized, will 
not do. Jesus said to John, “ Suf- 
fer it to be so now ; for thus it be- 
cometh us to fulfill all righteous- 
_ . „ ness.” To put off baptism, then, is 

uable; just so in a spiritual sense; ] practically saying that it is not 
let it resist the wooing of the Holy necessary; which is attempting to 
Spirit once, and it is the better pre- make Christ a liar, than which 
pared to do so again; and so on, | there can be no greater blasphemy, 
the oftener it resists, the harder it Since we see then, that it is so es- 
grows, and finally it will resist one sential to the salvation of our 
blow from God s chastening rod aft- souls, that we be baptized and come 
er another, until, on the brink of , into the fold of Christ, w hy put it 
eternity, just before death, some- off? The farther we sail toward the 
times a year, a month, a week, a j cataract, the more danger there is 
day, or an hour, God in his bound- of us plunging into the abyss be- 
less mercy calls and chastens at I neath. Turn then at once; there is 


for the kingdom of heaven is at 
hand,” Matt. 4: 27. “The time is 
fulfilled, and the kingdom of God | 
is at hand; repent ye and believe 1 
the gospel,” Mark 1: 15. “And 
they went out and preached that 
men should repent,” Mark 6: 12. 
The text says, “ Repent ye therefore 
and be converted, that your sins 
may be blotted out.” But are all 
men sinners, and need all repent? 
The Scriptures answer, “If we say 
that we have no sin, w T e deceive our- 
selves, and the truth is not in us.” 
Who can take up the challenge of 
the wise man, when he says, “Who 
can say, I have made my heart 
clean, I am pure from my sin?” 
Prov. 20:9. And again, “The 
whole w T orld lietli in wickedness,” 
1 Jn. 5: 19. 

These passages clearly prove 
that all men are sinners, and that 
all should repent. Permit me then 
to ask you, dear reader, Have you 
repented? Are you a converted 
man, or a converted woman? Re- 
member our text says, “Repent, 
and be converted.” Now if you are 
not converted, can you tell why it 
is? There can not be a doubt, but 
that all persons have at some time 
or other wished to be, or felt the 
necessity of being converted; but 
for some reason or other it is put 
off, from one time to another, 
until the heart grows cold; grace 
withers, and the perishing sinner 
sees no pleasure in the ways of the 
Lord. The older a man becomes, 
the harder his heart growls; this is 
evident from the fact, that not many 
old persons, comparatively speak- 
ing, become converted. 


And it is 
quite natural that it is so: let a 
boy steal but an egg and pass un- 
detected, his heart is the better pre- 
pared to steal something more val- 


r- 


37 


1872 OIF 1 TBUTH. 


no better time to come to Jesus than 
to-day; the same obstacles that you 
find in your way now will always be 
there to keep you back. Satan 
will never relinquish his hold, as 
long as you keep aloof from Christ; 
he is the only one that can conquer 
him, or in other words, crush the 
serpent’s head. Remember also 
that not to serve Christ, is to serve 
Satan; they are antagonisms, and 
we all serve one or the other. The 
Savior says, “ He that is not with 
me is against me; and lie that 
gathereth not with me scatteretli 
abroad.” Come then, the saving Je- 
sus with outstretched hands says 
come. As a hen gathereth her 
brood under her wings, so would 
he gather all the sons and daugh- 
ters of Adam. Let him not have | 
occasion to say unto you, as he did 
unto Jerusalem, “ but ye would not.” 

The Church stands ready to re- 
ceive you, knowing that unless you 
enter in at the door of the sheep- 
fold, but try to climb up some oth- 
erway, you will be considered as a 
thief and a robber. Come then I 
ask again ; should you find the way 
hard, the path very narrow, or your 
faith weak, turn your mind heav- 
enward; look toward mount Zion; 
multiply your prayers, and rest as- 
ured there is power in Christ to par- 
don you. Remember the Savior says, 
“No man can come to me, except 
. the Father which hath sent me 
draw him,” the power does not lie 
in man to come, his is only the 
power to choose, to pray and plead, 
and God will do the work of regen- 
eration. J. R- Buckwalter. 

Buyer stolen , Lancaster Co., Pa. 

For tho Herald of Truth. 

Love jour Enemies. 

Matt. 6: 44. 

Dear reader, to love those that 
hate us certainly requires a changed 
heart. It seems very natural for us 
to love those who love us, and to 
speak well of those who speak well 
of us, and do all the favors unto us 
they can; but it does not seem that 
we feel to do good, and to speak 
well of those that hate us, and 
speak evil of us. We see by the 
fruits of many who claim an inter- 
est in Christ, that they do not seem 
to take much heed to the commands 
which Christ gave in his sermon on 
the Mount. We do not believe that 
Christ would give a command to 
his followers, and at the same time 
ieel indifferent to its being observed. 


{No, for Christ has said, “ Heaven 
j a nd earth shall pass away, but my 
words shall not pass away.” Dear 
reader, Christ has spoken with his 
own mouth a command ; now are 
we prepared to meet God and say, 
That we have loved our enemies, 
and have not spoken a word that 
would prove to make him disre- 
spected in the minds of others? let 
us examine ourselves in the fear of 
God and see upon what subject our 
conversation generally is when we 
meet together. Is it about God, 
about Jesus, and heavenly things 
which are invisible? Do we talk 
about the steadfast faith of a dear 
brother or sister who lias laid off 
their earthly tabernacle, and put on 
the pure white robe, to meet fathers, 
mothers, brothers, sisters, sons, or 
daughters, who have gone before? 
of our troubles, trials, griefs, cross- 
es, temptations? do we confess our 
weakness, our short comings, our 
many missteps, and wrongs we 
have done? Do we speak a kind 
word to help each other on our pil- 
grimage to the heavenly land? Do 
we exhort one another to be stead- 
fast in the faith of Christ and his 
apostles as did the martyrs of old? 
or do we, when we come together, 
talk about our enemies, our neigh- 
bors, the wrong this one has done, 
trying to make all believe that we 
have some influence over those who 
are of a weaker mind, and that all 
are hypocrites who do not believe as 
we do? Oh what a wrong, a shame- 
ful practice is abroad in our land! 

Oh, dear brothers and sisters 
whom I love in spirit and truth, let 
us in the name of Jesus lay aside 
speaking evil of and backbiting 
our enemies, neighbors, and oth- 
er denominations. Speak no evil 
of them. Let God be the judge. 
Let us try to do right; show chari- 
ty to all as our Shepherd left an 
example; let others seek to do 
wrong, but let us by the grace and 
help of God, strive to do right that 
we may not be found wanting when 
we shall have to appear before the 
bar of God. Oh how terrible, how 
lamentable will it be, what a hor- 
ror will possess the soul, when the 
Judge will pronounce the sentence 
upon that soul which has been too 
long amusing itself upon the fault 
of others, to the neglect of its own 
salvation. Oh brothers, I feel the 
| guilt in my own heart I must re- 
ent; I pray to God for a pure 
eart, a heart washed clean in the 


blood of a Savior’s love. I pray to 
be like Jesus in nature, mind, dispo- 
sition and practice. He left his Fa- 
ther’s bosom — I want to leave all 
self; he did good — I want to do 
good; he was faithful to his Father 
— I want to be faithful to Jesus; he 
loved his enemies and prayed, “Fa- 
ther forgive them; for they know 
not what they do,” I want such a 
heart. Oh, let us watch and pray 
day and night that we be not over- 
taken in sin, but purify ourselves 
from all unrighteousness; having 
our conversation holy with all men, 
going on to a state of perfection; 
walking with an eye single to the 
glory of God. May God help us 
all to improve our time in prayer 
and watchfulness, loving eadr oth- 
er as Christ loved us. This is my 
ardent supplication. 

B. F. Newcomer. 

Medway, Ohio. 

For the Herald of Truth, 

Forgive. 

“Forgive us our debts, as we 
forgive our debtors,” Matt. 6:12. 

This passage of Scripture is con- 
tained in the prayer which our 
Lord commanded his disciples to 
pray . The pray er which for proprie- 
ty, soundness and beauty surpasses 
any that has been arranged by the 
wisdom of man. It so clearly dem- 
onstrates the wants of man m this 
world of shadow and gloom; shows 
in such beautiful accordance with the 
Lord’s holy gospel, the dependence 
of man in the Father, and our duty 
to fellow-men; that its force is uni- 
versally acknowledged. In it is 
contained the whole law and the 
gospel. 

From the above quoted passage 
we can infer, that whatever we de- 
sire of God concerning forgiveness, 
becomes a duty toward our fellow- 
man. If we would always consid- 
er prayer to God, and duty toward 
our fellow-men in this light, it 
would save us many a bitter re- 
morse; many a painful thought of 
the past, and many dark forbod- 
ings of the future. 

If any one has been so unfortu- 
nate as to have been wronged, and 
still more unfortunate as not to 
have forgiven when asked; how sad 
the remembrance of the moment, 
when he saw one whom he consid- 
ered his enemy, but who (he now 
knows) could have been gained as 


OF TRUTH. 


m»rrh 


a brother, if the true spirit of love 
had been manifested; he turns away 
with a sad frown upon his face, and 
a feeling of bitter disappointment 
too deep to be described. If he has 
true, Christian feeling, the remem- 
brance of that instant will be so 
vivid as almost to paralyze, him 
for the moment; it will cause him to 
forget all things else, and inuse in 
bitter remorse on the past. 

There may be but few who will 
acknowledge that the above will 
apply to their case. But there are 
numbers who harbor ill-will toward 
their fellow-men, and justify them- 
selves by saying, I forgive you, 
but will not soon forget the act you 
did. Is this true forgiveness? Is it 
forgiveness from the heart? Nonede- 
sire their sins to be remembered. 
If we knew our sins to be remem- 
bered before God, we would not 
consider them forgiven ; nor indeed 
would they be. IIow often do we 


For the Herald of Truth. 

The Covering of the Ilead. 

1 Cor. 1 1 : 3 — 16. 

There seems to have been a great 
deal of discussion as to whether 
the woman should have her head 
covered with anything more than 
the hair or not. Some claim that 


distinguishing characteristic by 
which our sisters may be known as 
sisters. It gives us pleasure when 
both in private and public worship 
we see our sisters conformed to this 
custom of wearing plain caps. 

The Apostle also says in the 16tli 
verse, “But if any man seem to be 
contentious, we have no such cus- 


according to verse 16, the covering neither the churches of God.” 

here spoken of, means nothing a i so seerns to be variously un- 


more than the hair, but evidently 
the apostle, when he says, ver. 4, 
“ Every man praying or prophesy- 
ing having his head covered, dis- 


derstood, and some indeed seem to 
apply it to the very thing about 
which Paul has said so much, as 
though lie,after speaking so pointed - 


honoretli his head,’ means a cover- j an( j earnes tly about the woman 
ing that the man can put on or re- bav i n g her head covered, now yet at 
move at pleasure, and we all know the end, declare, “We have nd such 
that when a man speaks or prays, cus t om neither the churchies of 
uiu. AD luio uuu ^ i either privately or publicly, he „ Tf iWIppH Tspem 

forgiveness from the heart? IS one de- it always with an uncovered * d ' }} would ltumcd/ se m 

Rirft their sins to be remembered does it always wiui an uncmeiea s t ra nge, that Paul, after-Ms earn- 
sire then sins ro Derememuereu. head— that is, he takes off his hat. . ™ roo f and noin ted declara- 
If we knew our sins to be remem- ' ld hp ’ 8 h am e for him to ?. re Pr°°J ana pointea aeemra- 

hprprl before God we would not 11 , i . a tions, should now nullify the whole 

berea oeiore you, " vvouiu speak with Ins hat , on, that is to thin which be tried so earnestly 

consider them forgiven; nor indeed A head covered I which he tried so earnesm 

would thev 1)P How often do we na ' e , . , . e to impress upon the minds of the 

would tney tie. now oneii uo we Now then, Paul is speaking of r • n tbi an s bv savins “ But after 
hear the prayer, “O Father, blot ,, wmiiqn i n inst the onnosite Gormtmans, by saymg, uui ajiei 

out our iniouities* cast our sins 1 1L in .pist tne opposue a iht does not matter, you can do as 

sense from that in which he spoke Would not bis writ- 


out our iniquities; cast our sins 
(trespasses) iirto the sea of forget- ! 
fulness and remember them against 
us no more.” This is the kind of 
forgiveness we desire of God ; but 
the very kind many are unwilling 
to offer to their fellow-men: Yet we 
have the very emphatic language in 
Christ’s holy gospel, “So likewise 
shall my heavenly Father do also 
unto you, if ye from your hearts 
forgive not every one his brother I 
their trespasses.” How can we 
dare ask God to forgive us, when 
we remember that we have in any 
case failed to forgive our brother’s 1 
trespasses; when we ask him to “for- 
give our debts, as we forgive our 
debtors?” And still remember re- 
vengefully, some wrong that our fel- 
low-man committed; we are asking 
God’s vengeance down upon our 
heads. 

We desire God to forgive and for- 
get onr trespasses; to loveandkeep 
us as though we had never sinned. 
So we should forgive and forget 
one another’s trespasses; love one 
another as though we had never 
wronged each other; and be as slow i 
to take offense as though we had I 
never been wronged. “Be ye 
kind one to another, tender-hearted, 
forgiving one another, even as Coil 
for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” 

Rockingham Co ., Va. J. S. C. 

“ ltejoice not when thine enemy fulleth, 
ttutl let not thine heart be glad when lie 
stymbletli ; lest the Lord see it, and it dis- 
please him, ” l’RO V XXV: 17, 18. 


of the man. That is, he is still 
speaking of the same thing, in 
reference to the woman as that 


you please.” Would not his writ- 
ing on this point have been all in 
vain? Most certainly. But we do 
not lind Paul thus writing in vain, 


1 • £% , XX. Jl ut 11 XXX u u nimus. X. XX » * ** i 

of which he spoke in reference to or p or naU ght. He always wrote 
the man, namely of a coveung for w p,h a purpose and so also here, 
the head, i. e. a covering which an q } ie meant to say, “ If any man 
could be put on or removed at "ill, sfiem t 0 v> e contentious we have no 


coma oe put on or removeu at win, geem to be contentions we have no 
and says, But every woman that suc h custom [that our women pray 
prayeth or prophesieth with her or prophesy with uncovered heads], 
head uncovered, dislionoreth her nebber the churches of God,” for 
head, for that is even all one as if this was the fault which he tried to 
she were shaven, hoi if the worn- / , r .™ or ,4- u Tint if e»n\r mnn kpptii 


that 

her 

her 


an be not covered, let her also be 
shorn; but if it be a shame for a 
woman to be shorn let her be cov- 
ered.” Now if as some contend, 
this covering be the hair, and the 
Corinthian sisters prayed and 


correct. “ But if any man seem 
contentious,” not willing to follow 
the instructions which are here giv 
en, let him know that neither we 
nor the churches of God, are accus 
tomed to have our sisters pray or 
prophesy with uncovered heads 


>vophesied with uncovered heads hope these suggestions mayHh 
and this a fault among them which satisfactory to man y who liav. 

l»/-v o ri act I niTi f i mi t l xr nriohoH ta oat » _ _ y . 


the apostle evidently wished to cor- 
rect), then they must already have 
been shorn, and the apostle’s writ- 
ing would have no bearing, for he 
assumes that they themselves con- 
sider it a matter of disgrace to be 
shorn or shaven, for he says, “If 
it be a shame for a woman to be 
shorn” &c. From these facts that we 
must assume that there must be 
some covering for the head other 
than the hair, a covering which the 
woman can put on and off' at will. In 
our church it is the custom for the 
women to wear caps, and we believe 
it is right, and good that our sisters 


been in doubt about this matter. 


Aii Address 

TO THOSE W r IIO HAVE RECENTLY UNITE ! 1 

WITH THE CHURCH IN FAYETTE Co., Fa 
As may be seen in another column of tho 
Herald, it has been my happy privilege, ii> 
company with Bro. J. F. Funk to enjoy ;» 
second visit with the brethren in Fayette 
county, Pa. As Bro. Funk will give tlu' 
particulars relative to our visit, I will not 
comsume time, nor space, in that direction 
Suffice it to say that I cannot sufficient!) 
express my gratitude to God, for the enjoy- 
ment in which we were made to participate, 


should conform themselves to this whilst permitted to mingle in the pleasant 
custom, both in obedience to the associations of those we love as dear breth- 
instructions of Paul, and also as a ren and sisters in the Lord; in uniting our 


1872 


39 


HERALD OF TRITTH. 


hearts and efforts, in the worship of God, 
and laboring to promote his glory and 
honor in the furtherance of his holy cause, 
and the extension of his kingdom in win- 
ning souls unto him. God, we must admit, 
has always been “true and faithful,” in ful- 
filling his gracious promise, “Lo I am with 
you alway,” in our social, and public 
engagements, did we realise his sacred pres- 
ence and blessings upon us. To his name, 
we ascribe all honor and praise. Amen. 

Whilst I desire to say a few words by 
way of encouragement to those of you who 
have long time stood, whether as watchman 
upon the walls of Zion, or lay-members labor- 
ing together in your respective spheres of 
duty, and have borne in a measure, the 
heat and burden of the day, my mind seems 
to be more particularly drawn toward those 
who have but recently come out upon the 
Lord’s side, have enlisted under the blood 
stained banner of king Emmanuel, to en- 
gage ia the contest against spiritual ene- 
mies; for we, who like they, once made a 
beginning in the new life, know how need- 
ful it is that such should be nourished with 
“the sincere milk of the word that they 
may grow thereby.” Let us therefore, if 
so be that we feel the benefits of many 
years of experience in the good work — be 
concerned that our younger brethren and 
sisters receive also of the benefits of the 
same. Let us feel that whenever a new 
convert comes into the church, there arc 
also new duties imposed upon those of ma- 
turer experience. With these few thoughts 
for the consideration of our older brethren 
and sisters, I now turn, by the help of the 
Lord, to address those dear young fellow 
pilgrims, who have but recently declared to 
us in effect like Ruth to Naomi ; “Thy people 
shall be my people, and thy God, my God.” 

Your engagement, dear young brethren 
and sisters, is indeed the most noble, the 
most glorious, and the most needful of all 
others. Y ca it is as the ever-blessed Sav- 
ior declares, the “One thing needful 
without this we would be wretched and 
miserable creatures indeed ; whilst upon 
the other hand, our faithful continuance in 
well-doing, will seem to us glory, honor, im- 
mortality and eternal life. All that we 
need, could desire or ask for, is freely grant- 
ed us upon our obedience to the divinely 
sacred injunctions of the blessed gospel of 
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Prompt- 
ed by a sense of love and duty to God, I 
trust you have been prevailed upon to con 
secrate yourselves to the service of the 
bord ; if this indeed be true, then will your 
service be acceptable with God, whether 
you be able to do much or little. God re- 
quires our willing obedience in all things, 
and blessed thought, that when wc have 
done what we could, lie asks no more- The 
act of the woman, who anointed his body 
with ointment, was highly commended by 
the Savior; he declares, “She hath wrought 
a good work upon me, she hath done what 
sh^ould.” Again, “He that shall give a 
cup of cold water in the name of a disciple 


shall not lose his reward.” Having now 
engaged yourselves in solemn covenant with 
God, and sealed your covenant vows by bap- 
tism, you have reason to feel that important 
duties, and weighty responsibilities are rest- 
ing upon you, such as you will not be able 
to fulfill through your own abilities. You 
will constantly need God’s assisting grace 
and the power of his divine Spirit, by which 
to be enabled to carry into execution, the 
obligations you have taken upon you, as 
soldiers of the cross. Your experience will 
evidently teach you the truthfulness of the 
declaration of the Savior when he says 
“Without me ye can do nothing.” Hence 
the necessity of eonstant, earnest prayer, so 
repeatedly enjoined by the blessed Savior 
upon his followers, with the blessed assur- 
ance that “if ye shall ask anything in my 
name, I will do it.” Then do not despair, 
although trials and temptations meet you 
by the way ; look to Jesus for his divine as- 
sistance. He is able and willing to help you; 
and blessed thought, he is vested with all 
power in heaven and on earth, and him- 
self has declared, that the gates of hell shall 
not prevail against his church. The poet 
most beautifully expresses these thoughts 
in the following language : 

The soul that on Jesus hath leaned for repose, 

I will not, I will not desert to his foes ; 

That soul, though all hell should endeavor to shake, 
I’ll never, no never, no never forsake ! 

Although your lot be cast with God’s peo- 
ple, as in all ages of the world, to suffer for 
his name’s sake, stand firm and unshaken 
in faith. Let not tho scoffs and frowns 
of the world, dishearten you ; but be 
courageous and undaunted in your resolu- 
tions, relying upon the precious promises of 
God’s word in which he says, “Fear thou 
not; for I am with thee : be not dismayed; 
for I am thy God, I will strengthen thee; 
yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee 
with the right hand of my righteousness.” 
Remember also tho words of the Lord Je- 
sus when lie says, “Marvel not if the world 
hate you. Yc know that it hated me be- 
fore it hated you.” “If ye were of the 
world, the world would love its own; but be- 
cause yc are not of the world, but I have 
chosen you out of the world, therefore the 
world hateth )-ou.” 

In view of the above facts, that God’s 
people have always been a despised and re- 
jected people in the eyes of the world, and 
since indeed there can be no affinity, no 
communion nor concord with the children of 
of God and the children of this world, hence 
the Savior says, “In patience possess ye your 
souls;” and the Apostle says, “Ye have need 
of patience.” Then let us not “be weary in 
well doing, for in due season we shall reap if 
wc faint not.” Let us seek to retain in our 
minds the feeling of the poet, who says, 

We’ll fear not the dangers that lie in our way — 
His arm will protect us, by night and by day ; 

All this we must suffer, and patiently bear, 

Till Jesus shall take us where suff'Hngs are o’er. 

In conclusion allow me to say to you. be 
faithful in your devotions to Hod. Neglect 


not the duty of prayer. Search the Script- 
ures ; and acquaint yourselves with the sa- 
cred oracles of God's word ; and thus be es- 
tablished aDd confirmed in the precious 
truth, as it is in Christ Jesus that we may 
be able, by sound doctrine, to withstand the 
gainsayers of God’s holy truth, “and the 
truth shall make you free.” “If ye con- 
tinue in my word, then are ye my disciples 
indeed” says the blessed Savior. Finally 
farewell. The Lord bless you all, and help 
you to be faithful. Pray tor your devoted 
brother and humble fellow-servant. 

Elkhart In<h D. BRENNEMAN. 


For the Her»lil of Truth, 

The Kansas Colony 

While we have no special information to 
give to those interested in the formation 
of the Kansas Colony, we can notwith- 
standing, say that it is progressing, and 
a good many are looking forward to find- 
ing homes there. We expect with the 
opening of spring that something more 
definite will develope itself. Our breth- 
ren in Russia are also, now, more than 
ever, looking towards America as an asylum 
of perfect liberty of conscience, in the mat- 
ter of their non-resistant principles. We 
have just received a letter from there, from 
which we infer there is a probability, that a 
deputation from there will be sent to 
this country the coming summer for tho 
purpose of looking out a place in which to 
settle. Now would it not bo a good way for 
the church here in America, to show forth 
their sympathy and Christian charity for 
those who must leave their native land on 
account of their religious principles, to en- 
deavor, if possible to find a tract of country 
where they might settle and be enabled to 
secure good and cheap homes for themselves 
and their families. Would it not be a good 
idea to try and get them to join in with 
the Kansas Colony? Let all those who feel 
interested in the matter think over it. We 
have simply thrown out these suggestions 
for your consideration. J. 


For the Hereld ofTrath. 

At Home. 

At home once more among my friend* 
To-day I have been found, 

Where God a helping hand doth lend, 
Which cheers us all around. 

At home, his name we once more praise 
For mercies that are past ; 

And may our voices to him raise 
As long as life shall last. 

At home, I feel that God has been, 
llis name I there have heard ; 

And love and peace tve all have seen 
For such be God adored. 

At home again, may wc all meet, 

But if on earth no more, 

May we in heaven each other greet, 

There sing with those of yore. 

At home, at last may we all be, 

With Jesus Christ to dwell; 

Where parting tears we no more see, 

Nor ever say farewell. 

Elkhart , furl. JOHN H. GeiI.. 




40 


lELZEJRALILD OIF 1 TBUTB.. 


ISttarrh 


itralir of irntlj. 


Elkhart, Ind., March 1872. 


To oob SC 88 CBXBKE 8 . — If any of our subscriber* do not 
get their papers regularly, or if any persons who send lor 
books, Ac., do not obtain them in due time, they will confer 
a favor by informing us, and we will do our best to have 
everything properly forwarded to its destination. 


How to bind Monet. — I f in sums more than a dollar, it 
is best to obtain either a draft, or a Post Office money 
order, or where these cannot be obtained, get the letter 
registered. 

— ■ - o 

Those of our subscribers who do not wish to take the 
Herald of Truth any longer, will please to inform ns of 
the fact by letter and pay up all arrearages, and the 
matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it will 
be considered that they wish to continue their subscriptions. 

3Ienno Simon’s Complete Works, in 

the English language are now ready 
for delivery. All who wish to ob- 
tain this valuable work may have 
it promptly forwarded to them, by 
sending in their orders to this office. 
The price of the work is $4.50 cents 
per copy. Any person taking. 12 
copies will receive one copy gratis. 
We have gone to a great expense 
in translating and publishing the 
work, so that our people might have 
the opportunity to examine and 
read the writings of the eminent 
reformer whose name our church 
bears, and we hope our friends will 
feel an interest in selling as many 
copies as possible. Single copies 
of the work may be sent by mail, 
and those wishing to have them 
thus sent will please add G4cts to 
the price for postage. It may be 
obtained at the following places: 

J. E. Barr’s Bookstore Lancas- 
ter, Pa. 

J. C. Hunsicker, Berlin, Waterloo 
county, Ont. 

Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, 
Lancaster county, Pa. 

Jacob Funk, near Line Lexing- 
ton, Pa. 

Our Family Almanac for lST^ is 

now ready for delivery. It contains many 
good and interesting articles, and should 
find its way into every Mennonito family. 
All orders will be promptly filled by mail at 
If) cts. per single copy, or VO cts. per dozen, 
or when sent by Express at §5. 00 per hun- 
dred, Express charges to be paid by the 
purchaser. 

To Subscriber, Bloomington, 111. 
You arc at perfect liberty to give away all 
the papers you wish, on the same conditions, 
an 1 we wish to favor all, as much as wc can. 
Please send vour name and P. O. address. 


Write Plainly. — We have received 
a letter mailed at New Dundee, Ont., con- 
taining one dollar and a slip of paper, on 
which we find the following : 

Died on 1 1 January. To Roseville School. 
Then follows a list of some 13 names. The 
question is, what are wc to do with the dol- 
lar— who sent it ? 

Let our kind friends remember to write 
plainly what they want and where they wish 
us to send it, and also always give plainly 
their names, tost office and state, and 
then we will be less liable to make mistakes. 


before Good Friday, at Brubaker's Meet- 
ing-house, about three miles west of Lan- 
caster City, and on the first Thursday 
in October, at Mellinger’s Meeting-house, 
about three miles East of Lancaster City. 

The Semi-annual Conferences, in Vir- 
ginia will be held on the last Friday in 
April, and on the last Friday in September 
of each year. 

The Annual Conference of the Ornish 
Mennonite Church will meet the present 
year on Whit Sunday, in Lagrange County, 
Indiana. This Conference will continue 
from day to day until the business of the 
Conference is disposed of. 


To Our Correspondents. — We 

feel greatly rejoiced to see our lriends so 
faithful and earnest in writing for the Her- 
ald, and we hope they will continue so to do. 
It will make our paper so much more inter- 
esting, when we have so many to write for 
us, but in this connection we wish just to 
refer to several tilings, which if observed 
will bo of great value to us, while some 
perhaps do not know the facts or have never 
thought about them. Please use a good 
black ink when you write. Do not use red 
or purple ink. We do not object so much 
to blue ink, but the black is always best. 
L'se also white paper, and if you have very 
thin paper, write only on one side. Do not 
write between the lines, but only on the 
regularly ruled lines. The compositor while 
setting cannot have the copy very close to 
him, and if it is so closely written, he will 
not be able to read it without stopping at 
the end of each sentence till he has deci- 
phered another. By observing these rules 
you will often save the editor much time and 
trouble, and thus you will make his work a 
great deal easier. 

By these remarks we do not wish it to be 
understood that we are finding fault. By 
no means, wc only give these hints for our 
future improvement and help. Let none be 
discouraged or deterred from writing; only 
write as often and as well as you can. 

Conferences. 


Sister Rebecca Uartman. 


The annual Conference for the State 
of Ohio, will be held in Mahoning County, 
on the third Friday in May. The nearest 
station is Columbiana, on the Pittsburg 
Fort Wayne and Chicago It. It. 

The Semi-annual Conferences, in the 
Eastern district of Pennsylvania, will be 
held on the first Thursday in May, and first 
Thursday in October, in Franconia Meeting- 
house, in Montgomery County. 

The Semi-annual Conferences, in Lan 
caster Co., Pa., will be held on the Friday 


Our beloved Sister, Rebecca Hartman, 
who died the 3lst of January, in Rocking- 
ham county, Va. (see death notices), came 
to the W cst in the early part of last sum- 
mer, and after visiting sometime among 
her friends and acquaintances, she came to 
Elkhart and made her home with the Ed- 
itor’s family, and worked for some time in 
the book-bindery connected with the Her- 
ald of Truth office. She afterwards taught 
a private school at Bro. Daniel Brenneman’s, 
and while thus engaged her health began 
to fail ; but without any serious apprehen- 
sions, she attended to her duties until her 
failing strength would no longer allow her 
to do so. Shortly after this she again re- 
turned to Elkhart, but still growing weaker 
she consulted several physicians, and re- 
ceiving no encouragement for any improve- 
ment in her health in this climate, she, with 
the advice of her friends, determined to re- 
turn to her parents in Virginia, that if 
possible, under the more genial influence 
of her native home and a milder climate, 
she might be benefited, though wo all felt, 
when the last “Good-by,” was spoken, that 
wc should never see each others’ faces again 
in this vale of tears, and we have reason to 
believe that she too felt that she was going 
“home to die.” With heavy hearts we bade 
her farewell, for we loved her as a dear sis- 
ter in the church, a kind friend, and a pat- 
tern of Christian piety, and were loth to 
part with her ; but God had so ordered it 
and wo would not murmur. Accompanied 
by Bro. John H. Geil and sister Blossor. 
she reached her home, though very weak, 
where the sorrow-stricken parents, though 
oppressed with sadness over the feeble con- 
dition of their beloved daughter, yet re- 
joiced that she was able to return to their 
fond embrace again, though it were but to 
die. After lingering a short time she calm- 
ly fell asleep, as we have reason to believe, 
in the sweet embrace of Jesus. 

She had during her brief illness at times 
much to suffer, but boro her afflictions with 
Christian resignation and fortitude. She 
took a great delight in singing, praying, and 
having the word of God read to her. Sev- 
eral days before her death she was asked 
whether she feared death, to which she an- 
swerod, “O no, it does not appear to mo 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


that I do.” She had a desire to leave this 
world and to be with Christ. Her last 
words were, “Lord Jesus, receive my Spir- 
it,” and calmly fell asleep. She was a 
bright ornament of her profession, was very 
kind-hearted to all around her and was 
respected and beloved by all. She had, by 
her pious conduct, gained many warmheart- 
ed friends, who deeply mourn their loss, 
yet do they not mourn as those who have 
no hope. 

We do indeed mourn o’er departing 
friends, and our hearts are sad when they 
go, but when we have the assurance that 
they die in the Lord, we should uot feel sad; 
we should rather rejoice that their warfare 
is over, that their sorrows, sufferings and 
tribulations are past, and pray the more 
earnestly that God would help us too, to be 
ready for tbo Lord. 

“Lord Jesus, my spirit receive,” 

Thus prayed our dear sister, and died ; 

For her then, oh why should we grieve, 
Since Christ with her wish but complied? 

When asked by her friends whether she 
Of death should have fear, she replied, 

“I do not think that I should be 
Afraid to pass over tlie tide.” 

(fotrcsponismcc. 


that God desires us to have, one towards an- A Visit to Virginia. 

other. O, how I was encouraged, to see so 

much love manifested among the brethren According to request, through the col- 
and sisters in worshipping God; what a joy umus of the Herald, I will give an account 
it caused within me to meet with them. I of our visit to Virginia. On the 21st of 
often think, if it causes so much joy in our November, Uncle John S. Kindy and I 
hearts to meet thus on earth, how much more took the train for Baltimore, but did not 
when wc shall meet in heaven. Let us not arrive there till late. \\ e took the cars 
forget this. What a vast difference tierc is ; next morning and arrived at Washington, 
when we had to remain at a station several but had to remain there till evening. We 
hours, awaiting the arrival of the train, we spent the time pleasantly in viewing the 
met there with all classes; some curse and public buildings, and improvements of the 
swear, some arc drunk, others quarrel, and city. Me arrived at Lisherville the next 
such like conduct. This caused sadness in afternoon, being detained all the way by 
my heart, when I thought of the great day the trains not making proper connections, 
of accounts, when wc must all appear before In this neighborhood we spent some days 
him who will judge a righteous judgment, with Abraham, Henry, E. A. II., and Elias 
Let us judge ourselves that we be not judged Kindy. 

J O .. . • “ , / 1 C> 7.1 XT’- 


I would say to all unconverted, young and | 
old, prepare to meet your God. while the 
day of grace is on your side. “To-day if ye 
will hear his voice, harden not your hearts/' ' 
says the Holy Ghost ; to-morrow it may be 
too late ; too late for ever to think of these 
things. O, how often has the gospel been 
preached to you; it warns you of your dan- 
ger, and still you go on regardless of that 
kind spirit which whispers to you, and tells 
you that you arc going where you do not 
wish to go. 

When traveling in the ears, in company 
I with a brother he remarked when we started 


On Sunday, E. Kindy took us to the house 
of an elderly sister, where there was meet- 
ing; here we became acquainted with the 
brethren Jacob Hildebrand, and Isaac Groff. 
During the week we visited many brethren 
and friends. Bro. A. Kindy went with us 
over the South mountain to Bro. A. Hilde- 
brand. While on the west side of the 
mountain, it was very cold and blustering, 
but soon after we began to descend, it be- 
came calm and warm, and a beautiful scen- 
ery was before us. 

Dear friends, and fellow travelers, Is it 
not so with our spiritual journey ? Are 
there not many mountains to cross, and 


A VISIT. 

By request of some brethren, I will, by 
the help of God our heavenly Father, en- 
deavor to give a brief sketch of a visit my 
wife and I made to Maryland, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio and Indiana. We took the train at 
Harrisonburg, Va., on the lGtli of Oct. 1871, 
and as the train moved off with us, my 
prayer to God was that he would be with 
us, and enable me faithfully to perform that 
work which is given me to do ; that it 
might be done to his honor and glory, and 
for the salvation of our never dying souls. 
L et me entreat you, servants of Goa, to la- 
bor faithfully in the Lord’s vineyard. The 
Savior says, “The harvest truly is plenteous, 
but the laborers arc few.” While so many 
precious souls are traveling on the broad 
road, let us warn them of their danger, let 
us consider the great responsibility that rests 
upon us as ministers of the gospel. The 
apostle Paul saj's, “Woe is unto me, if I 
preach not the gospel.” 

Now there is not only a work for the min- 
ister, but Jesus gives us all a work to do. 
Let us consider what that work is, and then 
examine ourselves to sec if we do the works 
of God. 

O, brethren and sisters, let us all become 
more active in doing the will of our heavenly 
Father; yes, let us exert ourselves more in 
the good cause of Christ, for he has douc so 
much for us. I fear we too often forget his 
goodness. Let us love him with our whole 
heart ; let us have that pure love within us 


that lie was well acquainted with the place to s ^ orms encounter? but thanks be to God 
which wc were going, so I trusted that when t jj ere j s a sumi y side; let us not be discour- 
we arrived at the point it would be all right. a „ e( j but “press toward the mark for the 

i i i a _ i. .1 i.l — .1 0 7 r ... 


we arrived at the point it would be all right 
but we gave no heed to what the conductor 
said, and had it uot been for a sister, who 
affirmed that this was the place for us to 
alight, the cars would have moved off with 
us in them, and the powerful engiuc would 
have carried us where wc did not want to 
be taken. Thus dear sinner, whoever you 
arc, if the Spirit tells you to stop, and God's 
word tells you to repeut, give heed thereto 
at once, or else that powerful enemy of your 
souls will drag you down the broad road to 
ruin. 

I will ask you to read the fourth chapter 


prize of the high calling of God in Christ 
Jesus,” more zealously. Let storms roar, 
waves swell, thunders roll, and lightnings 
Hash, they cannot harm us, if wc are found- 
ed on that immovable Rock, Christ ; there 


eu us where we did not want to I j s a j s0 a swnn y side to cheer, console, and 
Thus dear sinner, whoexer you j cneoura g e us i n every conflict. 

Spirit tells you to stop, and God s j ^y e v j s ;ted among the friends until the’ 


We visited among the friends until the’ 
Gth of December, when we took the cars 
for home, and arriving at Hagerstown, we re- 
mained there till next morning. During 
the night a fire broke out and consumed a 
church, Court-house, and some other build- 


of James carefully and prayerfully, and dear ings, supposed to be the work of an incen- 

brethren, let us particularly observe the diary. One man lost his life. 

eleventh and twelfth versos. * 1 Wc got homo the 7th and found all well 


diary. One man lost his life. 

We got home the 7th and found all well 
... tliauks be to God, for his kind care aud pro- 

During our journey, while visiting the beetion over us ; and for the love shown to 
brethren and sisters, we attended thirty- ug ( j tll .£, 1 g. our visit. May we all be influ- 
three meetings. May God bless our labors t , nce< j j,y t } lc divine Spirit, which proceed - 
aud those among whom we visited, as well f rom the Father through the^on, to his 
as those at home, for the love they man- \ faithful children. Amen, 
ifested towards us while absent. May God j Sfrasl />„. j AC0B K . Andrews. 
help us all to watch and pray that we enter j 

uot into temptation. Let us all be faithful, " # 

so that if we meet no more on earth, wc 1 Visit tO Illinois. 

may all meet in heaven. Y\ e arrived safely 

at home the 30th of November and found At the request of some of the brethren 
all well, God be praised. IV e ask the bless- uud sisters 1 will, by the help of God, try 
ing of God on us all, that he will keep us to give an account of my journey to Illinois, 
under his protecting care, and when lie is On the 24th of November, 1871, I loft 
done with our services here, may he save us | 10U1C i n company with Bro. Samuel Bixler 
through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 0 f Elkhart County, to visit some of the 

G. D. IlEATWtfilE. churches in Illinois We took the cars at 
Rushville , Rockingham Co ., Va. )1 | South Bend, on the morning of the 25th, 


42 


HEIEIR/.A.XjID OIF 1 TRFTH. 




and arrived at Chicago about 7 o’clock the 
same morning While here we traveled 
some five miles on the street cars and omni- 
bus niostly through the burnt part of the 
city. It reminded us of the words of Jesus 
which he spake to his disciples about Jeru- 
salem, or about the temple “Secst thou 
these great buildings? there shall not be 
left one stone upon another.” So it seemed 
to us about many of the once beautiful and 
costly mansions of Chicago. We were also 
forcibly reminded of the uncertainy of earth- 
ly treasures, and that all that is seen is but 
transitory and will soon pa^s away. About 
10 o’clock we took the train and went to 
Joliet. Having to remain hero about 7 
hours, we visited the state prison. There 
are 1320 prisoners confined here. Our 
minds were again directed to the word of 
God whereitsuys, “The wayof the transgress- 
or is hard.” O dea'r reader, let us ever 
bear in mind the words, “Thou God seest 
me,” that w r e may never bring shame and 
sorrow upon ourselves and friends. 

Leaving on the train, we arrived at Gard- 
ner at nine o’clock. The evening being 
dark and rainy we remained with Joseph 
Kulp who lives near the station. The next 
morning he took us to meeting where a 
small, but attentive congregation had met 
to hear the word of God. On the evening 
of the 28th, we agaia had preaching in a 
neighboring school-house where quite a 
number of attentive hearers had assembled. 
The 29th, we spent with Bro. Andrew 
Bachman. He accompanied us to Liv- 
ingston county. On the evening of De- 
cember 1st, we had meeting at Bro. Henry 
Shelley’s in Kankakee county, and I felt that 
God’s promises were verified, in which he 
says, “Where two or three are gathered 
together in my name, there will 1 be in 
the midst of them.” The next day Bro. II. 
Shelly accompanied us to where the breth- 
ren Hamilton and Lehman reside to attend 
a meeting on Sunday. Here we had a 
pleasant meeting, also another the same 
evening. On the 5th we went to Woodford 
county, by private conveyance, a distance 
of about forty miles, and the day being very 
cold, we were glad when we reached the. 
residence of Bro. Samuel Grove. While in 
this county, we attended three meetings 
and enjoyed ourselves very well. Perhaps 
it would not be out of place here to mention 
a very sad occurrence that took place about 
three miles from brother Bally’s. On the 
evening of the 5th ol December (Sabbath), 
a man about 20 years of age while engaged 
in rocking an infant, was shot through the 
window by some one outside, the ball pass- 
ing through him into the wall, he sprang 
from his chair into the bed room where his 
wife was and told her he must die, and com- 
mended his soul into the hands of God, and 
immediately expired. O, how horrible to 
think that man can become so degraded and 
demoralized as to take the life of his fel- 
low-man ! We were iuformed that lie was 
a member of the Amish church. 

On the 9th of December, the brethren, 


Samuel Bixler and Addison Shelly returned 
with Bro. Bachman’s team. Bro. Bachman 
and I took the train at Minonk for Morrison, 
in Whiteside county, and stopped with Bro. 
Gsell. The next day, Sabbath, we attended 
meeting near by, and on Tuesday we had 
another meeting at the same place. The 
brethren here intend to build a Meeting- 
house. There are about thirty members 
now, and one more expressed a desire to 
be united with the children of God while 
we were there, which was truly encouraging. 
On Wednesday we went in the vicinity of 
Sterling to attend a meeting on Thursday. 
vWe visited the brethren as much as time 
would permit us here and also at Morrison, 
and it was our happy privilege to form an 
acquaintance with many beloved brethren 
and sisters while on our journey. From 
here we returned to Grundy county, where 
my father-in-law resides. [ left here and 
reached home the 22nd of December, and 
found my family well. I desire t.o return many 
thanks to the brethren and sisters for the 
love they manifested to us while among 
them. May the Lord reward them. 

I feel thankful to God for his protecting 
care over my family and me while I was 
absent. May the Lord bless our labor that 
it may bring forth fruit to the honor of his 
name. 

Smith Bind , InJ. Samuel Yoder. 


A Visit to the North 


On the 8th of Jan., I took the cars at 
Bronson Mich., for Sturgis, where I remain- 
ed over night. On the afternoon of the 
next day 1 arrived at Grand Rapids, and 
was there met by Bro. Henry Wismcr, who 
who took me to his home, twelve miles dis- 
tant. 

The 10th we held meeting in the Cal- 
edonia Meeting house, in Kent Co., on the 
llth in the house of the aged Sister Wen- 
ger, in the evening in a school house near 
Hammond station. On the 12th Bro. Abra- 
ham Detwcilor, and Hannah Handing, 
daughter of deacon Win. Handing, of Cana- 
da, accompanied me to Big ltapids, where 
we arrived in the afternoon. Bro. John 
Gingerich met us here, and conveyed us to 
his home, twenty miles. 

The weather was pleasant and the sleigh- 
ing excellent. The 13th, we visited the breth- 
ren, and held a meeting in the evening at 
the house of Bro. Jacob Gingerich. On 
Suuday the l lth, we had meeting at the 
house of Bro. John Gingerich, and in the 
evening at the house of Bro. Peter Ginger- 

i O o 

ich. 

! The 15th, we returned to Lowell, Iona 
I Co., where we arrived at 11 P. 31. and 
were met by Bro Peter Keira, who took us 
to his home. The lGth, we spent in visit- 
ing the brethren, and had meeting in their 
new meeting-house the same evening. The 
1 7th we had meeting at the same place. In 
the evening I was conveyed 1 G miles to Bro. 


next day, and took the train for home, where 
I arrived in the afternoon, and God be 
praised, found my family well. 

I am thankful to the brethren, for the 
kindness they manifested toward me while 
with them. 

Branch Co., Mich. C. D. Beery. 


A Visit to Tazewell Co. 111., Indiana 
and Michigan. 


John Leathorman’s, I remained here until 


On the llth of January I left my family, 
and in company with Bro. C. Imhoff, took 
the train at Danvers for Tremont, where we 
were met by Bro. C.Burkey, who took us to 
his home, about two miles away. Bro. Jacob 
Unzicker came here, and in the evening he 
couveycd us to his home. A meeting was 
appointed at the house of Bro. J. Lnzieker, 
on the 12th, where a great number was as- 
sembled, and the glad tidings of the gospel 
waf taken into consideration. 

On the 13th Bro. Unzicker conveyed us 
to Washington, in the same county, where 
wc expected to attend meeting on the l4tF 
but I was taken to Livingston Co., 30 m\m 
distant, by my brother, P. Stuckey, to de- 
liver a funeral discourso on the afternoon of 
that day. We arrived safely at Bro. C. 
Danners, whose mother-in-law, Catherine 
Rogge, was dead. Her age was 75 years, 

0 months and G days. A large number had 
assembled, and an earnest discourse was 
presented on tbe mortality of man. Tbe 
bod y was interred in Bachman’s grave-yard, 
in the presence of many friends and relatives. 

On the 15th, Bro. Engel brought me to 
my brother-in law, N. llilde, a distance oi 
15 miles ; the same evening llilde brought 
me to Chenoa, from thence I took the train 
for Chicago, and Elkhart. I arrived at Bro. 
Funk’s at 2 A. M. After a few hours rest, 
Bro. Funk had his team in readiness for 
Bro. Beutler and mo to attend tho funeral 
of Sister Stauffer, at Shaum’s Meeting- 
house, 7 miles from Elkhart. Funeral ad- 
dresses were delivered to a large assembly, 
by D. Brenneman, in cnglish, and the 
writer in german. 1 returned with Brenne- 
man, and in the evening we had meeting 
at the same place, with a goodly number of 
hearers. I remained over night with Pro. 
II. Shaum, next morning I returned to Elk- 
hart, remained till afternoon with Bro. Funk, 
and then took the train for Goshen, where 

1 was met by Bro. A. F. Yoder, and taken 
to his home. I remained with him over 
night, and on the l8th he took me to Ben 
jamin Schrock’s ; on tho 15th there was 
meeting in Clinton, which was well attended ; 
in the evening we had meeting at D. P 
Schrock’s school house. The 20th I spent 
in visiting, and in the evening we had meet- 
ing at the Mcnnonite Meeting-house near 
to E. Ilochstetler’s. The 21st there was meet 
ing in the little Elkhart Meeting-house, a 
large number were here assembled. 

The 22nd Bro. Eli Miller conveyed me 
to Michigan in a sled, as there was much 
snow. In tho evening we had meeting in 




HERALD OP TRUTH. 


Joseph Yoder’s school house. The 23rd On the 25th we had meeting at the same 
Bro. Miller took me to Pretty Prairie, dis- place, and in the evening I again set out 
tant about 2S miles, and we remained over on my journey to Elkhart Co., Ind. On 
night with Pre. Jonas Yoder. The 24th Sunday the 28th we held meeting in the 
we had meeting in the meeting-house, and Clinton Meeting house, on Tuesday in the 
in the evening in a school house, and re- Mennonite Meeting-house in Adams Co. 


mained with Christian Werri over night. 
The 25th we went to Haw Patch, a distance 
of 25 miles. Sleighing was excellent. We 
stopped with Chr. Holly until next day, tbe 
26th, when wo had meeting in the Haw 


I then continued my journey to Fulton Cm, 
Ohio, where I had the opportunity to ad- 


raanagers of the boat concluded that, on ac- 
count of the ice, it would be imprudent to 
venture any further, and consequently we 
were under the necessity of looking to some 
other mode of conveyance to bring us to 
Masontown, near which place the church we 
intended to visit, is situated. It was now 
about 8 o’clock in the morning, and having 


Patch Meeting-house, where a goodly nutn- Archbold, and arrived safely home the 8th, 
ber had assembled. Bro. Schmucker and I of Febr., and found my family well, God be 
returned with Bro. Holly, where we remain- praised for all good. 

ed in conversation a few hours. Bro Holly During this time I visited many brothers 


dress a very large congregation of attentive a good nights rest, we concluded to make 
hearers. ° at least a portion of the way on foot, and 

On Tuesday I again took the train at after walking eight or nine miles we came 
Archbold, and arrived safely home the 8th, trf the house of Bro. Jacob Johnson, where 
of Febr., and found my family well, God be we made a short stay, and in the afternoon 
praised for all o'ood. he kindly provided us with horses, and ac- 


took me to Ligonier, and at 4 P M. I took the 
train lor Chicago, where I arrived at 9. At 
10 I left for Peoria, and at 7 A. M. I was 
again on my way for Washington, from 
thence I went to Sister Magdalena Burkey, 
and in the evening to my brother, Peter E. 
Stuckey. The 28th we had meeting here. 
I remained with Bro. Peter Strubher until 
the next day, when Bro. Chr. Strubher 
brought me home. I found my family all 
well, thanks and praise to God for liis grace 
and mercy which he bestows on all men. I 
am very thankful to the beloved brethren 
and sisters among whom I visited, for the 
true friendship manifested toward me. For 
this the Lord will reward them, through 
Jesus Christ. Amen. 

Danvers, 111. JosEni Stuckey. 


During this time I visited many brothers 1 companied us to his Bro. Kicholas Johnson, 
and sisters. To enumerate all the particu- who lives a short distance irom the Mason- 
lars of the journey would be too tedious, town Church, where we attended meeting 
The cordiality and friendship with which that evening. Here we met the aged Bishop 
I was received bv all, without exception (al- Xicbolas Johnson, who is now about eighty- 


though the majority of them had never seen five years old and has been in the service of 
me before), and the willingness to convey me the church nearly sixty years. The aged 


from place to place, was unexpected. 

-w- * 1 II 1 . 1 /» 


brother still enjoys good health and is a 


I am too humble and unworthy for the zealous laborer in the cause of Christ. He 

^ I . i i • i i 


love and care which the brethren and sis- 
ters manifested towards me; and I return 
untd them my sincere thanks. 

The impression this journey made upon 


seems to be still quite strong both in body 
and mind, and his earnest admonitions are 
: still full of encouragement and hope. We 
were made to rejoice while we listened to the 


me is that the people generally are willing words of the aged father, who, full of years 
and inclined to hear the word of God and ripe in experience, yet spoke to us with 


preached, especially when visited by strange I so much earnestness and love. Having 
ministers. ! grown old in the service of God, he too, with 

Therefore, dear fellow-laborers, let us j David, may say, ‘‘I have been young, and 
nrnvir1r> thorn willincrlv. and take heed now am old; yet have I not seen the right- 


A Tmipncv tn Tllinnk’ Tnd anil Ohio wllicl1 tllc UoJ y v -' nost ,iain m:,uo > (,u ” v Y r ‘ 
A Journej to IIUIIOI. , ind., <lll(I Ul . setirs ^ t0 f eC( j t he church of God, which he 

On the 18th, of January I left home and (Christ ) hath purchased with his own blood,” 
took the train at Pulaski, for Illinois. On Acts 20 : 28. Let us follow the example of 
Sunday the 21st we had meeting at Pleas- tEe apostles and their true followers who, 


Therefore, dear fellow-laborers, let us 
provide them willingly, and take heed 
unto ourselves, “and to all the flock, over 
which the Holy Ghost hath made you over- 
seers, to feed the church of God, which he 
(Christ ) hath purchased with his own blood,” 


eous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” 
Ilis fellow minister is Bro. David John- 
son, with whom our intercourse was none 
the loss pleasant, and we indeed felt that 


xs 3 ur Tei ** r st r 0 "* t Vifr , . and 

. , . t- i ciders hero that “nnr tves had fa en to us 


ant Grove, McLean Co., and in the even- 
ing at the sumo place. ’These meetings 
were large, and full of devotion. The har- 
mony of the singing was very striking. How 
desirable, yea, bow necessary it is, that an 
effort be made, in all the churches to im- 
prove the singing, thus “Speaking to your- 
selves in psalms and hymns and spiritual 
songs, singing and making melody in your 
heart to the Lord,” Eph. 5:19; “ Teaching 


notwithstanding the hardships and incon- 
veniences connected at that. time, unwearied, 
visited the churches. IIow much more 


sisters here, that “our lives had fallen to us 
in pleasant places.” We spent about two 
weeks in visiting and holding meetings both 
at their meeting-houses and also at several 


Zm w7a.*bta.«rUa of freedom, ; 1^ ** 


and the conveniences with which we can trav- 
el in our times. How many dead could be 
awakened, sluggards revived, and weak ones 
strengthened. How many discords and di- 
visions might be avoided. A single soul is 
of more value than tbe whole world, and 


and admonishing one another in psalms and shall it go astray because of tbc reposing of 


hymns and spiritual songs, singing with 
grace in your hearts unto the Lord,” Col. 


grace 
3: 16 
On 


the shepherds? 
Pain ski, Dati 


Roneet. 


On the evening of tho 22nd, wc had 
meeting in a school house near Danvers, 
where a large number were assembled, not- 
withstanding the inclemency of the weath- 
er. Between these meetings 'I visited ac- 
quaintances and strangers. On the 23rd 
Pre. Imhoff, took Pre. John Stably and me 
to Washington, Tazewell County. Ye re- 
mained over night with the aged F>ro. Eh- 
risman. On the 24th we had meeting in 
the Mennonite Meeting-lionse near Wash- 
ington, where we met Pre. J Unzicker, of 
Pekin, and l’rc. Jos. Burkey, of Bureau 
Co. After the meeting Ero. Jos. Burkey 
returned to his home. The other preach- 
ers all went with Bro. Peter Strubher, where 
we spent the evening in examining the 
Scripture, which was very edifying. 


Our Visit to Fayette and 
Counties, Pa. 


Cambria 


Upon the urgent request of the brethren 
in the above named places, that we should 
visit them, Bro. Daniel Brenneman and 1 
left home on Monday evening, the 22ml of 
January, and arrived at Pittsburg at lour 
o’clock the next day, where we immedi- 
ately took the boat for McLane s Landing, 
on the Monongahcla, about 80 miles above 
Pittsburg. But tbc weather being very 
cold, and the boat heavily loaded, we made 
slow progress. The river also beginning to 
freeze over, impeded our progress a great 
deal, so that when we got to Brownsville, 
some 15 miles from our destination, the 


Lord was with us aud also with his people, 
for wc found that many indeed were ready 
to inquire, “ What shall 1 do to be saved?” 
During tbe time of our sojourn there, thirty- 
six precious souls, many of them young peo- 
ple, made application to be received into 
! the church, and accordingly on Sunday, 
the 4th of February, thirty-two were bap- 
tized, and with two others who had been 
baptized prjviously, were received into tho 
church. Two others (Bro. and Sister Har- 
bor), had been received on the Sabbath 
previous, at their own house, because the 
brother was not able to leave his home on 
account of having hurt his foot so as to dis- 
able him from walking. 

In this place a sabbath school was main- 
tained for several years (though for some 
time past it has been closed), and it probably 
was one of the first places where the Sab- 
bath School was instituted among our peo- 
ple, and we have reason to believe that the 
seed sown by this means has not been un- 
fruitful. Wc believe that the church is 
now reaping, at least to some extent, what 
was then sown, and we hope that it may bo 
the means of doing much good still. We 
i feel assured that the Sabbath school, under 


44 


HIIEiR/A.ll.ID OF TE/TJTH. 




the blessing of God, is a great help to the 
church everywhere, if conducted on gospel 
principles. 

On Monday morning we again met with 
the church, where two ministers and a dea- 
con were &dained. The names of the min- 
isters are John Durr and Christian Dcffen- 
bach, and the name of the deacon is Nich- 
olas D. Johnson. May the Lord bless and 
direct them in all their ways, and give them 
grace to be faithful in the great work to 
which they have been called, so that they 
may be instrumental in doing much good, 
and that by their efforts the church may be 


edified, and the name of God glorified. I 


would say to them all, be faithful in all 
things, earnest, in prayer and zealous in good 
works. 

But time would fail me to write all that I 
would desire to say. We visited many warm- 
hearted and zealous brethren and sisters ; 
some few we found who were laboring un- 
der afflictions,among whom we might mention 
sister Johnson, wife of Joseph B. Johnson, 
who has been afflicted for some time, yet 
under all her trials she feels resigned to the 
will of her heavenly Father, and we feel as- 
sured that in him she will find comfort and 
consolation. One of Bro. S. A. Hayden’s 
daughters was also laboring under a severe 
affliction during the time of our visit, so that 
she was not able to attend public wor- 
ship more than a few times, yet the Lord 
was with her, and she gave evidence that 
God had been merciful to her, and that she 
had found peace in believing on the Lord 
Jesus Christ, and also signified her willing- 
ness to unite with the people of God and be 
received into the church by baptism. May 
God give her grace to be faithful, and may 
many others indeed follow her example. 
There were some still, who I fear are wait- 
ing for a more convenient season ; I trust 
they will be enabled to make their calling 
and election sure, before it is too late. To all 
those who have already cast in their lot with 
the people of God, I would say, Be faithful, 
watch and pray, and trust in the Lord, and 
he will preserve you. 

On Thursday the 8th of February, we left 
this neighborhood and went to Johnstown, 
Cambria county, where we were received 
at the depot by Bro. Samuel Blough, and 
were kindly entertained by our friend M. 
W. Keim, with whom we also spent the 
night. The same evening we had a well 
attended and attentive meeting about a mile 
from town, where we also met a number of 
our brethren. The next morning we pro- 
ceeded to Pittsburg, where we spent several 
hours with Sister Ilug, who with her hus- 
band, lives in Alleghany City. She is the 
daughter of Bro. U. liege, editor of the 
Gcmeinde Blatt, published in Reihcn, near 
Sinsheim, in Baden, with which some of our 
readers are acquainted. In the afternoon 
we took the train and arrived safely at our 
homes on Saturday the iOth, and found our 
families, thanks be to God, all well. 

We feel thankful also to the beloved 
brethren and friends for their kindness and 


the love they manifested towards us while 
among them. May God reward them all, 
and may we be able at last to meet in the 
better land above. J. F. Funk. 


From Illinois. 


privilege of going to meeting, as well as 
those who are well supplied with preachers. 

I see in the last number of the Herald, a 
very appropriate piece of poetry, on which 
I would like to make a few remarks, or 
rather ask the author a question; he said, 


We frequently see letters in the Herald, 
from brethren giving an account of their 
travels, and also Irom some who have 
changed their locations. We have been here 


“ A charge I have to keep, 

Oh ’tis a sacred trust ; 

The Savior says, ‘ Go feed my sheep,’ 
And see that none are lost.” 


over a year. Long enough to learn some- 
thing of the country. This is to some ex- 


tent, an out of the way place, surrounded by 
rail roads, and the Wabash river on the 
east; leaving a territory of about 40 by GO 
miles, without any public thoroughfare, 
making it very inconvenient; consequently, 
land sells low compared with other parts of 
the State. The greater part of this (Oblong), 
Prairie was settled within eight years, it is 
now nearly all under cultivation. Prairie 
land sells from 15 to 20 dollars per acre, 


with good timber convenient. Good unim- 


proved timber land sells at five dollars; and 
upwards. The markets on the Ohio and 
Mississippi R. R. are as good as on the M. 
S. and N. Indiana R. R. We are 15 miles 
from the 0. & M. It. It. (Sumner); there is 
now a road under construction (North and 
South), 7 miles west of us that will be fin- 
ished in the spring, from Danville to the 
Mississippi river. 

There is also one in contemplation called 
the St. Louis and Cincinnati It. It. that will 
pass through our town (Oblong). Land is 
advancing in price and less offered for sale 
than when we came here. The land is of a 
good quality, and easily cultivated. Good 
water is found from 15 to 40 feet deep. 
This is said to be a good fruit country, how- 
ever it failed last summer’ cm account of an 
unusual late frost. The seasons in general 
are more pleasant than in northern Indiana. 
Last winter we had some sledding and a 
few cold days. This winter we have had 
several days of sledding and a few cold days. 
Some ploughing was done the last of'Dccem- 
ber. Last summer was very pleasant, with 
but few hot days. • 

No heavy storms. It was very dry, more 
so than ever known before. Crops were 
generally very good. But little sickness 
since our arrival. 

There are no members of our church 
here but us, consequently we do not have 
the privilege to go to our own meeting, 
which makes it very lonesome. If it were 
not for that monthly visitor, the HERALD OF 
Truth it would be much more so. 

It is very encouraging to read the jrnany 
admonitions in it; I wish it could be print- 
ed twice a month ; perhaps those members 
who live convenient to meetings do not ap- 
preciate the value of it as we do, who are 
alone here, as sheep without a shepherd. 
Ought notour traveling ministers who visit 
the churches east, west, north and south, 
feel themselves under obligations also to vis- 
it those members who are deprived of the 


Now I would like to know whether the au- 
thor of these lines, does not think it would 
be fully as necessary to visit and feed those 
sheep who have no shepherd and no one to 
sec to them, or guard them against the rav- 
ening wolves, and see that none are lost, as 
to visit and feed those who have their daily 
attendance? I think it is right and they 
ought to feel it their duty to visit the dif- 
ferent churches, but ought also to visit those 
who are away from the large flock. 


They frequently' travel several hundred 
miles before they get to any of the mem- 
bers, why cannot some of the preachers who 
speak in both languages, make a trip down 
here ? I know they cannot go any place 
where they will be more welcome than they 
would be here. We would be very much 
pleased to have some of the ministers or 
brethren to call with us. There would be 
time enough yet before spring work com- 
mences, so that there would perhaps not be 
much time lost for them to come this way 
when they are traveling east or west. We 
arc one hundred and twenty-five miles 
east of St. Louis, and fifteen miles north of 
the Ohio and Miss. R. 11. Those who think 
of changing locations would do well to 
come and see the country ; perhaps they 
might do as well here as to go further west. 

Adam Winger. 


Oblong City, Crave ford Co., 111. 


From Cliambersb , £, Franklin Co., Pa 


Brother Funk, I would feel very sorry if 
I should be deprived of the Herald of Truth; 
It affords me great pleasure, and does me 
more good to read it than any other reading 
I can get, except the sacred Scriptures. 
O, if we would do what it teaches us, wc 
could all be saved. 


Before I got the Herald, I was not a- 
ware that we had so many brethren and 
sisters scattered throughout the world ; I 
never expect to sec them in this world, but 
hope we may meet in heaven, never to 
part. 

I hope my earthly father has gone to 
heaven ; I also have two dear lambs there 
For one, I will try to meet them in those 
heavenly mansions where Jesus say r s “Eye 
hath not seen, nor car heard, neither have 
entered into the heart of man, the things 
which God hath prepared for them that 
love him”. 


A A 

love him”. 

I have traveled a great deal, and have 
seen many fine places in this country, but 


J 


1872 


OF TE/IJTH. 


none to compare with that glory of which 
God speaks. 

If it please the Lord to spare our lives 
yet a while, my next journey will be to the 
west. I have taken the Herald a long 
time and feel stronger now than at first. 
Remember us in your prayers. May God 
grant us all a blessing. Amen. 

John II. Weaver. 


From Missouri. 

January 22nd, 1 872. 

Bear Bro. John F. Funk, grace, mercy 
and peace be with you all, through Jesus 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

We are all in the enjoyment of good 
health, and feel well at home here. It is 
now about two years since our church was 
organized, and there are now quite a goodly 
number of us, so that our dwelling houses 
are too small to hold our meetings in, neither 
have we school houses or other places suit- 
able for meetings, so we have taken church 
counsel and agreed to build a house, but 
find that we are not able to do it ourselves, 
as we are just starting up in a new country 
and do not possess the means ; therefore we 
have thought it best to ask our breth- 
ren in other places for help. Perhaps 
they would be willing to cast in a mite. We 
therefore would ask all who are willing to 
help us to send in their contributions to the 
address of Samuel Yoder, Virgil City, Cedar 
Co., Missouri. We will receive all such 
favors with the most sincere thankfulness. 
Samuel Yoder. 

John Snyder, 

JosErn Kauffman, 
Jonathan Kriciibaum. 


Ijtlbrtn's £)cpartmntt. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

New Year. 

How great the anxiety in many' children 
for New Years day, expecting some presents, 
or some kind of pleasure to make them 
happy. 

1 have now lived forty five New Years, 
some happy and cheerful ; but many were 
mingled with sorrow and distress. Oh how 
many disappointments we meet in our cal- 
culations and expectations in this world. 
This will not be the case on the side of the 
Savior, for he has promised us a happy N ew 
Year, when we shall meet in heaven. Then 
we shall be clothed in fine, white robes ; and 
the children shall shine like the beautiful 
angels. 

This happy New Year gift, this great 
prize we can obtain by coming to Jesus. 
It will cost us no money. l)o good and 
love your Savior; but children may ask, 
How can I do good ? Paul says, “Honor 
thy father and thy mother; which is the 
first commandment with promise; tl ,1 it 


may be well with thee, and thou mayest 
live long on the earth,” Eph. 6 : 2, 3 ; this 
is one great duty, and when strictly observed, 
it will give us much happiness on earth, and 
everlasting rest in heaven. 

O how happy we feel after we have will- 
ingly obeyed the commands of our parents. 
We should also try to live temperate in all 
things ; be patient in sickness and sorrow, 
waiting on the promise of the Lord ; fortify 
ourselves against murmuring and discontent, 
and thus be unhappy and cause grief all 
around us. We should not charge God forlet- 
tingusget sick, when we are frequently viola- 
ting the laws of nature. 

Temperance has a great deal to do with 
our true happiness, and the glory and sal- 
vation of our souls, through our Lord and 
Savior Jesus Christ. 

Again if we wish to live happy ourselves, 
we must try to make all around us happy ; 
we must love our neighbors, and speak of 
their good qualities; do good wherever and 
whenever wc can. Jesus says, “Inasmuch 
as ye have done it unto one of the least of 
these my brethren, ye have done itunto me.” 

If we are always criticising, finding fault 
with our neighbors, we forget ourselves, 
live unhappy, and drive our neighbors from 
us, and thus bring on strife and uuhappi- 
uess. Pity those that do evil, because of 
spiritual blindness. If we love much we 
shall have much forgiven. All these things, 
through the grace of God, lead and point 
us to the happy New Year. 


East Lymn, Cass Co., Mo., 1 
January 12th, 1872. j 
• Dear Bro. Henry. We are readers of 
the Herald and like it very much. We 
have read a chapter in the Bible and also 
in the Testament every day since January 
first 1871. I am 13 years old, and my 
sister is 11. Our little brother is 6 years 
old and has also committed to memory the 
verses you gave us, so that he could repeat 
them all on New Years day. 

“In joy and glory we shall rise 
To be with Christ above the skies.” 

Naomi F. Kurtz. Mary A. Kurtz. 


FOOD FOR THE LAMBS. 

— 

Fear God, and keep Lis 
commandments : for this is 
the whole duty of man. For 
[j God shall bring every work 
j into judgment, with every 
i secret thing, whether it be 
[j good, or whether it be evil. 
U Eccl. 12: 13, 14. . 

i .rrara-i 


The following Table will show those who 
wish to read the Testament in the way pro- 
posed what chapter to read each day. 


Leetonia , Old 


A. N. 


Letters From the Children. 

Bedford, January, 28th 1872. 
Dear Bro. Henry, 1 am a reader of the 
Herald, and have also read the Testament 
through, and have commenced to read 
through it the second time. 1 am nine 
years old and hope all my little friends will 
read the texts that are given us. I wish 
you would come and visit us some time. 

“Return, o holy Dove return, 

Sweet messenger of rest, 

1 hate the sins that made thee mourn ; 

And drove thee from my breast.’’ 

Mary Annie Wallace. 

Belfbrd, Out. 

Dear Bro. Henry, I am a reader of the 
Herald, and I like it very well. I have 
read through the Testament three times. 1 1 
have also read the tasks which you have 
given us to read, and have now commenced 
to read through the German Bible. I hope 
all our little friends will join in reading 
through the Bible and Testament. 

“liver and over again, 

No matter which 1 turn, 

1 always find in the book of life 
Sonic lessons I love to learn. 

1 must take my turn at the mill, 

1 must grind out the golden grain, 

I must, work out my task with a resolute will 
Over and over again.” 

[ Henry F. Wismer. 



Days. 

Chapter. 

Days. 

Chapter. 

Mar. 13 

Romans 

8 

Mar. 

29 

1 Cor. 

8 

44 

14 

a 

9 

44 

30 

44 

» 

9 

44 

15 

a 

10 

44 

31 

44 

10 

u 

1 G 

a 

11 

April 

1 

44 

11 

u 

17 

it 

12 

44 

9 

Ml 

44 

12 

u 

18 

a 

13 

it 

3 

44 

13 

a 

19 

a 

14 

“ 

4 

44 

14 

it 

20 

it 

15 

a 

5 

44 

15 

it 

21 

a 

1G 

44 

6 

44 

16 

u 

»>•> 

1 Cor. 

1 | 

(4 

7 

2 Cor. 

1 

a 

23 

44 

2 1 

it 

8 

44 

9 

mJ 

a 

24 

44 

3 

it 

9 

44 

3 

a 

25 

44 

4 

44 

10 

44 

4 

a 

2G 

it 

5 

it 

11 

44 

5 

» i 

27 

u 

I! 

u 

12 

44 

6 

a 

28 

a 

7 

44 

13 

44 

i 


This table can bo written on a piece of pa - 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 

On the Death or Henry Wltmer. 

SEl.ECTED BY HIS TEACHER, S. YODER. 

“One sweet flower has drooped and faded, 
One sweet school-mate’s voico has fled ; 
One fair brow the grave has shaded, 

One dear school-mate now is dead. 

“But wo feel no thought of sadness, 

For our friend is happy now; 
lie has knelt in heartfelt gladness, 

Where the blessed angels bow. 

“He has gone to heaven before us, 
lint be turns and waves his hand, 
Pointing to the glories o’er us, 

In that happy, spirit land.” 



46 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


?$arrtt 


For the Herald of Truth. 

Advantages of Plain Attire at Church. 

It would lessen the burden of 
many who find it hard to maintain 
their place in society. 

It would lessen the force of the 
temptations which often lead men 
to depart from honor and honesty 
for display. 

If there was less strife in dress at 
church, people in moderate circum- 
stances would be more likely to at- 
tend, and more brotherly love would 
be manifested. 

Universal moderation in dress at 
church would improve the worship 
by the removal of many wandering 
thoughts. 

It would enable all classes of peo- 
ple to attend church with a better 
motive. 

It would lessen on the part of the 
rich, the temptation to vanity. 

It would lessen, on the part of 
the poor, the temptation to be envi- 
ous and malicious. 

It would save much valuable time 
on the Sabbath that could other- 
wise be better employed. 

It would relieve our minds from 
a serious pressure, and thus enable 
us to do more for Christ and the 
church. L ' 

“God resisteth the proud, but 
giveth grace to the humble.” 

Jacob Bowman. 

[We fully accord with the above 
views, and all who read it will en- 
deavor to conform themselves there- 
to. — Editor .] 

• a — 

Written on the death of my little 

Sister Harriet Naomi lloldeman, 

who died the 26th of Jan., LS72. 

We loved our little sister dear, 

But still we had to part ; 

And if the Lord we truly fear, 

We’ll all be oue iu heart. 

’Tis hard to say thy will be done, 

As we surround the silent tomb ; 

And for the last time look upon, . 

A cold and lifeless form. 

Two brothers and six sisters dear 
Have welcomed her above ; 

There too, we hope to meet them all, 

In purest union — love. 

The fairest flowers wo fondly love, 

I low soon their beauty dies ; 

But purer they will bloom above, 

In the fields of Paradise. 

In that bright, happy land above, 

We’ll find the loved — the blest; 

And naught oar happiness can move, 
When life’s rough sea is crossed. 


There love so pure, so rich, so deep, 
Fills every heart with joy ; 

There we may of its virtues reap, 

And .Satan’s plots destroy. 

We’ll meet again when storms are o’er 


On the 11th of Dec., in Elkhart co., Iud., Da- 
vid E. Troyer , aged 87 yrs., and 7 mo. He was 
a brother in the Amish church. Sermon by 
John S. Miller. 

On the 12th of Dec., in Mifflin, Juniata co., 
Pa., very suddenly, at the residence of her son- 
in-law Samuel Bonsall, Sister Lydia Landis , aged 


When the ills of life are past ; in-law Samuel Bonsall, Sister Lydia Landis , aged 

Where parting rends the heart no more, (J5 / rs ’ ] 11 “°;» and12 , £ uried th * lath 
W?ll P m« ® ,.H meet at last. I bJ ~ 

Wakarusa, Jiul. CATH. HOLDEMAN. 0 n the 4th of Jan., 1872, in Waterloo co., Ont., 

■' Christian Liuuman , aged 05 yrs., 3 mo., aud 1 day. 

i ^ # 1 On the 10th of Jan., in Hilltown, Pa., Sarah 

iH tfflffl Young, aged 7G yrs., 6 mo., tlnd 8 days. Her 

c trait* »* • ..imii 1 n o ware i 11 1 cvfofl in T.inn T.ftvinort.nn PTflVfi. 


On the 1st of Oct., 1871, in Fulton co., Ohio, 
by J. B. Dickson. John Stutzman to Barbara King, 
On the 11th of Oct., at the same place, by John 
Haldemnn, David Kropp of Davis co., Iowa, to 
Ijeah Eshlcman of Fu’.ton co., Ohio. 


Bowers. 

On the 4th of Jan., 1872, in Waterloo co., Ont., 
Christian Buuman, aged 05 yrs., 3 mo., aud 1 day. 

On the 19th of Jan., iu Hilltown, Pa., Sarah 
Young, aged 76 yrs., 6 mo., find 8 days. Her 
remains were interred in Line Lexington grave- 
yard, on which occasion, discourses yvere deliv- 
ered by S. Leatherman, John Walter and John 
Haldeman. 

On the 23rd of Jan., in Hilltown, Bucks co., 
Pa., the wife of Joseph Hendricks, aged 62 yrs., 
8 mo., and 16 days. Funeral discourse by Abr. 


’>On the 7th of Dec., at the same place, by Teter j Moyer and Isaac OberhoUzer. 

Nafziger, Peter Ktop/enstein to Catharine Ka/ziger, j On the 21st of Jan in Manor, Lancaster co„ 
both of the same place. P *-, £lvlna ' wlfe of Ja ?. ob Char J c °> a S ed 22 ? rs > 


Nafziger, Peter Ktop/enstein to Catharine Nafziger, 
both of the same place. 

On the Kith of Dec., at the same place, by the 
same, Jacob Rissel to Mary Roth , both of the 
same place. 

* On the 16th of January, 1872, in McLean co., 111., 
by John Stably, Irani Troyer to Susanna Stalter, 
both of the same place. 


1 mo., and 8 days. Her sufferings here were 
not long, but severe. Very appropriate funeral 
discourses were delivered by A. Witmer and C. 
Herr. 

On the 23rd of Jan., iu Somerset co.. Pa., Ja- 
cob , son of Bro. Samuel Spiegel, aged 9 yrs., 2 


On the 23rd of Jan./by Clark, Esq., John -0 days. Funeral discourse by Samuel 

S. Chambers to Phebe Good\io\h of Page co., Iowa. Plough. . 

7 _ — . . t In Hia nf Ion in \1 nruho 1 1 nr\ 1 n rl 


On the 4tb of Febr., by J. A. Beutler. Peter M. 
Blosser to Elizabeth Welly . both of Elkhart co. Ind. 


On the 28th of Jan., in Marshall co , Ind., 
Magdalena, wife of David Yoder , aged 35 yrs., 8 


On the loth of Febr., by Abner Yoder, Daniel mo., and 2 days. She leaves a bereaved husband 
D. Miller to Elizabeth Yoder, both of Johnson and six children to mourn their loss. 

tl, a DUt b a! Ion i r* I nnontfoi' r* a Po P r a 


co., Iowa. 

kOu the 18th of Febr., by Abner Yoder, John 
Yoder of Douglas co., 111., to Magdaltna Fisher 
of Indiana. 


Bui* 

On the 18th of Sep., 1871, in Holmes co., Ohio, 
of apoplexy, Isaac Miller, aged 80 yrs., 5 mo., and 
9 days, lie was a member of the Amish church, 
the father of 12 children, 70 grand, and 46 great- 
grand-children. Funeral services by Moses, and 
Levi Miller. 

On the 18th of Oct., in Holmes co., Ohio, Jo- 
nas Stutzman , aged 83 yrs., 8 mo., and 18 days. 
He was the father of 9 children, 67 grand, and 
-11 great graud-children. Funeral discourse by 
Moses Miller and Abraham Mast. 

On the 31st of OcL, in Holmes c<w Ohio, ELL 
Stutzman, aged 55 yrs., 2 mo., and 18 days. He 
leaves a wife and 7 children to mourn their loss ! 
Sermon by Shcni and Levi Miller. 

On the 27th of Dec., in Hilltown, Bucks co., I 
Pa., of dropsy, Hannah , wife of Jacob Musselman, '• 
in the 51st year of his age. Funeral sermon by 
Isaac Mover and Isaac Obcrholtzer. 


On the 28th of Jan., in Lancaster co., Pa., Bro. 
Elias II . , son of John H. and Fanny Brubaker, 
aged 21 yrs., 4 mo., and 11 days. Funeral dis- 
course by the brethren Risser, Hess, and Bom- 
berger, from Job 16: 22. 

On the 21st of Jan., in St. Joseph co., Ind., of 
typhoid fever, Susanna Kasei , aged 58 yrs., 4 
mo., and 6 days. Funeral discourse by E. Cook, 
J. Hildebrand and M. W. Shank. 

On the 29th of Jan., in Elkhart co., Ind., Cath- 
arine, wife of Daniel Mann . aged 19 yrs., 11 mo., 
and 21 days. Discourse by Samuel Yoder, Jacob 
Beutler and Henry Shaum. 

On the 25th of Jan., in Mifflin co.. Pa., Jacob 
Zug, aged 70 yrs., 8 mo., and 26 days. lie bore 
his affliction with patience. Sermon by John 
and Solomon Yoder. 

On the 31st of Jan., in Somerset co., Pa., of 
scarlet fever, Manda , daughter of Bro. Samuel 
Spiegel, aged 5 yrs., 2 mo., and 6 days. Funeral 
discourse by Samuel Blough, sr. 

“Weep not for me, my parents dear, 

Since I must go and leave you here ; 

With Jesus I shall happy be, 

O parents do not weep for me.” 

On the 31st of Jan., in ltockingham co., Va., 
of bronchial consumption, Sister Rebecca Hart- 
man, aged 31 yrs., 10 mo., and 23 days. She 


On t he 2! Uli of Dec , in York co., Ontario, of scar- was buried on the 1st of Febr., in Weaver’s bury- 
let fever, Wm Henry . aged 5 yrs., 5 mo., and 3 days, I ing-ground, in the presence of a large number 
and on the 1st of Febr , of the same lever, Louis f\ oLlriends and relatives. Funeral discourse by 


aged 2 yrs., 2 mo., and 8 days, children of Jacob 
and Catharine Steckley. Sermon by A. Ramer, 
and Elder F’atton. 

“Happy children gone to rest, 

Removed so soon by terror king. 

But in Jesus they are blessed, 

And in heaven glory sing. 

I.iule William Henry dear, 

• When about the world to leave 
Would have brother, -sister near, 

Reached his hand farewell to give. 

Thus affection’s nearest tie. 

Must be broke by death so strong. 

Little brother by and by, 

Sister, parents, all will come.” 

J. II. Steckley. 


j Chr. Brunk, D. Heatwole and J. Driver, from 
Matt, 24 : 44. 

On the 1st of Febr., in Wayne co., Ohio, Bro. 

; Jacob Kratz, aged 60 yrs., 5 mo., and 16 days, 
j He was buried on the 4th. Funeral discourse 
was delivered by Bro. Henry Beery. Text, 1 
\ Cor. 15 : 53 — 55. A short time before his death 
he said, “I feel that Jesus died for me,” and 
just before he expired he exclaimed, “F'ather, 
into thy hands I commend my spirit.” 

On the 3rd of Febr., in Warrington tp., Bucks 
co., Pa., rf small pox, Joseph Lapp, aged 66 yrs., 
5 mo., and 3 days. He was buried on the 6 th, 
at the Doylestown Mennonite burying-ground, 
where services were held by J. 51. Haldeman, 
S. Gross and Isaac ltickert. 

On the 4lh of F’ebr., in Manor tp., Lancaster 


1872 


ZHZIEIR^AILID OIF 1 TRUTH. 




co., Pa., of typhoid fever, Lizzie K, wife of John 
Witmer, aged 24 yrs., 3 mo., and 23 days. It is 
with the most solemn feelings that we record 
this event. Only a little over five weeks ago 
ghe was united in the bonds of matrimony, but 
in a short time she was a lifeless corpse, shrouded 
for the grave. Her sickness lasted 15 days. At 
the end of five days she became so weak that she 
thought her soul would depart. She was fully 
conscious up to this time. She then uttered in 
broken sentences the following words, “Now I 
am going — meet me in heaven — good-bye — now 
come - ” After this she again revived and lived 
ten days longer, during which time she experi- 
enced much suffering, great trials of faith, and 
gore temptations ; but her consolation and hope 
was in the grace of God through his beloved Son 
Jesus Christ, on whose name she called, who 
shed his blood on Calvary and there tasted all 
the bitterness of death ; he suffered for our 
gins, that if we come to a knowledge of our trans- 
gressions, we might turn to him by repentance 
and obtain forgiveness and become heirs of sal- 
vation. Even he felt forsaken of God and prayed, 
“My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me.” 
0 ! will he not hear, who has triumphed over 
death and hell, and over “the prince of the 
the power of the air?” Will he turn away from 
ihe penitent soul, and leave it to the power of 
Satan? I believe not. By his grace through 
faith we hope she has overcome ; if so, she is 
now the Lamb’s bride, in the heavenly Jerusa- 
lem, where sickness and suffering, parting and 
death are no more known, far beyond the reach 
of the temptations of our enemy. Some days 
after she had spoken to the family, she made 
some remarks to her husband about that time. 
She said, “she had been going and had seen a 
light, but they did not leave her go.” She was 
visited at different times by the minister and 
was instructed by him. She also desired his 
prayers. Her funeral was largely attended. 
Funeral Sermons were delivered by Abraham 
Witmer and Amos Herr. A. M. K. 

On the 5th of Febr., in East Donegal, Lancas- 
ter co., Pa., John B. Kraybill , aged 20 yrs., 4 
mo., and 26 days. 

“Farewell my earthly friends below, 

Though all so kind and dear to me ; 

My Jesus calls, and I must go ; 

I’ll trust alone in God’s free grace.” 

E. N. Nissley. 

On the 5th of Febr., in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
lung fever, Martha Ann , wife of Jacob Bearers, 
aged 21 yrs., 2 mo., and 21 days. She leaves 
a husband aud 2 children to mourn their loss. 
Funeral discourse by Henry Shaum, James Cul- 
bertson and Jacob A. Beutler. 

On the 9th of Febr , in Adams co., Ind., Em- 
ma Jane McGaughlin, aged 6 mo., and 27 days. 

On the 11th of F’ebr., in Shelby co., Mo., Mag- 
dalena, wife of Benjamin Hers hey, aged 62 yrs., 
9mo., and 3 days. She was a faithful sister in the 
Mennonite church over 35 years. She leaves a 
husband and 7 children to mourn their loss. 

“O what are all my sufferings here, 

If Lord thou count me meet 

With that enraptured host’t appear. 

And worship at thy feet.” 

On the 13th of Febr., in Logan co., Barbara 
"ife of Noah Yoder, aged 37 yrs., 9 mo., and 15 
days. She leaves a husband and 7 children to 
mourn their loss. Sermon by C. K. Yoder. 

On the 19th of Febr., in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
the infirmities of age, Catharine , wife of Henry 
Lyman, aged 70 yrs., 4 mo., 4 days. Funeral 
discourse by J.M. Christophel and l>. Brennenan. 

On the 26th of Jan., iu Elkhart co., Iud., Har- 
riet Kaomi, daughter of Joseph and Ann Holde- 
111 an, aged 11 mo., and 16 days. Buried at 
Shaum’s burying-g\o ind. At the same time also 
was buried a child o F’elix and Lena Burns. Fu- 
neral discouse by J M; Christophel, J. Beutler, 
and Joel Shively. 


On the 1 Oth of Febr., in Elkhart co., Ind., 
Henry, son of David R. and Elizabeth Witmer, 
aged 7 yrs., 8 mo., and 25 days. Buried at Yel- 
low Creek burying-ground. Funeral discourse 
by J. M. Christophel, D. Brennemau and J. 
Nusbaum. 

On the 7th of Febr., in Philadelphia, Katie, 
daughter of Aaron and Susanna Frick , of con- 
gestion of the brain, aged 1 yr., 11 mo., and 1 
day. Buried Febr.. 10th, at Franconia Meet- 
ing-house, in Montgomery co.. Pa. Funeral 
discourse delivered by Henry Nice. 

On the 20th of Febr., in Mahoning co., Ohio, 
ofthe infirmities of age, Jacob Metzler. Discourse 
by J. Culp, J. Bixler and P. Basinger. 

On the 21st of Febr., in Columbiana co., Ohio, 
of Palsy, John , son of Abraham and Susanna 
Moyer. 


'otters 


Heecibetr. 


Daniel Musser, Jacob Riehl, Samuel Yoder, 
C D Beery, Christian Stuckey, John P Speicher, 
J S Neuschwander, Chr Ilcrr, J A Hartzler, G D 
Heatwole, D Burkholder, J R Buckwalter, Jos 
Stuckey, J D Troyer, John O. Smith, M. Weber, 
Henry F’ Wismer, A M K, Mary A. Wallace, J 
Gerig, Isaac Rich, Audincourt France, John Reiff, 
Wm H Huber, E L Rosenberger you are right in 
letting us know, Abm Detweiler, J S Coffman, 
J K Hartzler, Chr Schmitt, John Stably, P Kin- 
singer, John Book, J M Haldeman, D S, B W Bare, 
D A Troyer, Solomon Yoder, Geo Funk, John 
Krupp, John P King, Elias Riehl, E N Nissly, 
D B F’ishburn, A M K, I) M, Ph Ronlct, Monte- 
zuma Brothers, Jos Stucky, MagJalena Salzman, 
J B Metzler, Lydia Detwiler, J K Aldarfer, 
Wm Gray bill. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — Jacob Iv Andrews $2 ; John Amstuiz $1 50; 
John U Amstutz SI 75. 

B — Levi Bock $3 ; Montezuma Brothers S2 ; 
Frank Beidler lOcts ; Jacob Brenneman $4 50 ; 
J N Brubacher $‘3 20 ; Geo Brenner $1 05 : Seth 
Burkholder $1 50 : Henry Bally .$! ; Daniel 
Ball .$'2 ; C Bear $2 ; Jacob Bachman $2 60 ; 
Peter Brillbart $1 ; Samuel Blough $20 50; Henry 
Brubaker 50 cts ; Jonathan Beiler $2 ; Elizabeth 
Beidler $3 ; Geo Bcrkey $4 ; J FI Borntregcr $1; 
John Bruuk $1 ; Gabriel Baer $1 ; Witmer J 
Barge .$‘1 50 ; David K Berkey $4 50 ; Joseph B 
Belsley $1 50 ; .lost Bally $3 ; Joseph Burkey 
$5 ; Naomi Itrackbill $1 ; Jos Belsley J $2 ; George 
Boiler $1 50 ; Jos Burkey $2 50 ; Jacob Blosser 
|1 20 ; Martin Birky $1 ; EH Byler $1 ; Gotlieh 
Book 60cts ; Daniel Behm $9; Chr Berger $1 60; 
David Basinger $4 70 ; Andrew Berky $1 ; CD 
Buckwalter $1 50 : C P Brenneiuan .$1 ; Sarah 
Bingeman $3 70 ; F Beiler lOcts ; Daniel Burk- 
hard $1 75; Jos L Brandt S2 10; Joseph 11 Byler 
for Lizzie Byler all right $2 10; Emmanuel Beery 
15cts ; Jacob Brenneman $1 30 ; Samuel Blough 
$1 ; Jacob Buckwalter $1. 

C — John S Coffman $1 ; J S Correll $1 50 ; 
C (Taudon $1 15 ; Abm C Clemence $1 50. 

D — Elizabeth Dunn $1 ; Jonathan Detweiler 
$8 ; Jacob Driver $5 ; John D Diller $1 ; C F’ 
Detweiler $7 10 ; Jacob Detweiler 37cts. 

E — Samuel Esbenshade $15 50 ; Chr Eigstein 
$1 ; Henry Ellaberger $1 75 , Heury Esbenshade 
$1 ; Hetty Eahleman $1. 

F — Henry Funk 10 cts : John Freed $2 10 ; 
Henry F’oiist $1 75 ; Mary Frick $1 ; Manasseh 
V F mz $t! : Nathan F’retz $1 35 ;’ David Funk 
$1 ; 1» B F’ishburn $1 ; Paul F’reed $1 50. 

G — Daniel Gehman $2 45 ; G W Groff 65cts ; 
Mary Gross SI : Joseph Gerber .$1 ; Jacob Good 
$1 : Andrew Good $1 40 ; D II Good $1 ; Jacob 
Geil •$'! ; Henry Gcil $1 ; J N Gnscho 7 Oofs ; 
Christian Good lOcts ; J M Greider $5 50 ; C U 
Gerber $1 ; Michael Gardner $1 : Catherine 
Garber $1 50 ; Abm Good 60cts ; John B Gin- 


grich $1 50 ; Andrew Good $7 50 ; Jacob Geh- 
man $ 1 . 

H — Henry K Hurst $3 ; Samuel Hunsberger 
$1 ; Samuel Hoover $4 75 ; David Hartzler $1 50; 
Jacob Habecker $1 ; Samuel Hunsberger $4 ; 
Jacob G Hoover $5; David M Hostetler $2 ; 
B F Hoover $1 ; Abm Hershey 60 cts ; Peter 
j Ililty $1 ; Jacob B Houser $1 : Jonathan Hersh- 
berger $2 50 ; E Hartman 12cts ; Dr J M Her- 
| shey $110; Jacob Heidelbaugh $1 ; Valentine 
llartman $1 ; Chr Hostetler $1 ; Eliza Hartman 
I $1 ; Yost Hertzler $1 ; S M Hertzler $1 45 ; 
Jacob Hahn $1 ; Dr F 1 Herring $1 50. 

I — C Irahoff $3. 

K — Catharine Kauffman $5 50 ; Jacob Kindy 
$1 50 ; John K Kurtz $1 50 ; Chr Kemp $1 ; 
j Martin Kindig 45cts ; C R King $1 : N H King 
$i ; Tobias Kreider $2 55 ; Jacob C Kenagy 
! $10 ; N FI King $6 35 : John L Kreider 50 cts, 
I you did not sign your name in your first letter ; 
John Klopfenstein $4. 

L — John B Landis $1 50 ; Catherine Loucks 
I 25cfs ; David Landis $T ; Daniel Latshaw $3 75; 
D Lehman $1 50 ; John Laird 55cts ; Sam Leh- 
man $1 ; David N Landis $3 60 ; Mary Landis 
$1 : Anna Lantz $'l 50 ; Wm C Livengood 50cts; 
John C Lehman 50cts ; Moses Livingston $1 50 ; 
Joseph Lit wilier $1 10. r 

M — John Miller 50 cts : Abm Mast $1 50 ; 
Philip Moseman $3 ; Martin Miller $5 ; Moses 
B Miller $1 60 ; Eli K Mylin $1 ; MS Moyer 
<$;1 ; Abm Moyer $1 60 ; Michael Myers $1 ; 
Solomon Metzler $1 50 ; L J Miller $1 60 ; Dan- 
iel Miller $1 50 ; David Mast 55cts ; Jos S Martin 
$3 ; J J Miller 50cts ; Daniel Metzler $4; Eliza- 
beth Metzler 13 cts ; Samuel D Miller $1 60 ; 
John M Miller 65 cts ; Ephraim Musser $1 50 ; 
J J Marner $8 50 ; Solomon Myers $2 ; Anna A 
Mishler $T. 

N — John Neuselnvnnger .$4 ; Jacob Nold 50cts; 
Daniel Nafziger $8 50. 

O — Wm Overholt $1. 

I P — Lizzie Plank $3 ; S I’letcher $1 ; Henry 
Pletcher lOcts. 

R — Christian Raber $1 ; It B ltiegert $1 50 ; 
John A Ropp 50cts ; Heury Rittenhouse $2 10 ; 
j Jacob F Ililtenhouse $1 ; John Roth $1 60 ; 

1 Samuel Rosen $2 ; Simon Risser 25 cts ; John 
Reiff $ l 50. 

S — Isaac Schrock lOcts ; Andrew Salzman $1 
50 ; P Shautz $1 ; Emmanuel Suter $9 ; Henry 
Stemen $1 50: George 11 Schmidt $2 ; J H Stauff- 
er $1 ; Chr Stuckey 30 cts ; John Shenk ,$*1 50 ; 
A J Springer $1 50 ; Abm Shank $1 20 ; Mrs M 
E Smith tfil ; S 7. Sharp $1 ; Chr Stuckey $1 25; 
Jos Stauffer $5 25 ; Johu Steinmau $5 : Daniel 
’Sliantz $6 £0 ; Lewis Schlifer 85cls ; M W Shenk 
$2 ; Mark Seiler 50cts ; John P Steiner 50 cts ; 

1 Chr Schrock $2 10 ; Chr Stuckey $13 40 ; J II 
Stuckey $2 50 ; Chr Sprunger $2 ; Wm Schrock 
$1 ; Catherine M Stauffer $1 60 ; John Stauffer 
$1 50 : David Suter .$3, paid to Jan. 1873 ; Chr 
Stoll $2 50 ; Henry Shenk $6 ; II Smetzer $1 ; 
M J Stemen lOcts ; Chr Schlater $7 50 ; Joseph 
Saylor .$■'! 25; George Shenk $1 25 ; C Stoll 25cts; 
A StoutFer $3 15 ; Samuel Y Sliantz $14 ; Henry 
S Stauffer 25ets ; Elizabeth Siever $1 ; Daniel 
Shcrriek $1 ; David Spangler $1 ; Jacob G Stauff- 
er $1 15; Katie Sloneger .$1 ; John F Stauffer 
I $1 ; I Showalter $1 ; Samuel Shenk $1 25; Sam- 
uel S Staufi’er $4 10 ; Moses Schrock 50cts ; Isaac 
Spituail .$‘1 27. 

T — John S Thomas 75cts ; Peter K Thomas 
45 cts ; Jonas D Troyer .$3 80 ; Jacob Troyer 
$2 40 ; J D Troyer lOcts. 

W — C Warfel $1 : Jacob Witmer $2 ; 8 amuel 
Wenger .$1 50; S FI Warner $5 ; Magdalena Web- 
er $1 60 ; C C Winger .$1 ; Gideon Weber $2 30: 
Levi Wissler S'i : David L Whitnier .$1 ; Isaac G 
Wenger $3 ; David R Winner .$1 50. 

Y— J II Yoder $2 ; J M Yoder $1 63 ; Chr K 
Yoder 65 cts ; Michael Yoder $10 50 ; John B 
Yoder $1 60 ; J Yoder $1 ; T D Yoder lOcts. 

Z — Jacob Zavitz $1 ; John Zehr $1 25 ; Martin 
1 Zimmerman $2 35 ; Jacob Zimmerman 70 cts ; 


SZEZR^LID OF TRUTH. 


Piirrh 


Martin Ziegler $1 80 ; Fred Zcrlein $2 ; Elias 
Ziegler $4 50 ; David J Zook $1. 

For Books. — J J I’lank $18 ; S M Ilertzlcr 
$10 10 ; Peter Engle $12 40 ; Emmanuel Suter 
$14 50 ; J C llunsicker $37 42. 

The following letters do not give their writers’ 
Post Office address : Samuel Wenger jr $1. From 
SpriDg Garden, Pa., $1, no name. 


TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passenger trains on and after Jan. 14th, 1872, 
leave Elkhart as follows : 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) 11,20, a. m. 
Special New York Expr., (Mnin Line) 1,10, “ “ 
Atlantic Express, (Air Line) 9,55, p. m. 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 1,10 a. m. 

Grand Rapids, 4,30 p. m. 

GOING WEST. 

Special Chicago Express (Main Line,) 4,35 p. m. 
Night Express, (Main Line) 2,40 a. m. 

Pacific Express, (Air Line,) 4,00 a. m. 

Accommodation 4,45 p. M. 

Trains for Detroit for the Great Western Rail- 
way leave Elkhart as follows : 

Express, 1,10, **• m. 

Night-Express, 1,10, a. m. 

All trains run on Cleveland time which 
is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time. 
y§v- Sleeping cars on all night trains. 
gtgf Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. 

C. F. Hatch, Gen. Supt. 

S. D. Bancroft, Agent, Elkhart. 

Books for sale at this office. 


The following books are sent by mail, postage 
prepaid. 

The English Mennonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery, 
at the following price : 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid 60 

Per dozen, “ “ “ $6 00 

** “ sent by express at purchasers’ 

expense - - - 5 00 

Pocket edition, - - - - - 75 

The German Spelling Book, a work of ICO 
pages, adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those who wish to Btudy the German language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. ... 25 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers’ ex- 
pense .... - $2 50 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 
on application. 

We have yet a small number of the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for. 75 cents. 

Anoknkiimk Stun den in Zion. The little Book, 
“ Ange.nehme Stunden in Zion" written by Ulrich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 

Ter single copy, postage prepaid, - $0 10 

“ dozen, “ “ - - 1 00 

“ hundred, by express, at purchasers’ 

expense, - - - - - -7 50 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
langnag, worthy of bting road by all. 


German Catechism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our office, 
at. the following prices : ‘ - 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ 0 10 
Per dozen, “ “ “ \ 00 

“ hundred, by express, - - 7 50 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. Walker, D. D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Pi ice, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of Pride and Humility, Eng. 
and Ger. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 
Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen 75 cts. 
Freemasonry . An essay showing its inconsist- 
ency with Christianity. A pamphlet of 48 pages, 
8 vo. Price, 25cts. 

English Mennonite Hymn Book, $ .60 

Conversation on Saving Faith, 1 75 

(Confession of Faith,) English j 

“ “ German .60 

English-German Testaments -75 

German Bibles, small size 1.00 

English Bibles “ “ 1.00 

German Testaments, small size .20 

a <« large size, with clasps 1.50 

44 with notes 2.00 

English Testaments, small Bize .15 to .50 

11 »‘ large size .40 to .60 

Dymond on War .50 

Should Christians Fight? -10 

Peace Manual -50 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2.00 

.1 44 *4 44 German, 1.65 

American Tract Primer, Eng. or Oer. .40 

German and English Primer .45 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. .25 

Bible Text Book .45 

Bible Reader’s Help -40 

Ahn’s German Grammar 1.25 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklterung 1.60 

Oehlschlagers Eng & Ger Dictionary, - 1 70 

Adlers “ “ “ - 80 

Adlers large “ “ “ by express 7 00 

Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 1 76 

Websters Dictionaries, 75, 90, 1 20, 1 45 a 2 50 


.60 

.75 

1.00 

1.00 

.20 

*sps 1.50 
2.00 
.15 to .50 
.40 to .60 
.50 


Habermans German Prayer Book 
“ English “ 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 
14 14 “ German 

En lish Testaments with notes 
41 “ “ Psalms 

German “ 

Dictionary of the Bible, by express 
41 “ “ Illustrated 

Pilgrims Progress, English or German 
History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 
Huebners Bible History, English 
Flcctwoods Life of Christ 
Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 
Menno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 
Unparteiisches Gesangbuch, with clasps 
Gemeinschaftliche Licder-Sammlung 
(niennonitisches Liedcrbuch) 
Unparteiische Liedcr-Samnn mg 
(amisches Liedcrbuch) 

Spiegel dcr Taufe (Ger.) 


Ernsthafte Christ enpilicht 65 

Johann Arnd’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arnd’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradies Gaertlein, &c. 3.o0 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 25 

Bibles, * 1 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 

per volume by express 4.00 

Health, or how to live 1-25 

Brown’s Pocket Concordance 60 

Mind and Words of Jesus 60 

Morning and Night Watches 60 

The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or German, by express 3.75 

For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each yegr bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.65 
The threq^ years together in one volume, 
by express $3.50, by mail $4.00. 

MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 
Funk’s sons. 

Price per single copy, Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

“ “ “ “ prepaid 14.50 

THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush and Kieffer. 

Price per single copy, postage prepaid, $0.60 
44 44 doz. 6.00 

THE CHRISTIAN IIARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 35 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Music. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, $2.75. 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnson’s system for 
learning to read music is unsurpassedby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $12. 

Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, we will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices- 

IjrraUi of |rutl?. 

A Religious Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK &. Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $1,00 a year in 
cither language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Persons subscribing should be particular 
I state whether they wish the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies Bent free. 

» Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

> Hlkhart Incl. 


Mennnnite Book Store, Book and Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 











A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY JOURNAL. 

■ — ■ - ■ 2 5SSS5 MBCSBBSSB 

<4 now beautiful arc the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.” 


Vol. 9-No. 4. 


ELKHART, INDIANA, APRIL 1812. 


Whole No. 100. 


“Bear ye one another’s burdens, mid 
so fulfill the law of Christ.” 

E. E. LIBBY. 

Bear ye one another’s burdens, 

Travelers through this vale of woe: 

Cheer thy fainting, erring brother, 
Christian pilgrim, as you go. 

Has the wily tempter snared him 
As he wanders to and fro? 

Knowest tliou his wild heart struggles? 
Cheer him, pilgrim, as you go. 

Think how Jesus blest the erring, 

Tenderly the good seed sow ; 

W’ith the spirit of tho Master, 

Cheer him, pilgrim, as you go. 

Hast thou never, never wandered 
Since the Savior thou didst know " 

Jesus loves tho tempted brother, 

Cheer him, pilgrim, as you go. 

Kindly words, they cost but little, 
Burdened ones their value know ; 

Would’st thou hear a Savior’s welcome? 
Cheer the downcast as you go. 

■ — » ! m — 

Tor the Herald of Truth. 

The way of Life. 

“Jesus saitli unto him (Thomas), I am the 
way ,” jn. 14:6; David says, ‘‘Shew me 
thy ways, O Lord; teach me thy paths. 
Lead me in thy truth, and teach me; for 
thou art the God of my salvation ; on thee 
do I wait all the day,” Pa. 25 : 4. 5. 

“All the commandments which I 

mnnd thee this day shall ye observe to do, 
that ye may live, and multiply, and go in 
and possess the land which the Lord sware 
unto your fathers; and thou shalt remem- 
ber all the way which the Lord thy^God led 
thee these forty years in the wilderness, to 
humble thee, and to prove thee, to know 
what was in thine heart, whether thou 
wouldest keep his co.mmanduients or 110. 
Thou shalt also consider in thine heart, 
that, as a man chasteneth his son, so the 
Lord thy Goi chasteneth thee. Therefore 
thou shalt keep the commandments of the 
Lord thy God, to walk in his ways and to 
fear him,” Deut. 8 : 1, 2, 5, 6. 

Samuel said to the children of Israel, 
“I will teach you the good and the right 
way; only fear the Lord, and serve him in 
truth with all your heart,” 1 Sam. 12: 23, 
”4. “ Blessed is the man that walketh not 

>n the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth 


in the way of sinners.” “For the Lord 
knoweth the way of the righteous: but the 
way of the ungodly shall perish,” Ps. 1:1, 
6 . 

“ Good and upright is the Lord : there- 
fore will he teach sinners in the way. The 
meek will he guide in judgment : and the 
meek will he teach his way. What man is 
he that feareth the Lord? him shall he 
teach in the way that he shall choose,” Ps. 
25 : 8, 9, 12. 

“ Teach me thy way, O Lord, and lead 
me in a plain path, because of mine ene- 
mies,” Ps. 27 : 11. ” Teach me thy wa/, O 

Lord ; I will walk in thy truth : unite my 
heart to fear thy name,” Ps. 86: ll. 

“ Aud now, Israel, what doth the Lord 
thy God require of thee, but to fear the 
Lord, thy God, to walk in all his ways, aud 
to love him, and to serve the Lord thy God 
with all thy heart and with all thy soul, to 
keep the commandments of the Lord, and 
his statutes, which I command thee this day 
for thy good ? ” Deut. 10:12, 13. 

Jesus Christ is the w r ay ; he also is made 
of God unto us wisdom : now the wise man 
says, “Trust iu the Lord with all thine 
heart; and lean not unto (bine own under- 
standing. In all thy ways acknowledge 
him, and he shall direct thy paths,” 1‘rov. 
0:5,6 “Her ways are ways of pleasant- 
ness, and all her paths are peace.” 

By faith, Jesus is the way to heaven. By 
faith we are in Jesus and he in us, aud he 
leads us to heaven where he now is. By 
faith we walk in the way of the righteous, 
through evil report as well as through good 
report. 

By faith in Christ we are led in the way 
of truth by the Holy Spirit “ that neither 
death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, 
nor powers, u8r things present, nor things 
to come, uor height, nor depth, nor any oth- 
er creature, shall be able to separate us 
from the love ot God. for “If God be for 
us, who cau be agaiust us"? By faith 
Christ is become tho way of wisdom for all 
thatdove him ; wisdom in God, wisdom in 
his gospel, wisdom in the Holy Spirit, wis- 
dom in the pardon of our sins, in short he 
is the Way, he is all in all ; in him wo live, 
in him we walk ; without him there is no 
way whereby we can be saved, and live 
happy. Now as Christ is the way, in what 
shall we sock the salvation of our souls? 


Shall we seek it amongst men ? or in ordi 
nances? To all these I say, No ; but in 
Christ we shall find it. Christ said, 
“Come unto me,” “I am tho way.” 
Again, “ There is none other name under 
heaven given among men whereby we must 
bo saved,” but alone in the name of Jesus. 
“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou 
shalt he saved.” Thus wo see that faith 
in Jesus is the way and the only way that 
we can be saved. “ Therefore we conclude 
that a man is justified by faith without the 
deeds of the law,” ltom. 3 : 28 . Again if 
we would come to Jesus we must believe 
that ho has gone before, and now saith, 
Come unto me aud I will come unto you, 
and dwell within you and the Holy Spirit 
shall lead and guide you into all truth. 

Christ is the way and tho truth whereby 
we shall live ; he has gone before, and wo 
must follow. He has promised to be with 
us to lead and guide us. Unto him is giv- 
en all power. If he is with us who neod 
fear? he will protect us, who need doubt? 
Christ is our way, he is strait hut narrow. 
All that we need on this way is true faith, 
hope, love and obedience. Obedience is 
better than sacrifice. The Lord said to 
Saul, through Samuel, “ Hath the Lord as 
great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifi- 
ces, as obeying the voico of the Lord ? Be- 
hold to obey is bettor than sacrifice, and 
to hearken, than the fat of rains.” 

Again Jesus says, “ Come unto me all yo 
that labor and are heavy laden, and I will 
give you rest. Take my yoke upon you aud 
learn of me ; for l am meek and lowly in 
heart. ; and ye shall find rest unto your souls.” 
lu the foregoing scripture there is some- 
tlniiLr to be learned when he calls all to him 
that labor and are heavy laden, and learn of 
him. The Jews found fault with him be- 
cause he with his disciples did not keep 
their ordinances; because “he went through 
the cornfields on the Sabbath-day and his 
disciples began, as they went to pluck the 
ears of corn ;” because he went into the 
house of a certain Pharisee and had not 
first washed before dinner, and because he 
sat at ui'at with publicans and sinners. 

Now brethren and all who may read this, 
remember that the Lord said, “ Learn of 
ine” as though he would say the kingdom of 
God coineth uot by ordinances, but by me; 
1 am the way to salvation ; by me if any 
oue enter in. he shall find restor pasture, and 


IHIFF'.A.ILID OF TRUTH. 


anvil 


I will lead them the way they shall go. 
The mother of Jesus said to the servants at 
the marriage feast, ‘-Whatsoever he saith 
unto you, do it.” Christ tells us to eome to 
him, for he is the way ; also 1 am meek, 
“Blessed are the meek.” lie says that we 
are blessed if we are meek, if we are poor in 
spirit; if we mourn; if we hunger and 
thirst after righteousness ; if we are merci- 
ful ; if we are pure in heart; if we are 
peacemakers; if we are persecuted, aud re- 
viled of men and all manner of evil spoken 
agaiust us falsely fur Christ’s sake ; he says, 
“ Rejoice, and be cxcccdiug glad; for great 
is your reward in heaven; for so persecuted 
they the prophets which were before you.” 

Brethren, let us hold fast to Christ, the 
true way, the way wherein we shall walk 
while in this world. Let ns be obedient to 
him and say, “ Thy will be done.’’ lie came 
into this world to do his Father’s will, to 
redeem a fallen people, and he became the 
way for all men. lie commanded that in 
his name should he preached, repentance 
and forgiveness of sins to all that believe on 
his name, and walk in the way that he 
commands ; not in our ways nor in the or- 
dinances of men. For many will seek to 
enter in, and shall not he able, because they 
wish to choose their own way, and not 
Christ. () Lord, do thou be with us. 
Lead and direct us while we are ou our pil- 
grimage here below, and finally take us 
home in peace, for without thee we can do 
nothing that is pleasing in thy sight. May 
the Spirit of Cod rest upon us all. Amen. 

John M. Greider. 

Osborn , Ohio. 


For tlie llcrald of Truth 


A Call to the Young. 

My dear young friends, readers 
of the Herald of Truth, you who are 
wasting the day of grace in sin and 
folly, who are passing through this 
gloomy world unconcerned about 
your future welfare; stop and think 
a moment whither you are travel- 
ing with such very speedy steps. 
Perhaps a few more days, months, 
or years will end your earthly pil- 
grimage. Whenever God sees fit 
to call you out of this world you 
must yield to the call, prepared or 
unprepared. If unprepared where 
will you appear, solemn thought! 
Eternal punishment will be your cer- 
tain doom. While onthe other hand, 
when the true followers of Jesus, 
leave this world of sorrow, they will 
l»e received into the mansions of ev- 
erlasting repose, “And God shall 
wipe away all tears from their eyes.” 
Behold young readers, consider for 
a moment the great difference be- 
tween the two classes. In eternity 


1 the difference will be so great that it 
' cannot be imagined or described. 

Stop and meditate before it will 
be forever too late to have your sins 
pardoned. My heart yearns for 
you when I think of your danger- 
ous coiidition. It grieves me to 
think of the vast multitude of young 
people who are willfully staying 
away from the fold of Christ, and 
wandering in forbidden paths. Tru- 
ilyitistobe lamented that /so few 
are willing to follow in the footsteps 
j of their kind redeemer. Multitudes 
are delaying the most needful work 
for a more “ convenient Season.” 
But ah, young reader beware, lest 
Satan lead you so far away from 
Jesus that you will never return! 
Do not suppose that you will ever 
find a more suitable time to enter 
! the narrow path than to-day. You 
have no assurance that God will 
spare you to see another day; hence 
it is very dangerous to delay the 
one thing needful to some future 
time. To-day the door of mercy is 
yet standing open. To-day our 
prayers will yet be heard. To-day 
Jesus is yet standing with open 
arms caliing sinners unto him. 
Young sinner, he is calling you. 
Oh, “ harden not your hearts.” But 
come to Jesus while you are young. 
Youth is the very best time to begin 
to serve the Lord, before the heart 
becomes hardened in sin. “I love 
them that love me; and those that 
seek me early shall find me,” Prov. 

! 8 : 17 . 

It is natural for young people to 
seek pleasure; and the people of 
God are to be a separate people 
| from the world, hence the youthful 
minds imagine that if they become 
I followers of Christ, all their pleas- 
ures will have an end. This is a 
sad mistake. What are the pleas- 
1 ures of this world when compared 
! with the joy that shall be revealed 
Jin the Christian in heaven? “Eye 
hath not seen, nor ear heard, nei- 
ther have entered into the heart of 
man, the things which God hath 
prepared for them that love him.” 

It is true, “ we must through much 
tribulation enter into to the king- 
dom of God.” But let me assure 
you my dear young friends, that 
the Christian lias more real joy and 
happiness already in this world 
than the sinner. Amidst all the sor- 
rows, trials, temptations, and per- 
secutions to which the Christian is 
subject, there is joy ; “ For our light 
: alliietion, which is but for a mo- 


ment, worketh for us a far more ex 
ceeding and eternal weight of glory; 
while we look not at the things 
which {ire seen, but at the things 
which are not seen ; for the things 
which are seen are temporal; but 
the things which are not seen are 
eternal.” All those who have laid 
up for themselves treasures in heav- 
en can look forward with an eye of 
faith to the time when all their suf 
ferings will have an end. But 
alas! on the other hand, those who 
prefer the pleasures of sin, in pref 
erence to a home in heaven , can 
have no hope of any happiness be- 
yond this vale of tears, but in ter- 
ror they must await the time when 
they shall appear at the bar of God 
and hear the doleful sentence pro- 
nounced against them, “Depart 
from me ye cursed into everlasting 
tire, prepared for the devil and his 
angels.” 

Where is that individual who 
would not wish to be a Christian in 
the hour of death? It is my humble 
desire to gain a home at God’s 
right hand; Oh my worthy young 
friends how I long to meet you all 
there. Once more then, as a well- 
wisher of your souls, I warn you to 
flee from the wrath to come. Oh 
come and taste of the goodness of 
God. Make your refuge in Jesus, 
that dear “ friend that sticketli clos- 
er than a brother.” How often have 
you been warned of your danger, 
perhaps by a kind brother, or sis- 
ter, or minister, and I trust by your 
parents who are perhaps mourning 
over your sad condition. Those of 
us who are blessed with Christian 
parents, who have often admonish- 
ed us and pointed us to Jesus, let 
us not grieve them in their declin 
ing years by disregarding their 
kind admonitions, lest we bring 
their grey hairs with sorrow to the 
grave. Let us give heed to the ad- 
monitions of Paul, “Children, obey 
your parents in the Lord; for this 
is right. Honor tliy father and 
J mother; which is the lirst com 
mandment with promise; that it 
may be well with thee, and thou 
mayest live long on the earth." 
Oh, young sinner, give heed to the 
j voice of warning. Remember that 
“the wages of sin is death.” Lot 
ns “fear God and keep his com- 
mandments, for this is the whole 
duty of uiau.” 


M OSES Br F.N N EM a N 


FA id a, Uhi( 


51 



1872 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

Our Homes. 

— 

Our homes, how do we enjoy [ 
them? This is an important ques- j 
tion which every person can best i 
answer for himself. If we think 
back over the season that has just J 
passed, how many reflections we; 
could make during those long win- 
ter evenings, as we were sitting in 1 
our comfortable rooms, in a happy 
family circle. 

Happy indeed, if it has pleased 
die giver of all good to smile on ns 
and add to our welfare, health, the 
most desirable gift in this life, also 
the things that are necessary to 
maintain our natural bodies. Cares 
should not disturb this happiness; 
for “Sufficient unto the day is the > 
evil thereof,” and what will be to- 
morrow, God only knows. Our 
homes should be a place of content- 
edness. Well may we have pleas- 
antly passed those long winter even- 
ings by reading instructive books: 
the Bible in preference to all others. 
In it are revealed those sacred truths, 
those rules which we must follow if 
we desire to have peace in this world, 
as well as a dwelling place for our 
immortal souls in the heavenly man- 
sions hereafter. 

The family circle may be differ- 
ently composed. Probably a devo- 
ted husband with his faithful wife, 
and their children, or a widow and 
her orphan children, or brothers 
and sisters, or sisters only, .may 
compose a family. Nevertheless 
God’s promises are extended to all 
that love him and keep his com- 
mandments. However there is a 
little member in every family, but a 
powerful instrument to much good, 
or great harm. “Even so the 
tongue is a little member, and 
hoastetb great things. Behold, how 
great a matter a little fire kindleth! I 
and the tongue is a lire, a world of 
iniquity: so is the tongue among, 
our members, that it delileth the | 
whole body, and setteth on tire the 
whole course of nature; and is set 
on tire of hell,” James 11: 5, f>. As 
"’ell as the tongue delileth our body, 
pven so it delileth thebody of a fam- 
ily, and setteth oil tire the course of 
nature, and throweth the whole 
family in confusion, if it is set on 
tire of the evil spirit. The apostle 
•lames exhorts us very earnestly to 
be careful what we say. The fire 
of which bespeaks, is probably the 
s ;une as that evil spirit that cometli : 


from the prince of darkness, which, 
if it finds room in us creates an evil 
feeling almost towards all men; es- 
pecially towards those with whom 
we have the most to do. The 
tongue is a ready agent to commu- 
nicate those feelings; therefore 
where discord exists between the 
members of one family, it is very 
often the work of the evil one. 

“ For the wisdom that is from 
above is first pure, then peaceable, 
gentle, and easy to be entreated, 
full of mercy and good fruits, with- 
out partiality, and without hypoc- 
risjr.” If we could but once leave 
oft* talking of the sins of our fellow- 
travelers, behind their backs; while 
in their presence we appear to agree 
with them it would he well For my 
part, I have enough to do with my own 
faults; while on the other hand, if 
we feel it our duty to correct our fel- 
low-men we can do nothing bet- 
ter than to give a kind and gen- 
tle admonition to them. 

“Speak not evil one of the other, 
brethren.” The members of the 
church of Christ are admonished to 
love one another, for “ charity cov- 
ereth the multitude of sins,” there 
fore we are not inclined to speak 
evil of our brother or fellow-man, if 
we are endued with that pure and 
peaceable wisdom from above. We 
say fellow-men, because Christ com- 
manded us to “love our enemies.” 
The apostle, when he says, “Easy 
to be entreated, full of mercy and 
good fruits, without partiality,” 
would have us to speak evil of no 
person; for the right spirit or wis- 
dom is from above and worketh a 
pure, gentle and merciful heart, out 
of which evil speaking can not very 
well proceed. 

Where charity lacketli among 
the members of a family or church, 
many sins will remain uncovered 
before the Savior, that are caused 
by the evil before mentioned. We 
all know that we are very careful i 
what we say in regard to our near- 1 
est friends, for which reason such a j 
friendship is to be continued. This ! 
one thing strictly observed, would ; 
greatly add to the happiness of our j 
homes, and to the edification of our 
churches. If it was generally ob- J 
served by all men, many prevailing i 
evils might thereby he avoided;! 
and it would come ve»y true that j 
“Charily covereth the multitude of j 
sins.” 

We have homes and houses for 
the protection of our natural bod- 


ies; and every person has a heart, 
which is the seat of life and the 
home of an immortal soul, as long 
as the mortal body exists. This is 
the very home that is most disturb- 
ed by our passionate feelings. The 
heart is the place where passion 
and anger are nurtured and cher- 
ished. Many words of such a nat- 
ure, can heedlessly pass from our 
lips, and as we think, be forgotten,:. 
Should an occurrence present the 
opportunity to behold the dying 
hour, or the lifeless body of a per- 
son with whom we were well ac- 
quainted, and probably through va- 
rious transactions had formed more 
or less of an imvard hatred against 
that person, without heeding the 
peaceful and reconciling doctrines 
that are taught in the New Testament 
it would besad. In such acase, we 
are inclined to believe our guilty con- 
sciences would quickly bring home 
to the heart those forgotten words 
and actions, and produce bitter, se- 
cret sighs instead of tender emo- 
tions, as they are caused by sym- 
pathetic feelings on such an occa- 
sion. 

Thanks be to the giver of all good, 
who has provided one that will 
cleanse and purify our hearts of 
such burdens, if we are willing and 
desire that he should do so, and 
make them his dwelling place. 

A happy home where Jesus dwells. 
Where love so pure ubouuds ; 

The Holy Spirit, peace foretells, 

And angels ne’er surround. 

“Prove all tilings, hold fast that 
which is good.” The unprontable, 
sentences if you meet such, were not 
the production of an evil intention. 

A. M. Kauffman. 

Columbia , Pa. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

“Suffer the little Children to come 
ii n to Me.” 

Mark 10 : 11. 

By the grace of God 1 will try tv* 
write a few lines for the Herald, al- 
though I feel myself too weak to 
write as 1 would desire; but through 
love to parents, and to the many 
little children thnt we see brought 
up contrary to what our Savior 
says, “Suffer the little children to 
come unto me. and forbid them not; 
for of such is the kingdom of God." 

I will try. Now then are we (parents), 
suffering our children to come unto 
the Savior, or are we not? Let us con- 
sider this well. Are we bringing 





IHIIEIR^LID OF TE/UTH. 


them up in the nurture and admo- we are taking them directly away that when they come to die, they 
nition of the Lord? Do we faithful- from Jesus and suffer them to he may enter into that rest which Christ 
ly admonish them .and tell them led astray by the enemy of souls, has prepared for all them that love 
what they must do to he good chil- who is seeking to devour them. him. 

dren? Are we talking to them about Let us consider these things well. C. B. Breiunemax. 


For tlie Ilorald of Truth. 


dren? Are we talking to them about Let us consider these things well. C. B. Brenxemax. 

Jesus, telling them who Jesus is, But some will say it matters not Elida, Ohio. 
and what he suffered for us on ac- what we put on our bodies or what j 

count of our wickedness? how kind we wear or how much we dress in ! * 0 *" 

the Savior is, how meek and lowly in the fashion if only the heart is j For the Herald of Truth 

in heart, how humble, and how pa- right; I admit it does not, if the Watch and Prav 

tiently he has borne all his suffer- heart is right, but I would here ask, ‘ 

ings without murmuring or com- Is the heart light as long as we still j in this world of temptation and 
plaining, and what a glorious place have a desire to follow after the tria.1, how greatly do we stand in 
he has prepared for all those that world? Can the spirit of Christ be ne ed of the admonition of our Savior, 
love him and do whatsoever he has in our hearts, while they are tilled to “watch and pray.” lie knew our 
commanded them to do? Are we with pride? I reply, No. A\ ill weakness and with wha+ earnestness 
teaching our children the love of Je Christ accept us if we give linn only t p e w i c ked one would endeavor to 


Watch and Pray. 

In this world of temptation and 


meeK ana iowiy j iinuui l uievi usi answer, in o. uuz u rm wains our affainst it, and to“ put on the whole 
be, and follow Ins example n they whole hearts, or where lie is we armor of God, that ye may be able 

wish to go to that happy place cannot go. 1 he Spirit of Christ, s tand against the wiles of the 

which he has prepared for his lot- and the Spirit of the Devil, cannot If we would serve the Lord 

lowers. . dwell in one heart at the same time; j n this evil world we must depend 

I)6fir friends, fire we tcRclini^ oin we u-ie eiiliei 101 (/In 1st, 01 we die T»irvi fY)i* stren^tli cis well cis for 


Gear mentis, are we teacning our we are enner ior unnsi, or we are on f or strength, as well as for 
children these things, oi instead ol against him. A A hen the soul is instruction, and a merciful accept- 
teaching them thelove and meekness converted to God, and has become ancP Q ur enemies indeed are 
of Jesus, are we teaching them the as a little child, if we have under- ^jo-pty and we are without 


tio A -i i * v ! V "v t oppose our course, li we wouiu 

lead them astray from God, these steps of the meek and lowly Lamb, put on the whole armor of God and 
precious little souls, as we see a j Jesus; then we have no more desire [ lse it successfully, we must like- 

^ a 4 -wt 1 / 1 r» n4»m -* II/'I lur- n ft / 4 4 i I ! / . ,ir It I t 4 I > /t -»r i < t «-> J- 1 4'.-\ I < C I . _ * * . . . . 


precious little souls, as we see a i Jes^us; then we have no more desire * se it successfully, we mus 
great many led astray from Jesus? | to follow after the vain and foolish w j se p ra y -ilwavs with the spirit 
1 hope not Many parents dress fashions of this world; No. it will with ‘ earnestness, and watch 
them after the fashions of the world, be to the contrary. \Ve nowloathe thereunto with perseverance; 
and then tell them how beautilul the things we formerly loved; we 

they appear, and thus create in want to be a separated people from Lest while we watch aud fear no s 
their little hearts a spirit of pride, the world; we want to be like Jesus, We fall into neglect of prayer; 
instead of the meekness of Jesus, meek and humble; we will have Or while we pray, and watch not 
Whence corneth the spirit of pride the Spirit of Christ ruling and reign- Creeps like a subtle serpent in. 
but from the evil one? Pride is not ing in otir hearts, and consequently qq 10 Christian life may be 
of Jesus, but is of the Devil; and pride will have left us; we are now Dared with a warfare and v 


Lest while we watch aud fear no snare, 
We fall into neglect of prayer; 

Or while we pray, aud watch not sin, 
Creeps like a subtle serpeut in. 


The Christian life may be com- 
pared with a warfare, and various 


hence we are leading our children new creatures in Christ Jesus, old are Bie methods which Satan the 
directly fro m Jesus in stead of suffer- things have passed away, and be- enemy of our souls employs to per- 
ing them to come unto him. Oh, hold all things have become new. ns to enlist under his inn. 


how careful we ought to be in bring- Now dear brethren and sisters, if we 
ing up our children that we do not believe that it is wrong for us to 
bring them up in pride. Jesus was dress in the fashions of this world, 
meek and lowly in lit art, and if we is it not fully as wrong for us to put 
want our children to come unto him, these things on our children? Let 
we must teach them to follow his us bear in mind that pride is not of 
example in meekness and humble- Jesus and if we bring up our little 
ness of heart. ones therein we are not suffering 


suade us to enlist under his ban- 
ner; it is then liis greatest delight 
if he can cause a follower of Christ 
to yield to temptation and thus pre- 
vent others from becoming liis dis- 
ciples. AVe frequently hear re- 
marks made by people of the world, 
of professing Christians, that many 
of them are hypocrites, and this is 


In James 4: 0, we read, “God them to come unto him but we are U 0 feared is too true. To such 


we would say, Judge not, for we 


resisteth the proud, but givefh grace j loading them astray. we would say, Judge not, for we 

to the humble, ' verse ]o, “ilmnhlc Oh letus, instead of plantingpride must all appear before God and 
yourselves in the sight oi the Lord ; in their little hearts, earnestly ad- give an account of the deeds done 
and again in 1 Jn. 2: 10, “ For all monish Ahem and tell them the dan- in the body whether they be good 
that is in the world, the lust of the ger and evil that is in it. May God or bad. It will make no difference 
tiesli, and the lust of the eyes, and help us th:J we may be earnestly then whether we are church meui- 
the pride of life, is not of the Fa- engaged in the discharge of our du- bers or not, if we have not been siu- 
ther, but is ol the world. Now if t v towards our dear little children, cere in serving God, and endeavor- 
we bring up our children in, and in bringing them up in the nurture ing to live in accordance with his 
nffer the vaiu.fashions of the world ! and admonition of the Lord, so I will. Even as Christ was tempted 


HERALD OF TEIJTH. 


by Satan, so also are his followers 
now. We should be continually 
preparing and arming for the battle, 
that we may be able to stand in 
the evil day of sharp temptation; 
and we shall find that a believing 
acquaintance with the word of God, 
and the sword of the Spirit will be 
more needful for us in our passage 
through the country of our enemies, 
than even our ordinary raiment. 
The Lord may see proper to permit 
the evil one to harass us grievously, 
and even to baffle us in painful con- 
flicts, that he may thereby prove, 
humble, and sanctify us, and show 
the power of his grace in making ns I 
at length more than conquerers. But 
nothing so certainly forebodes a 
fall in a professed disciple of Christ 
than self confidence connected with 
disregard to warnings. 

Willi avi n. Huber. 

Medway, ClarJc Co., Ohio. 


For the IIoraM of Truth. 

Glory of the Cross. 

“ God forbid that 1 should glory, 
save in the cross of our Lord Jesus 
Christ,” Gal. G: 14. 

“The heavens declare the glory 
of God; and the firmament sheweth 
his handiwork. There is no speech 
nor language where their voice is ! 
not heard.” Nothing which meets | 
the human eye can impress the i 
mind with more powerful convic- 
tions of the omnipotence of the Cre- 
ator than the beautiful array of • 
starry hosts which bespangle the ! 
heavens. When we think of those 
countless worlds (many so distant 
as not to be visible to the naked i 
eye), as the work of one great Being, 
we feel to say, “ What is man, that 
thou art mindful of him, or the Son 
of Man that thou visitest him,” we 
feel to acknowledge that we have 1 
naught of which to glory. 

How mean appear the greatest 
achievements ever made by man. 
Though they be the works of one so 
talented, possessing a mind of such 
profound depth as was never before 
possessed, and those faculties devel- 
oped to their utmost capacity, they 
can never be seen in the resplen- 1 
dent glory which surrounds the 
works of God's creation. They will 
thank the light that, hides them j 
a nd their shame. To him who j 
boasts of his strength and glory, 1 
kt the words of the Psalmist come 
w ith their greatest force, “Where 


wast thou when I laid the founda-l 
tions of the earth.” “ Declare if\ 
thou hast understanding A Veil ( 
might Paul say, although few pos- 
sessed the intellectual power he did, 
“God forbid that I should glory 
save in the cross of our Lord Jesus 
Christ.” 

And this cross which was liis glo- 
ry, was viewed by the world as a 
reproach, even to a vile man. Yet 
he had nothing like unto it. It was 
the glory of liis life. For this he 
suffered untold trials. For this he 
gave his all; seeking and desiring 
nothing more. This was his great 
theme. He went even to the men 
who had crucified liis Savior; the 
men who took delight in massa- 
cring and torturing those who be- 
lieved in the cross, and preached 
unto them the words of mercy and 
love. He acknowledged to the 
world that his past course had been j 
wrong, and that Christ was the Mes- ! 
siali; that Christians were the true; 
worshippers of the living God. ! 
Oh! there was power in that cross 
to Paul, or he never could have en- 
dured so much for its sake. He 
asked not the honor or applause of 
men, but courted the greatest dan- 
gers for an opportunity to preach 
Jesus to a dying world. Can as 
much be said for the ministers of 
to-day? Do they not rather say, 
“Your blood be upon you, I will 
urge you no longer?” Oil! dis- 
heartened laborer, give not way to 
discouragements. Leave not the 
sinner to his fate, for to-morrow, lie 
whom you might have saved may 
sleep in death, beyond the reach of 
redemption; then can you say, I 
warned him often but lie would not 
h e ar? No! No! Follow Cue- exam- 
ple of 3 T our Divine Master and his 
faithful apostle. Remember that 
he only who remains faithful to the 
end shall receive the crown of life. 
Do not weary in well doing. Still 
hold up the cross as a remedy for 
sin; continue to preach its healing 
virtues, and if present fruits make 
not their appearance cease not to 
work in faith and yon will see the 
power of God. 

Remember that he who is faithful 
in few things shall be master over 
many things, and the master's joy is 
yours, “The servant is not above 
his master,” and as he suffered, it 
becometh us to suffer. Barabbas, 
the robber, was honored but lie who 
was pure and holy, disgraced. Do 
not expect great favors of the world; ! 


for the world loves its own; and if 
.you receive much of its honor it is 
strong evidence where you belong. 
“The wisdom of the world is fool- 
ishness with God.” Have yon 
been seeking this wisdom? if so, be 
assured it is all in vain. Turn now 
and hear the word of the Lord. 
“Oh Israel, thou hast destroyed 
thyself; but in me is thine help.” 
Lot ns use the world asthough weliad 
it not. Let us all glory in the cross 
rather than in all the encomiums 
the world can heap upon us; for 
they shall perish and leave us help- 
less aud ruined at last; but the cross 
will gloriously triumph over all its 
enemies and make its faithful fol- 
lowers, beautiful pillars in the tem- 
ple of the New Jerusalem. 


For the llerald of Truth 

The Daly or Parents to Children. 

In tiie December No., of the Her- 
ald, appeared an article under the 
above head, written by a youim- 
friend, with the request that more 
be said on the same subject. It is 
of far greater importance than many 
parents imagine. Theyoung broth- 
er gave some very good and reason- 
able ideas; and I feel like tryingto 
add a few more. The character which 
men and women form, depends a 
great deal upon the example, and 
instruction given on the part of par- 
ents to them in childhood. Hence 
the necessity of training them in 
the right direction when j r oung, 
while their minds are being form- 
ed. Parents should be kind both 
in word and action, yet he firm. 
They should speak no ill of their 
neighbors, teach them to be kind 
aud charitable to others; to mani- 
fest sympathy, and liberality to the 
poor, and by so doing they make 
good impressions on the minds of 
their children. Early impressions 
are generally lasting. 

They sjPmld converse with 
them about Jesus, of heaven, of the 
holy angels, and of all good peo- 
ple; that all who love and obey Je- 
sus will go to heaven when they 
die. How much better it would be 
to have their minds thus employed, 
than to give them loose reins to 
their passions, in following pride, 
the fashions of the world, and many 
evils to which human nature in- 
clines. Many parents rather en- 
courage the spirit of -ill-will, and 
disobedience than otherwise, by 



HEBALD OIF 1 TBUTH. 


gtprit 


harsh words, threatening them with 
things they never will do. These 
things cause many to he disobedi- 
ent, and go from bad to worse, and 
sometimes they leave their homes, 
go in bad company, become drunk- 
ards, liars, gamblers and such like, 
thus both body and soul are brought 
to ruin. Who are to blame in a 
great measuie for this? Must we 
not answer: Parents, because of the 
neglect of duty on their part? 

May God in his mercy aid us by 
his Holy Spirit to discharge the du- 
ties enjoined upon us in laboring 
for the spiritual, as well as the tem- 
poral welfare of our children; and 
in bringing them up in the nurture 
and admonition of the Lord, and 
teach them that nothing but repent- 
ance and faith in the Lord Jesus 
Christ will qualify them for the 
kingdom of heaven. 

J. K. Steckley. 


For the IleraM of Truth. 

HUMILITY. 

Whosoever therefore shall humble 
himself as this little child, the same 
shall be greatest in the kingdom of 
heaven,” Matt. 18 : 4. 

Ambition has been the ruin of myriads of 
souls. Love of applause has ever been a 
powerful motive in briugtng into action the 
faculties of man, notwithstanding these 
powers are God-given and designed to hon- 
or him, rather than man. Yet the innate 
depravity of the human heart turns from its 
true channels that which might be the glory 
of man and the joy of his Master, and 
makes it his servant for selfish ends ; thus 
refusing to recognize the Lord’s right to his 
service, or the power of the Creator over 
the creaturo. There must be a change in 
such a heart before the grace of God can 
reach it. Hence conversion becomes a ne- 
cessity ; for the natural inclinations must be 
overcome. 

Paul tells us that naught but a new creat- 
ure avails. Wc must be born of the Spirit 
before we can possess ourselves of Christian 
graces. To be without them is death eternal; 
to possess them is life everlasting ; among 
them humility stands foremost. It is the 
very foundation stone of the Christian char- 
acter. Christ says, “Whosoever therefore 
shall humble himself as this little child shall 
be greatest in the kingdom of heaven.” 

Humility is made the condition of our ac- 
ceptance As we are humble so shall he 
our place in Divine favor Let no one think 
for a moment that he cm be a Christian and 
cherish in his heart a love of show, worldly 
distinction, and applause of men; for they 
can never harmonize with humility. God 
has made them directly opposite; and it is 
beyond the power of man to change them, 


or save his soul by attempting a compromise. 
You can not servo two masters. We often 
hear those who profess to bo followers ot 
Christ say, “It matters little what I wear, 
though it bo of fine material and gorgeous 
colors.” I fit does not hurt you what assur- 
ance have you that it is not a stumbling 
block to others. I warn you, be not de- 
ceived. The humble heart takes no pleas- 
ure in such things; Ay ! it shrinks from 
them, knowing that he who takes the adder 
into his bosom is in danger of being stung. 

This life is a continual warfare with the 
devil and his servants, and if we would 
come off victors we must not fight with the 
weapons which he has prepared for us. lie 
is pleased to have us glory in our own 
strength, for he knows that it is weakness. 
Gut when we throw aside our pride and 
lusts after the flesh and take up instead, the 
cross, he fleeth and we are safe. What if we 
are obliged to deny ourselves many pleas- 
ures we faiu would enjoy. Every sacrifice 
brings its reward, for the Lord has said, “If 
ye suffer for righteousness’ sake, happy are 
ye,” and to him that overcoweth I will give 
a crown of life "When we think of these 
blessed promises, who would not suffer un- 
told trials for that which is to come’/* But 
we need not suffer the loss of our earthly 
pleasures if we seek humility. On the con- 
trary it is the only way to secure perfect 
peace, happiness, and liberty. Christ says, 
“My yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” 

I “ Come unto me all ye that labor and are 
heavy laden and I will give you rest.” 

If then this is the only true way to hap- 
piness in this life, and in the life to come, 
how unwise that we should neglect it. Ay 
more, how sinful to refuse these means of 
salvation, purchased with the blood of our 
blessed Redeemer. May the Holy Spirit 
abide with us, that wc may grow to be true 
reflectors of the light which cometh from 
above ; always doiug our duty in mcekucss; 
not glorying in that we are preferred before 
others but rather thankful that the Lord 
has put it into our hearts to serve him. 

R. 


For tli» Herald of Truth. 

Bear the Yoke. 

•‘Take my yoke upon you, and learn 
of me; for 1 am meek and lowly in 
heart; ami ye shall find rest unto your 
souls,” Mat. 1 1 : 29- 

The yoke of Christ is his commaudments; 
but there is a great diversity of opinion re- 
garding the commandments of Jesus. Con- 
tention and strife frequently arise in t lie 
church, and this often takes place, first 
among the ministers. _ Some contend that, 
this way is right and others that that is 
right, and thus the strife continues until the 
wolf comes among the sheep and they are 
scattered abroad as it were without a shep- 
herd. Have those the yoke of Christ upon 
them l and do they learn this from the meek 
and lowly Jesus’? nay verily not, but if the 
true followers of the Lord once become 


aware of this evil, and see that if they do 
not forsake sin and the pleasures of the 
world.they must be cast out from the presene- 
of God and be forever lust. If they will 
truly take up the yoke of Christ, he will 
give them rest. They will then have passed 
from death unto life. They are now cruci- 
fied with Christ ; nevertheless they live ; yet 
not they but Christ lives in them. Thev 
have the Holy Spirit upon them. The Lord 
teaches them to do that which is right and 
leave that which is wrong. They now speak 
the same thing; there is no division anion.: 
them, and they ate perfectly joined togethcrin 
the same mind and in the same judgment. 
They are the body of Christ and in lowliness 
of mind each will esteem others better than 
themselves. 

They go on rejoicing and kuow that it' 
their earthly house of this tabernacle were 
dissolved, they have a building of God, a 
house not made with hands, eternal in the 
heaveus. in the II dy City, Xew Jerusalem, 
where the light of the city is God himself. 
There all the saints who are now scattered 
abroad iu this world of trouble and sorrow, 
who long to meet each other, can meet never 
to part. May God awaken sinners that 
they may have no rest until they find it iu 
the wounds of a once crucified hut now risen 
Redeemer, and that thousands may come 
flocking home to Christ. A hearty welcome 
now awaits them, and the angels will rejoice 
at their coming. 

D. W. Hare. 


For the Herald of Truth 

4i In the Beginning was the Word," 

•John 1 : J. 

Dear young friends, I suppose you ail 
know that God made all things; that “ail 
tilings were made by him ; and without him 
was uot auything made that was made.” He 
created the heaven and the earth, and ail 
things that are therein. He is a living and 
a true God. “In him was life: and the 
life was the light of meu.” 

What a merciful God fib is. Let us obey 
him and cast our cares upon him, for lie 
carcth for us. lie gives us our daily fool 
to nourish our bodies. If he would with- 
hold his bountiful hand, these bodies won! 1 
soon die for want; so it is with our souls, i. 
they do not receive heavenly bread they 
will perish. If wc are uot willing to J* 
something for the salvation of our souls, we 
cannot enter into the kingdom of heaven 
Wc must be horn of the water and of the 
Spirit ; we must come to Jesus, must par- 
take of spiritual things. So long as we an 
not willing to do this we are hoveling on 
the broad road that leadeth to destruction 
Our God is a merciful God, and uot wish 
ing that we should die in our sins, he kind 
ly invites all to come Unto him; to see!, 
him early, and remember him as our Crea- 
tor, in the days of our youth. The great- 
est and mo3t important work we have to 
perform in this life is to care for our souk 


1872 


OF TBUTH 


55 


to reconcile ourselves to God, and be pre- 
pared to meet him in peace when wc are 
railed from time to eternity. We must, 
sooner or later, all appear before the J udge 
of all the earth, to render an account of our 
conduct, or deeds done in the body, whether 
they be good or bad. Therefore, “ Remem- 
ber now thy Creator in the days of thy 
voutb, while the evil days come not, nor 
tlhi^years draw nigh, when thou slialt say, 
I have no pleasure in them.” 

W>ft C. Livengood. 

Dale City, Pa. 


For tlin IlornlJ of Truth. 

LINES 

Written on the death of Catharine Maun, who 
died the 30th of Jan., 1872, in Elkhart Co.. Ind. 

She is now where pain and sorrow , 

Sin and death can never come ; 

Gone to join the holy angels 
In that bright and happy home. 

-It is true we loved her dearly. 

Cut the Savior loved her best ; 

To relieve her of her suffering 
He has taken her to rest. 

Though the thought that she ha3 left us, 
Will fill our hearts with pain ; 

We know that our loss, although groat, 

Is her eternal gain. 

She has not left us forever, 

She has only gone before, 

Where we all again can meet her 
When our pilgrimage is o’er. 

But we too must love the Savior, 

And obey his blessed word ; 

Like her’s all our desires must be 
To know and serve the Lord. 

And if we hold ont faithful, 

Till the storm of life is past; 

Though the way seem long and dreary, 

We shall meet in heaven at last. 

M. K. 


For tho Herald of Truth 

An Exhortation. 


Dear brethren and sisters, Have 
you ever thought of the privileges 
ihat are extended to us! Think, O 
think, if we should be cast into that 
horrible pit, where there will be 
weeping and gnashing of teeth, 
with no hope of the torment ever 
**nding. Let us reflect on the gold- 
en opportunities we have to serve 
our blessed Savior and Father, who 
promises rest and everlasting hap- 
piness to his obedient children, 
yea such as tongue cannot express. 

Stop not at idle things, and world- 
ly temptations. Be careful in your 
walk and conversation. “ Walk 
by faith and not by sight." Let us 
pray for one another, for all god- 
fearing people, that we may remain 
faithful. Pray for the unconverted, 
that their eyes may be opened to 
see the dangers to which they are 
exposed. 


To the unconverted I would say, 
Commence now to pray to the Al- 
mighty God, who loves you, if you 
wish to enjoy a state of never-end- 
ing happiness. Oh, pause for a 
moment and reflect what you are! 
Choose ye this day whom ye will 
serve. Think not that a more con- 
venient season will come than now. 
In a moment your doom might be 
sealed, and the day of grace forev- 
er lost. What if you should have 
many years yet allotted to you in 
this world, in which to enjoy the 
pleasures it affords, it could avail 
you nothing, if when at your .jour- 
ney's end, you should hear the un- 
welcome sentence, “Depart from me 
all ye workers of iniquity.” 

In the short time allotted to us 
here, we have sufficient time to work 
out our salvation, if we begin just 
now, if we make this theconvenient 
season. The Savior says, “Come un- 
to meallyethatlabor and are heavy 
laden, and I will give you rest. 
Take my yoke upon you and learn 
of me; for I am meek and lowly in 
heart; and ye shall find rest unto 
your souls; for my yoke is easy, 
and my burden is light.” 

Now if you will come to Jesus 
and unload your guilt, you will 
have an easy yoke, and a light bur- 
den to bear. .* * 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Rejoice. 


Christians have many reasons 
for rejoicing in view of the glorious 
prospects in store for them in the 
better world. Many do rejoice and 
are happy even amidst afflictions. 
Why can we not all be more cheer- , 
ful and happy ? Why are so many 
down-hearted, so seldom full of that 
inward joy which passeth all under- 
standing? The following article 
picked up lately is so to the point that 
I copy it, as it expresses tho matter 
, better than I can. 

“With the ineffable blessedness of 
heaven so sure and so near, why do 
we feel so much the hardships, the 
troubles, the losses incident to 
earthly life? Soon we shall be in 
everlasting rest and satisfaction 
and joy. Pain can sting but a lit- 
tle longer. All tears are to bo 
wiped forever away from our eyes. 
In God's own glory and bliss are 
we to dwell and rejoice! .Might not 
such a prospect give us more cheer 
than we have? Could not should 
not a hope so gladsome teach us 


not to sing so many of onr songs on 
a minor key? Is there not in it a 
balm to heal our severest wounds ? 
A gloomy countenance, despairing 
impatience, sighing over seeming 
ills, — why are they ever seen and 
experienced among the pilgrims to 
‘ a better country, even an heaven- 
ly?’ Ah, the faith that reveals the 
invisible is not ours as an abiding 
light, but rather as a Bash that now 
and then cleaves the terrible dark- 
ness all around us. Its beaming is 
as startling as helpful. We walk 
by it with more of trembling than 
assurance. So little do we realize 
the glorified Christ as our life now 
and eternally, that he fails to be to 
us as we need lie should, an evey 
unclouded sun. ‘Rejoice ever- 
more.' 

If you are worn with toil that will 
last as long as your strength, you 
need to look forward to a reward 
better than a livelihood or wealth. 
When disease is killing us, we 
want to know that in the end the 
victory will be ours. A dim belief 
that there remains something which 
shall more than compensate ns for 
the calamities of the present is not 
enough. With only that onr tears 
must be bitter, our burdens crush- 
ing, our weakness and torture dis- 
tressing. We must have our con- 
versation in heaven; must feel that 
we are risen with Christ; whilst 
still in conllict, must lean upon the 
throne awaiting us! Oh , for that 
enlightenment of the eyes of onr un- 
derstanding by which the saints 
may know what is the hope of God's 
calling, and what the riches of the 
glory of his inheritance in them! ” 

X. G. R. 


Resist the temptation of circula- 
ting ill reports; spread them not at 
all. If you cannot speak well of 
another, at least do not speak ili 
of him. Never speak ill of another 
behind his back. Why should you 
consider his character of less value 
than your own? Speak of others as 
youwbuld were they present : speak 
of him as a friend of him who is ab- 
sent, and cannot speak for himself. 

We should not delay nor dispute 
long, when w have God's com- 
mands; for God loves obedience, 
but hates delay.— Litiiee. 

Ho not wise in tliiiie own eyes : fear the.. 
Lord, ami depart from evil. 


• < 



HERALD OF TRUTH. 




leraltr of 


Correction.— The time of meetiug at 
Newcomer s Meeting-house, near Moultrie, 


Conferences. 


W**tt*U . V i ;; u The annual Conference for the State 

o ^ . Columbiana Co., Ohio, is Sunday, March w ill be held in Mahoning Couuty, 

. . TTI Anri I Ift79 ' 17th, and every l ^ ree wceks from tbat timo on the third Friday in May. The nearest 

fci 1 Knar t, 1 CL t p • forward, instead of every four weeks, as sta- station is Columbiana, on the Pittsburg; 

~~ = ~ 7 r , ’ tj>A : n February number Those who Fort Wayne and Chicago R. It. 

To olk S unscEi b e R 8. — If any of our subscribers do not W5tl in me I turuai) uuuu/oa. " * 

get their paper* regularly, or if any persons who send tor tQ v j s J^ tliCIXl will please observe this TlIE SEMI-ANNUAL CONFERENCES, in the 

books, *c., do not ohum them in due time, they will confer . Eastern district of Pennsr lvania, will be 

a f.*or by informing us, aud w win do our heat to hav. correction. helfJ on the fi ,. st Thursday in May, and first 

everything prope l y forwar ^ to us estm a ion. The Martyr’s Mirror in the En- Thursday in October, in Franconia Meeting- 

now to sits Mokkt. — if in sum* more than a dollar, it o-lish lan^ua^e. W e n*»w propose to reprint house, in Montgomery County. 

Z ZZlZL The Martyr’s Mirror in the English lan- The Semi-annual conferences, in Vir- 

regutered. rruage, as soon as a snfiBcient number of sub- ginia will be held on the last Iriday in 

. ° -l v April, and on the last Friday iu September 

Those of our subscribers who do not wish to take the SCriDCTS slifiil L»C ObtillDCU to Will 1 Ant US to * , 

or nucii voir 

Herald of Truth any longer, will please to inform us of un J erta k e the Work. By the time WC isSUC * . 

the fact by letter and pay np all arrearages, and the ^ TlIE ANNUAL CONFERENCE of the Ornish 

matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it win the next number of the Herald avc will Mennonite Church will meet the present 
considered that they wish to continue their snbBcr.pt.on *. m:ike an est i ma t c 0 f the cost of the work and 0(1 \y hit Sunday, in Lagrange County. 

lay the matter before our readers, and hope Indiana. This Conference Avill continue. 

On the 3rd O Marc , ro. enry obtain their help and co-opcration in the from day to day until the business of the 

Nice, of Morrison 111 , was on a visit to mader Conference is disposed of. 

thc church near W ashington, in Tazewell j The AXNUAL Conference in Ontario 

co., 111., where a minister was ordained. 1 Job 1 : 5.- The word translated UcsserJ will be hc ld on Friday, the 31st of 

The lot fell on Bro. Albrecht Schiffler. i or caned, iu the Greek has both meanings, M in Chr . E by s Meeting-house, near 
May the Lord bless him in the important j and therefore may be translated either Beflin> . f Lho Lord permit . A11 who dcsirc 

duties devolving upon him. This will no , cursed or Umcd as the sense may be. In to viait U3 wil l leave thc ears at Berlin The 

doubt afford thc brethren and sisters there j Job 2 : 0, Job’s wife said to him. “Curse Mcctiug _ house is about one mile distant, 

much pleasure, inasmuch as they have now | God aud die.” In the German this also 3 Tu u” Woolner 

been without a shepherd for some time. 1 reads, “ Segue Gott uud slirb.” Thc German 

We hopo the Tjord will bless the labors of translator seems in both these places to have COBlCrGUCC 111 Illinois. 

the church here, so that she may grow and taken the opposite from that of the English. 

increase and many souls be gathered into the But no doubt the English here in both in- la accordance with the decision of thc 
fold of Christ. We wish you God’s blessing stances is correct, as the sense of both pas. Conference in Indiana last Fall, that a new 

— be strong in the faith, confident in hope satrcs wou ],| Cf , (MU nioro naturi i *■, Conference distnet be formed lor the west 

. h . , ; ’ woum Peom aior ® natur ‘it to leau ern brethren, to be held m the state of Illi- 

earnes in prayer, an zea ous in goo wor s, curm i than blessed. uois, the brethren there have decided to hold 

and the Lord will be with you. j _ — their first Conference in that district, in 

^ ~ IT 777 , Men no Simon’s Complete Works, in their Meeting-house, near Sterling, in 

On Sunday February 4th, a dea- the Englis h i anRUag0 are now rea dy for de - Whiteside couuty, on the fourth Friday in 

coa was ordamed m the Monoonito Church, ,. ' A „ wh " wUl t „ obtain this Talua _ May, (Ma; 24th.) at which time and place 

in Owen County Ind. There were five breth- ,, * , , .. P , all the bishops, ministers and deacons, as 

r ., ni i < i in lnt b!o w,,rk m;, y have 11 Promptly forwarded vVe „ as a „ bret hren and sisters are cordially 

‘ to them, by sending in their orders to this and earnestly invited to be present, 

joorgo Funk, a lay t e grace of God be 0 flj co< The price of the work is 84 50 cents Inasmuch as this is the first Conference 
with him, and may his Spirit rest upon him Anv 1(f which our Church holds in the State of II- 


Jacob Woolner 

Conference In Illinois. 

In accordance with thc decision of the 
Conference in Indiana last Fall, that a new 
Conference district be formed for the west 


... . we hope our meeting together there, will 

ope our lnenu> p roV e a lasting benefit to all whose privilege 


with him, and may his Spirit rest upon him pcr co ,, y Any persou tak j og 0Qpies which our Church holds in the Stato of Il- 
ia such a measure that his uuderst an dill" -n ‘ ■ .. *v v liuois, it is earnestly desired that a3 many of 

may bo enlightened, and that he may be t , .• , , , , . the ministers ot our Church as can, irom all 

enabled to fulfill the important duties do- c *P cl,s ® j 1 ” 'transiting and publishing par ts of the country, should try to meet to- 

T . tho work, so that our people migut ha\ T o the gether there. 

volving upon him, in all faithfulness. Let . . . , , , . & a n 7 , ,, . • , . • 

. „ V. . . . , , , opportunity to examime and read the wri- A Conference hold in the right spirit. 

tho church pray for their ministers and dea .. . . „ , nnv lm tho mM ns nf «• innr»h o-unrl ami 

K e . (T . , c tings of the emmeut reformer whoso name may bo thc means ot Uomg much good, anu 

cons, “for the fervent effectual praj’er of . , . , , wo hope our meeting together there, will 

the righteous man availoth much,” and thus ,,ur c mrc 1 am wo nipt our item* prove a lasting benefit to all whoso privilege 

their minds and hearts may be strengthen- W,U fccl an il,terc ‘ st hl selling as many copies it shall be to attend. 

od, and they may be enabled to labor for a ‘ S P 0SS,bIc - S,n S le C °P 1CS o1 ' the work Tho Church is located several miles north 

the glory of God and the salvation of souls bc 8cnt b >’ mail - aud tho<, ° wi - sh5 »^ to bav ® "J th ° T™ 0 * Those co ) miu « 

S J them thus sent will please add filets to the the east will take the cars on tho Galena 

A Pni«.flonftnrtnni no v n . vi-. r . liiiuroad to Sterling. Tliose coming from 

L/Orresponaent asKS . Who was price for postage. It may bo obtained at ,u ,1 tiP • n . 1 n u 

/i • * -r 9 7 n r J the south on the Illinois Central will change 

Lain a wife.' tho following places: at Dixon and go west to Sterling. Should 

Answer: All we can say in regard to J. E. Barr’s Bookstore, Lancaster, Pa. no one be there to meet them, they will in- 

this matter is that she was Cain's wife. All J. C. Hunsicker, Berlin, Waterloo county, ( f ulrc f° r l >ro J° s - Allenbach, v\ r ho lives only 

the Bible gives on this point is that Cain Out. ’ ’ ’ a short distance north of town, where they 

went out from tho pre *ence of thc Lord and Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, Lancas- ' vb i, bo bos P' tab *y received. . 

, A J Should any brethren desire to visit them 

dwelt iu thc land of Nod, on the cast of ter county, la. at their regular time of meeting, they will 

Eden, and that he had u wife there. Jacob Punk near Line Lexington. Pa. obseiwc that the mooting at Sterling ooour- 


the south on the Illinois Central will change 
at Dixon and go west to Sterling. Should 
no one be there to meet them, they will in- 


HERALD OH TRUTH. 


red on the 25th of February and then every 
two weeks, and on the 3rd of March at Mor- 
rison and every two weeks thereafter. 

This invitation is exteuded by request of 
Bro. Henry Nice, on behalf of the Church. 


orrrsponbrnef. 


A Visit to Ohio. 

It was my happy privilege to enjoy a vF- 
it to Ohio, in company with Bro. Fuuk and 
family (of which Bro. Funk will inform the 
readers of the Herald). I will give but a 
brief statement of my visit to those places 
where Bro. Funk did not accompany me. In 
Putnam co , I consented to accompany broth- 
er George Brenneman. to attend a meetiugou 
Blanchard River, a distauce of some four- 
teen miles. It was a cold morning, and we 
dreaded the trip nevertheless duty call- 
ed aud it was ours to obey. We arrived at 
Sister Shenk’s, about their usual hour of 
meeting. We found the dear sister sick, and 
at the time suffering greatly, and we offered 
a few words of encouragement to her. Oa 
our wav to the church we had to cross a 
river which had risen to a considerable 
height, and were conveyed across in a canoe. 
Although there wore but few assembled, by 
reason ofthe inclemency of the weather, yet 
we enjoyed ourselves very much, and we be- 
lieve that by the blessing of the Lord our 
meeting will not bc in vain. Services over, 
we again returned to the home off our afflict- 
ed sister, aud after singiug, exhortation, 
and prayer, we weut to Christian Shenk’s, 
his wife being brother George’s daughter, 
whom I had not seen for several years. 
After a brief, but pleasant conversation with 
them, we proceeded to attend a meeting in 
the evening at brother George’s School- 
house, which was well attended, and we 
hope the humble efforts put forth, to declare 
the dying lovm of the Savior, will not be 
left unfruitful. 

The next morning brother George 
brought me to Allen county, where at tbe 
house of Bro. C. Brenneman, I again met 
Bro. Funk and family. Taking our leave of 
the dear brethren and sister^ here, we pro- 
ceeded to Wayne co., Ohio; thence to 
Holmes county. We also had meeting at 
the Sonnenberg Church, aud enjoyed our- 
selves quite well. Here we were informed 
of a burial which was to take place the day 
following, with the request, that one of 
us should attend. It was decided that l 
should attend the funeral, whilst Bro. Funk 
went to attend a meeting which had been 
announced at Culp’s Church. Bro. Jacob 
Kiluier couveyed me to tho funeral, a dis- 
tance of fifteen miles. The weather being 
severely oold \vo suffered a great deal; but 
we thought of tho Poet who says : 

“Through heat and cold I’ve often went, 
And wandered in despair; 

To call poor sinners to repent, 

Aud seek the Savior dear.’’ 


The attendance was large. Many rela- 
tives and friends followed the dear Brother 
(Stauffer. See death notice), in tears to the 
gra\ - e. After services we returned yet the 
same day to Holmes county, where we spent 
several days very pleasantly, with the breth- 
ren iu holding meetings. We trust that 
the young people of this neighborhood, who 
were so nearly persuaded to be Christians, 
will not forget the impression made, and 
the resolutions formed whilst we were with 
them. God bless the dear young people ev- 
ery where, and help theiB to yield their 
hearts in willing obedience to the many calls 
and invitations of the blessed Savior, before 
it will be forever too late. 

From here we went to Wayne and Medi- 
na counties, and thence to Columbiana coun- 
ty, where after spending some time most 
pleasantly, and we trust profitably, Bro.- 
Funk returned to his family again in Medi- 
na county. I remained here a day longer, 
attended tlie funeral of the aged brother, 
Henry Kiudig. From here Bro. A. Xold 
conveyed me to Pro. Smith’s, with whom we 
stayed over night. On Sunday wo attended 
a funeral in the neighborhood alter which 
we went to Prc. Henry Walter’s, whose wife 
has been sick for some time, may the dear 
sister bc sustained by the grace of God. to 
endure her afflictions in the true spirit of 
meekness, aud Christian resignation. In the 
evening we had meeting at the Church, aft- 
er which we went to Pre. Newcomer’s, where 
after a brief but pleasant interview, Bro. 
llecd brought me yet the same night to Al- 
liance, a distance of ten miles. In the 
morning I took tho train and came via 
Cleveland, and Toledo, to Elkhart by two 
o’clock in the night. Found upon return- 
ing home, my family in usual health. 
Many thanks to God and the brethren for 
privileges bestowed, and kindness received. 

Yours iu brotherly love. 

Daniel B renn ema n. 

Elkhart, Tml 


Further account of the same 

On Saturday the 24 th of Feb., wo arrived 
in Allen Co., Ohio, and the same evening 
attended a meeting at the meeting-house 
there. The next day Bro. Christian Bren- 
neman accompanied me to a school-house, 
some ten miles distant, where wo also had 
a pleasant and well aUonded meeting. Aft- 
er meeting we visited Bro Huber, and in 
the evening had another very pleasant moot- 
ing at thc meeting-house. 

In Wayne Co., wo attended a meeting at 
Martin’s Meeting-house, where a goodly 
number were present- In the evening we 
had another meeting in a neighboring 
school house, where a l arge congregation 
was present aud good attention given. The 
services were in the English language, and 
we sincerely hope that our efforts to declare 
the glad tidings of salvation were not iu 
vain. Thore are here, Ave have reason to 
believe, a large number both young aud 


old people, who by a proper effort could be 
gathered into the church, and wc hope the 
brethren there will be earnest aud zealous 
iu their efforts to gither the precious souls 
into the fold of Christ. We know there 
are some who feel iuterested iu their salva- 
tion, and wc hope it will not bc long before 
wc shall see many precious souls coming 
out on the Lord’s side. 

We arrived at Bro. George Mumaw’s in 
Holmes county, on Wednesday evening, 
Feb. 2Sth, and attended meeting at Longc- 
ueckcr’s Meotiug-house on Thursday and al- 
so on Thursday evening. We remained 
in this neighborhood until Sunday after- 

O t * - 

noon and attended seven meetings, most ot 
which wore well attended and we hope they 
proved interesting and profitable to all who 
AA’ere present. We also visited a number ot 
tlie brethren and si-tors aud had many 
pleasant, personal interviews. We were 

much encouraged by the lively interest man - 
ifested by many whom it avus our privilege 
to meet. We hope God will bless the church 
in this place, and grant, that it may grow 
and increase, and he the means through 
which many souls may be brought to God. 
Our last meeting here was held on Sunday 
forenoon. ’The house was crowded, and a 
deep interest appeared to prevail. We hope 
we shall not soon forget the impressive oc- 
casion. After meeting we visited sister 
' Longcneeker, where also a number of breth- 
ren and sisters met with us and a couple of 
hours were spent A'cry pleasantly, aud wc 
hope not unprotit ably. Bro. Abm. Brenne- 
man, from Orrvillc, who had brought us to 
Holmes county, and accompanied us du- 
ring our stay there, now again took us 
hack to Bro. Samuel Breuneman’s. near Orr- 
ville, from whence we immediately proceed- 
ed to the school-house aud had another A'ery 
pleasant meeting there that evening. The 
house was very full, but such excellent or- 
der was presented that we indeed felt that 
it was praiseworthy. "We spent the night 
Avith Jacob Brenneman, and thc next morn- 
ing Bro. Adam Brenneman took us to Bro. 

| Henry Beery ’s who, after a short visit, ac- 
companied ms to Bro. Mi ch a el Rohrer’e. 
Here I left Bro. Brenneman who spent tho 
night Avith the aged brother and bishop 
Abin. Ro’nrer, while I went on to meet my 
family, Avho had preceded me several days 
in order to visit our relatives re- 
siding in this vicinity. Wo met. at Bro. 
David Nold’s, where avc spent the night, 
and where Bro. Daniel Freed’s were also 
with us. Thc next day, Tuesday, Mar. 2nd, 
wo had meeting at (he Lower Mooting house- 
where, although the weather was very cold, 

1 a large congregation was present. Loiv- 
tny family to visit among our relations, we 
j again returned t > Adam Bronncman’s, in 
; tiic afternoon, in thc neighb or hood of Orr- 
ville, and attended an interesting meeting 
that evening in a neighboring school-house. 

On Wednesday forenoon wc attended an 
appointment am mg our Ornish brothreu iu 
the meeting-house near Smithville. Here 
1 a largo number of people waro present 


ZETFIR^IDID OF TBUTH. 


g^pril 


though the weather was very cold. Here Sister Leatherman has suffered severely 
we also met Bro. Lantz of‘ the Ornish from ill health during the past winter, but 
Church, from Lawrence county, l J a. The , has partially recovered again, so that she is 
brethren J. K. Yoder, J. Schtnucker, and , able to be up a portion of the day. We 
others were also present, and we had a very hope the Lord will be with her in her afflic- 
pleasant and interesting meeting. May tions and give her strength to bear with 
God bless the church in this place to the patience and meekness the trials and tribu- 
salvation of many souls. lations of this present life, lor our sufferings 

On the afternoon of the same day we here are but for a moment, and “work for us 
took the train and came to Lcctonia, in Co- a far more exceeding and eternal weight of 
lumbiana county, where we were met by glory,” in the world to come. Letusthere- 
Bro A. Nold who took us to his bouse. In lore comfort our hearts with the thought 
the evening we had meeting at N old’s j that when our* sufferings here are past, we 
Meeting-house. The next day we had have the promise of a life where sorrow and 
services both in the forenoon ami afternoon suffering can never come; and where all is 
at Overholtzer’s Meeting house, and spend- peace and joy which shall never end. 
ing the night with Bro. Jacob Yoder, I In the evening we had another large aud 
started the next morning for Medina conn- attentive meeting at Poe. In this noigh- 
ty, where I had promised to lie present at borhood a deep interest seems to have been 
two appointments on Sunday. Ahoutseven manifested on the subject of religion, and 
o’clock I arrived at Alpheus Moyer’s where many have resolved to walk in the better 
I remained with my family during the way. We hope God will direct them in 


1 he next day wc visited friends j that better way, so that they may indeed 


and acquaintances, which brought to my take up the cross aud follow the footsteps of 
recollections the happy scenes of many a the meek aud lowly Jesus, and thus be faith 
bygone year. Here I met several of my school- ful unto the end. After meeting wc again 
mates whom 1 had not seen for twenty years returned to Bro. Leatherman ’s and on our 
or more. It need scarcely bo told that our way we stopped with Bro. Isaac Kilmer, 
meeting was pleasant, and I felt thankful whose daughter was very sick with a fever, 
that alter so many long years, God once and also very deeply concerned in regard 
more permitted us to meet. But our inter- to her eternal welfare. We hope the Lord 
view was necessarily brief, and we must may speak peace tb her soul and give her a 
part again. God alone knows whether it sweet and abiding hope in Christ, who is 
shall he our happy lot ever to meet again, the only Redeemer of the world, and through 
hut I hope 1 may meet them all in a better whom alone we can be saved, 
land. Therefore, dear friends, if you have The following morning, Wednesday Mar 
entered upon the way ol life, continue there- 1 3th, we took the train at Wadsworth and 
in, and be faithful; hut if you have not yet affer spending a portion of the day very 
done so, do not delay — time is precious, pleasantly with our friend John Strebcl and 
now is the accepted time, and the day of family, iu Cleveland, we arrived home safely 
salvation. iu the morning of the 14th. 

We spentthe night at Bro. Daniel Freed’s. We had a pleasant trip. We hope much 
During the evening we visited Bro. Mar- good may have been accomplished by our 
tin Oberholtzer, who is in such feeble humble efforts. Wc feel truly thankful t ) 
health that lie could not attend the meet- God for his kind aid and rich blessinf. 
ings. \\ e therefore held a short service Wc feel thankful to our friends, and the 
there, and hope the aged brother may brethren and sisters, wherever we have been, 
have felt encouraged and comforted on his for their kindness and love. May God re- 


pilgrimage, by the meeting. 

The next nay there was meeting at the 
Now Meeting-house, in the forenoon, in the 
German language, and in the afternoon at 
the same place in the English language. 
Both meetings were well attended, and we 
hope all were edified thereby. 

On Monday we had another meeting in 


for their kindness and love. May God re- 
ward them. Much more might have been 
said iu this account, hut time compels us to 
he brief. We have met with many warm 
hearted and earnest souls. Wcsayto them, 
Be faithful. We h ave met with many also 
who do not seem to feel, neither to see, how 
important it is that we make our calling and 
election sure, while it is an accepted time 


the Swiss Meeting-house, known as the “Chip- and a day of salvation. To such I say, Do 
pewa. Hero we had a large and interest- not delay; time is precious. Only two days 
mg meeting. Bro. Beery ulso being pres- ago wc stood around the mortal remains of 
cut; also the two brethren Steiner, who a dear young brother who in the strength of 
arc in charge of this church. \Vo also his years yielded up his life, and as wc hope 
'-pent a shoit time very pleasantly at the went home to God, leaving a widowed moth- 
house of Lro. ( lmstian Steiner In the or, sisters, brothers, and many friends to 


evening we had another large and attentive j mourn their loss, and while wc are pennin 0- 
meeting in the Union House, in the neigh- this article, we haste to finish it, that if we 
borhood or Smithville, whore Bro. C. K. arc spared to behold the morrow sun, we 
\oder of tlie Ornish Church, from Logan | may go to speak words of comfort and con- 
eount.y, was preseut, and also took part in j solation to another bereaved family, who 
(he services. Wo staid all night with Bro. have been called to mourn the departure 
Amstutz, and the next morning we went to ( of a dear son and brother, as his mortal re- 
Bro. Martin Leatherman’s, near Wadsworth 'mains are consigned to their final resting 


I place, who too in the prime of his years has 
been called away, as we hope to a better 
world. “ Therefore be ye also ready ; for 
in such an hour as ye think not the Son of 
man cometh.” J. F. Funk. 

m % ^ 

From Augusta Co., Ya. 

Dear brethren and sisters and all who 
rettyl the “Herald of Truth,” I have 
not written anything for the paper for some 
time, but I am still a reader of it. I must 
acknowledge that I have not been silent for 
the want ot love towards God and the dear 
brethren and sisters; but ou account of my 
inability to write articles for our paper. — 
Through love to God, tlie great cause of 
our Savior, and being a lover of souls, I feel 
constrained to take up my pen to write a 
short article. For we arc not in the dark 
but know “ that now it is high time to 
awake out of sleep; for now is our salvation 
nearer than when wc (first) believed,” Rom. 
13 : II. The apostle here reminds us of the 
duty we owe to God, and to ourselves. It 
is now gospel time, it is now harvest time, 
it is now day-time, it is now working time, 
it is now the accepted time wherein our la- 
bors, in working out our soul’s salvation will 
he accepted. “ The night is far spent, the 
day is at hand” and the day of our salva- 
tion is drawing nigh, that is, our redemp- 
tion from this world of sorrow, is nearer 
than when we first believed; the night of 
ignorance and darkness is far spent aud we 
are now nearer our eternal happiness than 
we were when we first embraced and took 
upon us the profession of Christianity. So 
let us mind our way, and mend our pace, 
for we may soon he called to give an ac- 
count of ourselves to God, the Judge of all 
the earth. It is now high time to lay off' 
the works of darkness, and put on the arm- 
or of light, and not be as the heathen who 
know nothing of God and the great salva- 
tion through Jesus Christ. As the people 
of the gospel day, we should be up and 
awake; not sleeping as many do, but he 
busy at the gospel work, and not as idlers 
walking about doing nothing for their own 
souls, nor for the souls of' others. Let us 
lay off pride, haughtiness, envy, hatred, 
strife, and contention, and let us put on the 
armor of light. Let us walk as the children 
of light. I say to all my fellow laborers, 
let us he active and earnest in preaching 
the glorious gospel of our Lord and Savior, 
to a lost and ruined world. Dear brethren, 
let us not he slack nor sit down and begin to 
slumber as some do. Let us not suffer our- 
selves to he led off by every wind of doc- 
trine, hut let us hold fast to that faith which 
was once delivered to the saints. Lot us 
look to our great interest iu this matter and 
to the glory of God; for our great enemy, 
Satan, is busy at work: he is every where as 
a ravening lion seeking whom he may do 
vour. 1 would say to all professors of 
Christianity in every branch of the church 
of God, let us be faithful servants in the 
Lord’s vineyard so that we can hear that 



59 




1 . 1 , ’ gk ’ J, 1 1 . ■ 1 


1872 


ECFF/.AUL.ID OF TRUTH. 


welcome voice, “Come ye blessed of my Fa- 
ther, inherit the kingdom prepared for you 
from the foundation of the world.” I will 
say to the unconverted, Come to J esus while it 
is to-day ; forsake your sins; yea, stop, poor 
sinner, stop and think before you make an- 
other downward step. Your way is dark 
and leads to everlasting destruction 

Turn, oh turn ! why will you die ? 

God, your Maker asks you why ? 

Jacob ihldebraxo. 


and the next morniug he took me to Elkhart, 
where after spending a short time with Bro. 
Funk. I took the cars for home. 

I feel thankful for the love and kindness 
manifested towards me by the brethren and 
sisters with whom it was my privilege to 
meet. I wish God’s blessing to all, and may 
the kind Giver of every good and perfect 
gift lead us all iu the way of truth and holi- 
ness and at last bring us to that rest prepar- 
ed for tlie people of G od. 

Burr Oak, Mich. C. D. BeERY. 


A Visit to Elkhait Co., Inti. 

I left home on Friday morning, March 
22nd, took the cars at Burr Oak, and arriv- 
ed at Elkhart about 10 o’clock P. M., and 
spentthe night with Bro. Henry B. Brenne- 
man, who had just returned from his trip to 
Pennsylvania aud Ohio. 

On Saturday there was meeting at Shaum’s 
where I was present, aud then in company 
with Bro. J. Culbertson went to Bro. Tobias 
Blosscr’s. In the evening we visited sister 
Curtis who has for some time been confined 
to the house on accouut of ill health. We 
there held a short service aud endeavored to 
speak words of comfort and instruction, 
which we hope were edifying to her and 
acceptable to God. We spent the night at 
Bro. Blosser’s and the next day went to 
Yellow Creek to meeting when? there was a 
very large and attentive audience. 

Iu the afternoon, by special request I went 
to Bro. Joseph Krupp’s, whose daughter 
Catharine desired to he baptized and receiv- 
ed into the church, she not being able to 
attend public worship on accouut of delicate 
health. She seemed to be much concerned 
for the salvation of her soul, and for some 
time past she has felt a desire to take upUhe 
cross and follow iu the footsteps of the dear 
Redeemer. We trust and hope that she 
may be faithful in her resolution to serve the 
Lord, and that her example may also have 
a good influence upon her young friends 
and companions, that they may also iu this 
accepted time, seek to make their calling and 
election sure, and become disciples of the 
meek and lowly Jesus. 

On Sunday evening we again had meeting 
at Yellow Creek, where a goodly number 
were present Good attention and good 
order prevailed, and we hope the good seed 
may uot have been sown in vain. 

I staid all night with Bro. Jacob Buzzard, 
and on Monday auother meeting was held at 
Yellow Creek, where a minister was ordained. 
There were six candidates proposed, and the 
lot fell upon Bro. Christian Christophol. 
May the Lord he with him and bless and 
strengthen him in the important duties thus 
laid upon him, and may he bo an instrument 
in the hands of the Lord through whom 
much good may be accomplished, aud many 
souls brought into the fold of Christ. 

After meeting I in company with Bro 
Henry Shaurn made a short visit with Bro. 
Christopbel, and then I went home with 
Bro. Shaurn and staid with him all night. 


A Visit to Stark Co., Ind. 

On the 1 7 tlx and 18th of February, the 
brethren, Samuel Yoder, David Hoover, 
and myself, had the pleasure of attending 
three meetings with the Amish brethren in 
Stark county. On Saturday we had meet- 
ing iu a school-house near Pro. D. Stouf- 
fer’s ; Sunday morning in Schneider’s School- 
house, and in the evening at the same place. 
These meetings were well attended, with or- 
derly and attentive audiences. Wc were 
received In a very friendly manner, and we 
felt ourselves at home with our Amish 
brethren. The following day wo returned 
home. M. W. Shank. 


From Knox Co., Tennessc. 


Our Sabbath School, which was closed 
for tho winter, was rc-opcned the 24thofMarch 
and has been well attended since. Within 
the last few weeks our little flock of Amish 
Mcnnonites here in Tennessee has great- 
ly increased. We now number 54 souls, 
21 church members. We are yet without a 
minister, but we now have a deacon who 
exhorts us in our Sabbath Schools. 

S. S. IIartzler. 
Beaver Ri<hjc, Knox Co., Tour. 


(plbrtn’s department. 

My Travels. 

[The following account of my travels was 
intended for the March Herald, hut it was 
sent in too late. It was written after the 
20th of February. The remainder of my 
travels in Renrasylvania will appear in the 
May numberd \ 

Dear children, l am still visiting in 
Pennsylvania. I visited three weeks in 
Bucks and Montgomery counties, and en- 
joyed myself pretty well the most of the 
I time. I met there some very warm friends, 
who received me very kindly, hut found 
fewer readers of the Herald there than any 
place I have been. Among the readers of 
tlie Herald [ met some little boys and girls 
who were very glad to see mo ; we en- 
joyed ourselves together very pleasantly, 

: and we formed a friendship which I hope 
will never be broken. 

Now and then T meet a little friend who 


lias written to mo, within the last three 
years. With those I qm especially glad to 
meet, and form a closer acquaintance. I 
rejoice to meet so many who have, through 
my advice iu the Herald, formed a habit of 
reading the word of God. There is no 
telling how much good may grow' out of it. 
One thing I know, that with whatsoever the 
mind is stored when young it will remain 
fixed there through life ; aud if the children 
and youug people would try moro to fill 
their minds with that heavenly wisdom, 
which will lead them into those ways of 
pleasantness and peace, it would he a thou- 
sand times better lor them than the reading 
aud filling the mind with the foolish news- 
paper stories, novels, magazines aud worth- 
less books, which are only preparing mauy 
of those who read them to serve the wicked 
one. by jesting, foolish talking, and disobey- 
ing God’s holy word. 

While iu Bucks county 1 visited a Ger- 
man school, which was taught by Bro. Jocob 
Gross. I was very much pleased with the 
school ; as it reminded me of the time when 
I went to German school and read from tin* 
Testament, as nearly all read from this 
blessed book. Would it not be much better 
if the Bible and Testament were still 
more used in the comon schools ? Brothel 
Gross also gave them instruction in singing, 
with which I was much pleased. He kindly 
asked me to address the scholars, aud my 
heart being filled with love for these deir 
young friends, and a desire that they may 
be happy in this world and in the world to 
come, and that they might remember their 
Creator in the days of their youth, I com- 
plied with his request, and am happy to say 
I believe God was present, and the words 
which were spoken will not be lost or 
forgotten. 

The love which 1 felt in my heart lbr 
these youug friends canuot bo expressed. It 
was almost impossible for me to refrain 
from weeping as I thought of the value of 
their precious souls, and the temptations to 
which they are exposed in this wicked 
world. I tried to show them the pleasant- 
ness of walking iu the ways of wisdom, and 
the bitterness, pains and regret-' which are 
sure to follow those who refuse to walk 
therein ; but choose rather to obey and 
serve that wicked one, who neither can nor 
desires to give th in any happiness in this 
life nor in that which is to come. 

Dear young friends, will you accept and 
take heed to the advice of a friend who loves 
your souls, prays for yen and wishes you the. 
same happiness that he wishes to himself ? 
and will you not love and follow that Friend 
who gave his life for you. and now so kindlv 
invites you to couio to him that he ma\ 
make you happy? Or would you *tiil rather 
believe that Satan, and the vain, pretended 
pleasures of this world can afford you ln uo 
happiness than the pleasures which God 
promises to those who love and serve him ? 
May God bless you, and impress these thing- 
upou your minds so that you may never 
forget them 


and may we all meet in that 


60 


TZJElttJLTJD OF TRUTH 


blissful abode, where all is joy and peace 
and love. 

A few words to the little folks. — Were 
we not glad to see each other ? I am sure I 
was; and 0. how often I shall think of you 
now, and ask God to give you new, clean 
hearts, and remove far from you, vanity and 
lies. Some ofyou said you would ask God to 
take care of me I hope you will not forget 
it; for if we wish to be good we must have 
God to help us; and ho always d< e- 
when we feel that we need his help, and 
earnestly ask him. \ hope 1 shall never 
forgot you; and O, I cannot tell you how 
much l love you, and I wish you would all 
give your hearts to Jesus, and do nothing to 
displeise him. I want to meet you all in 
that ‘‘ happy home, far away.” 

May God come very near and bless those 
dear little girls who so kindly remembered 
me. I shall remember you as long as I live, 
and not for the presents only, but because 
I love yon, and feel that you love me. May 
God bless your dear parents, and your little 
brothers, and bring you all home at last, to 
live with him in that “ happy home, far 
away.” Your kindness towards me will never 
be forgotten. You have not only done it 
to me, but if I am one of Jesus' little ones, 
you have done it to him. 

I have some more to tell you about my 
travels, but my piece is getting too long, so 
l will close. But O, I just think of one thing 
more which I must tell you. One evening I 
went to the post-office expecting to get a 
letter from home, but there was none for me, 
and I felt very much disappointed ; hut 
found that the Herald had come, and the 
postmaster handed me the February number 
lor Brother Funk's father. 1 carried it home, 
and when I opened it and saw the pleasant, 
friendly, little letters from the children, my 
sad, disappointed heart was cheered and 
mado glad, to sco that my dear little 
friends still think of 

Brother Henry. 


Bear Brother Henry, As I now havo an 
opportunity, I will endeavor to write a few 
lines to the children. I am a child too, 13 
years old. I still keep on reading a chap- 
ter in the Bible overy day as assigned by 
Brother Henry, ami 1 hope you do the same: 
and that we may all receive a great benefit 
from it. Let us also try to please our par- 
ents, obey them in every thing, as the Bible 
teaches us, and let us also try to chocr 
Brother Henry in aU his labors for us, for 
we will never be able to repay him. lie 
has been in this county a good while, in 
which time I have mot with him three times 
and pleasant meetings they were. 

I hope those who have not had an opportu- 
nity to meet with him, may have one in the 
future. Ho also has very many beautiful 
and useful books with him to sell, which if 
wo read, will do us a groat deal of 
good. 

Bear fellow children, ever consider the 
greatnesj and gooduessof God. Just thiuk 


one moment of the things around us. Who 
was it that made the hills and valleys? and 
who gives us our daily food, and clothing? 
Was it not that great and holy God, who 
sent his only begotten Son into the world to 
bleed and die upon the cross for the remis- 
sion of our sins ? now he is in heaven sit- 
ting at the right hand of his Father, lie 
is now frfce from all suffering. Let us try 
to do all the good we can, that at the resur- 
rection we may euter into his kingdom and 
there be happy forever. 

I hope all the children that read the Her- 
ald \ will take the advice of Brother Henry, 
uud if they will they may become good chil- 
dren. John II. Mellinger. 

Suuder&burg, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

Letters from the Children. 


[I received so many letters from the little 
folks this month that there is not room for 
them all in the Children’s Department, so I 
will just give the names and a few Words 
of the letters, and hope my little friends 
will be satisfied. If 1 had been at home 
some of them would have been noticed 
sooner. Thank you, my little friends, for 
your friendly letters.] 

Margaret Stemcn, Nodaway Mills, Iowa, 
with whom I was well acquainted in Ohio, 
writes that she reads in the Bible often, and 
expects to read it through. 

Esther Ann Wideman, Stouffville, Ontario, 
writes that she reads the Herald, and wishes 
to join our Bible class. We receive you 
very cordially, little friend. 

Willie II. Stoner, Salunga, I’a., a boy 11 
years old, writes that he commenced at the 
beginning of the year, and read a chapter in 
the Testament and one in the Bible every 
day, and wishes that we all continue to read 
the Scriptures in this way. T visited Willie 
when I was in Pennsylvania. May God 
bless the dear boy. 

Solina J. Reesor, Belford, Ontario, writes: 
*• My two sisters and I read a chapter from 
the Testament every morning and one from 
the Bible every evening, and wish to con- 
tinue to do so through the year.” 

Jonathan Amslutz, Putnam county, Ohio, 
writes that he read Ilucbner’s Bible History 
through. This is a very good book, almost 
the same as the Bible. It is one of the best 
of books for young people. 

Little Abraham Sommer, Dalton Ohio, 
aged seven years, writes that lie is also going 
to road a chapter in tho Testament every 
day. I visited little Abraham, in my 
travels, May the Lord bless you, my dear 
little friend, and give you a hoart to love 
and obey him. 

Mary Isabella King.Minonk, 111., writes me 
a very interesting letter. I will auswer some 
time as soon as 1 can. Try to be good. 

llottie Garges, Doylestown, Pa., writes 
me a very pleasant and interesting letter 
for herself and her brother Abraham. I feel 
glad, doar little friends, that you still think 
of me. I hope you will remember the words 


^iml 

I told you. Be good, obedient children. 
Learn to love your best friend, Jesus. I 
would like to have visited you once more, 
but could not do so. 

Magdalena Eshleman, Wilmot, Ontario, 
writes: “I have commenced to learn tho 
tasks which you give us, and to read tho 
Bible through. I read a chapter every morn- 
ing and evening. I wish more would join 
us in the good work. Ought we not try to 
do good while we are yet young, before the 
evil days come, that we may not havo to say, 
we have no pleasure in them?” Yes, dear 
young friend, it would be a good thing if 
all young people would do as you say ; they 
would be much more happy in this 
world. If they' only knew how happy 
those feel who love and obey their God and 
Savior, they would soon all forsake the 
world, and join in with the children of God. 

Joshua Moser, Dalton, Ohio, 9 years 
old, writes that lie has read a chapter 
from the Testament every day except one 
since new year. I remember having been 
at your house, am glad you have not forgot- 
ten me. Write again. 

Anna Moser, Dalton, Ohio, 10 years old, 
writes: “ I intend, this year, to read a chap- 
ter from the Testament every day. I have 
read it'Giearly through. I intend also to 
read the Bible through. 

Martha Moser, Dalton, Ohio, 10 years 
old, writes: “I read in the Herald that to 
each child who would this year (1871) read 
a chapter every day, you would give a pres- 
ent.” This is a mistake; I do not recol- 
lect of having made such a promise. I 
promised and gave a present to each child 
who read a chapter from the Bible and 
learned a verse by heart, every day of the 
year 1S70. I would be willing to make a 
present to each one who reads a chapter 
every day, if I was able, but there are so 
many who do it, that I could not give each 
one more than a trifle. 

Ilettie Belsley, Washington, 111., 11 years 
old, writes that she read a chapter and 
learned a verse by heart every day for one 
month, and intends to continue on through 
the year. 

Isaiah Gross, Fountainville, Pa. Thank 
you for your kind letter. Ido not recollect 
you, but from what you say, I must have 
been to visit you. I am always glad to get 
letters from my friends. 

Elizabeth II. Sommer and Elizabeth 
Tsehantz, Dalton, Ohio, have written a very 
friendly and interesting letter to mo. Dear 
friends, I rejoice to hear of the step you have 
taken. May tho Lord bless you in your 
undertaking, and give you grace to hold 
out faithful, to become bright, shiniDg 
lights iu tho world, that those around you 
may sec your good works, and that God 
may be glorified. 


lie that is slow to anger is better than 
the mighty; and ho. that ruleth his spirit 
than ho that taketh a city. 


1872 


61 


ZEIIEIR/JLILZD OF TBTJTH. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

“Speak the Truth In Love.” 

My little readers, doubtless all know that 
there is a way of speaking that is winning 
and pleasant, while there is another way 
that is repulsive in its character. The first 
named way, which is “ Speaking the 
truth iu love,” is what I wish you to under- 
stand, and hope that you will remember 
what I say to you. Not only remember, 
but practice it iu your daily conversation, so 
that when you are cajled to leave this world 
and pass over to the “ better country,” you 
will have that sweet consciousness of not 
having offended any with unkind words. 

The apostle, in speakiug the words of this 
subject, evidently had reference, more es- 
pecially to ministers of the gospel; those 
who are set as watches over the “ saints,” 
to guide and direct them in the way of 
righteousness. IIo therefore teaches them 
the right way of speaking the truths which 
God has revealed to us, by the few fisher- 
men, and men of like spirit. -» 

It is not enough simply to instruct and 
enlighten people, “ proclaiming deliverance 
to captives, the opening of the prison to 
them that are bound,” and pointing them 
to “ the Lamb of God which taketh away 
the sin of the world,” in a selfish way, but 
in the spirit of love, which tends to soften 
the hardened heart, and persuade it to flee 
from destruction. Now then you will see 
that these words are also applied to chil- 
dren since Christ calls himself a husband- 
man, and in his field there are many differ- 
ent kinds of work to be done. 

But you may say you are too young to do 
anything. It is true you are not able to 
bear tho “burden and heat of the day” as 
the stroug man is, yet you can do something. 
When you are at home helping your fathers 
to work iu the fiield, the grains of corn that 
you drop will produce as large stalks as those 
which your fathers drop, aDd the ears of 
corn will be just the same. It is the same 
iu Christ’s field. If you drop a grain of 
precious seed here and there, when reaping 
time comes you will doubtless come rejoic- 
ing, bringing your sheaves with you. And 
the Master who has bidden you to work in 
his field, will surely not hold the smaller 
sheaves loss valuable and precious than those 
which have been gathered by abler hands. 

When the Sivior was here upon earth, lie 
often spoke of tho little children. lie made 
them a model by which men might see how 
they must become if they wish to enter in- 
to his kingdom. When his twelve disciples 
were at Capernaum they questioned among 
themselves which should be the greatest iu 
the kingdom of heaven. And Jesus, in order 
to make a clear and explicit answer, called 
a little child and set him in the midst of 
(hem. What a striking contrast to these 
disputing men. And what words of love 
and meekness follow as an explanation of 
the type. “Whosoever therefore shall hum- 
ble himself as this little child, the same is 
greatest in tho kingdom of heaven. And 


whoso shall receive one such little child in 
my name, receiveth me.” 

I must also notice the services that the 
lad with the five loaves and two fishes ren- 
dered Jesus while the great multitude was 
gathered arouud him upon the mountain. 
They stood listening to his teachings until 
“ the day was far spent,” and his disciples 
seeing that they were weary aud almost fa- 
tigued, came and told Jesus to send them 
away that they might go and buy them- 
selves food, but not wishing to send them 
away hungry, he commanded his disciples to 
give them to eat. And while Philip was 
questioning whether two hundred penny- 
worth would he enough that all might have 
a little, Andrew saith unto him, “ There 
is a lad here, which hath five barley loaves, 
and two fishes; hut what are they among so 
many?” 

It was not much but Jesus blessed it 
and it was sufficient to feed five thousand 
men, and twelve baskets full remained 
This was but a little boy, yet it was just the 
person whom Christ needed at this time to 
glorify liis name. II. A. MUMAW. 

Winesburtj, 0. 

Dear Brother Henry, I have never had 
the pleasure of seeing you ; but father takes 
the llerall of Truth aud I like to read the 
articles you write for thechildreu, and I hope 
it will do us all good to read them. I am 
twelve years old. This is the first letter 1 
have written for the Herald.. My sister, 
two brothers, and myself, are reading the 
Testament through. \Vc have got to the 
fifth chapter of the first epistle of John 
We commit to memory four or five verses 
every Sabbath. 1 am trying to be good and 
love Jesus ; and l hope that all our little 
friends that read the Bible will love him. 

We go to Sunday school nearly ever) 
Sabbath. Hiram Roiirer. 

Canton , Fallon County , Illinois. 


The following Table will show those who 
wish to read the Testament in the way pro- 
posed what chapter to read each day. 





FOOD F0RJHE1LAIVIBS. 

v^Ye shall diligently keep 
the commandments of the 
Lord your God, and his tes- 
timonies, and his statutes, 
which he hath commanded 
thee. Deut. 6:17. 






Hays. 

Clutpcer. Itayti. 

Clutpiei 

Ap 

r. 14 

2 Cor. 

8 Apr. 

30 

Eph. 5 


15 

t( 

9 May 

1 

“ G 

ti 

16 

it 

10 “ 

2 

Phil, l 

a 

17 

it 

11 “ 

3 

it o 

u 

18 

it 

1 2 ! “ 

4 

“ 3 

i; 

19 

(( 

13 ; “ 

5 

“ 4 

it 

20 

Gal. 

1 “ 

6 

Col. 1 

tt 

2 1 

ii 

O | 11 

7 

“ 9 

it 

22 

U 

o tt 

o 

8 

“ 3 

it 

23 

it 

4 “ 

9 

“ 4 

u 

24 

It 

5 “ 

10 

1 Thoss. 1 

w 

25 

Ci 

0 “ 

1 1 

ii o 


26 

Eph. 

1 “ 

12 

“ 3 

u 

27 

it 

9 “ 

13 

“ 4 ; 

it 

28 

1 1 

3 

14 

“ 5 1 

u 

29 

U 

4 “ 

15 

2 Thess. 1 

— 


This table can be written oil a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 


At llome Again. 

I arrived safely at home on the 2'2nd of 
Mar. and rnetthe loved ones in good health. 
I was from home three months and 13 
days; during which time I visited hundreds 
of my brethren and sisters, and for the love 
and kindness they manifested towards me, I 
feed that I can not thank (hem enough; I 
only hope and pray that our kind heavenly 
Father will reward them. I trust, dear 
brethren and sisters, you will remember me 
in your prayers. No doubt, I have parted 
with many of you for the last time, aud our 
next meeting will be before the judgment- 
seat of Christ. Let us, therefore watch, and 
keep ourselves iu constant readiness. Let 
us labor while it is day, for the night com- 
eth when no man can labor. 

This I yet desire of my 1 friends, brethren 
and sisters, that if I have offended any one, by 
word or action, while with you, I hope you 
will manifest so much love towards me as to 
tell me of it, fur my own benefit, that I may 
beg your pardon. 1 am s"ure I did not in- 
tentionally offend ary one; but I am weak, 
and liable to err; and if you would be my 
friend, tell me of my faults. I desired 
nothing while with you but to do the Master’s 
will ; to labor for the promotion of his cause 
and kingdom. 

I feel th at it was good for me to be with 
you; as ] felt much encouraged and 
-.treiigthened by your words of love, and 
earnest admonitions; and r-liall, in my weak- 
ness, strive to do what many of you requested 
of me. 

1 feel especially thankful to those who so 
kindly assisted me, and conveyed mo from 
place to place, and fear l shall never bo able 
to reward you. Your acts of love will never 
be forgotteu. May lie from whom all 
blessings come, duly reward you according 
to his infinite mercy, is the prayer of your 

Brother Henry. 


We can sway and improve a man 
much better by appreciating him, 


l linding fault with him, and scolding 
and worrying him as if we hardly 
I thought the poor fellow fit to live. 


62 


HIEKyALD OiF 1 TBUTH. 




Scripture Facts. 

Tin; folfowing interesting sketch 
came,*to my notice, which I shall 
coj)y for the Herald of Truth. 
These curious facts about, the Bible 
were ascertained, it is said, by a 
convict sentenced to a long term of 
solitary confinement. ' 

“The Bible contains 3,586,489 let- 
ters, 773,692 words, 31,173 verses, 
1189 chapters, and 66 books. The 
word and, occurs 46,277 times. The 
word Lord occurs 1855 times. The 
word reverend occurs but once, 
which is in the 9th verse of the 111th 
Psalm. The middle verse is Ps. 
1 1 S : 8. The 21st verse of the 7th 
chapter of Ezra, contains all the let- 
ters in the alphabet, except the let- 
ter ,T. The finest chapter to read is 
the 26th chapter of the Acts ofthe 
apostles. The 19th of 2 Kings and 
the 37th chapter of Isaiah are alike. 
The longest verse is the 9th of the 
8th chapter of Esther. The short- 
est verse is the 35th verse of the 11th 
chap ter. of St. John. The 8th, 15th, 
and 31st verses of the 107tli Psalm 
are alike. Each verse of the 136th 
Psalm ends alike. There are no 
words or names of more than six 
syllables.” , x . * 



i The 19th of Dec.. 1871, in Hickory co., Mq., by 
Bishop Churls F. Kunze, Christian Roth, to Mag- 
dalina Reiss, both of the above place. 

The loth of Febr. 1872, at the same place, by 
1 lie name, John Esch , to Amanda Schmidt, both of 
j the satne / place. 

The 18tii of Febr., in Lagrange Co., Inti., by 
Joseph Miller, Ilenry Erb , of Waterloo eo., Cana- 
da West, to Judith Tcis , of Lagrange co., lnd., 

The 10th of March, in Columbiana, Ohio, by 
j E. II. Kurtz, John !J. Metzler, to Susanna Basing- 
i er, both of Mahoning co., Ohio. 

In union dear, these hearts unite, 

To praise the Maker that they love ; 

0 may they e’er in thee confide, 

That they may reach that land above. 

The 27 jh of Febr. in Kent co., Mich., Christina 
j Wenger to Lavina Nagel, both of the above men- 
| tioned place. 

The 22nd of Feb., in Rockingham co., Va., by 
W. A. l’rice, J . IF. M innick, to Elizabeth C. 
Coffman, both of the above mentioned place. 

The 7th of March, by J. M. Brenncman, Isaac 
Kohli , to Christina Shcnlc, both of Allen co., Ohio. 

The 21st of March, by the same, Abraham 
Bios ser, to France s Steiner, both of Putnam co., 
Ohio. 

The 24th of March, in Elkhart co., lnd., by 
I). Brenneman, Andrew Shcnlc , of Allen eo., Ohio, 
to Susan Good, of Elkhart co., Ind. 

The 17th of March, by J. W. Worthington, 
Samuel E. Hoover, of Wayne co., Ohio, to Catha- 
rine Steele, of Appanoose co., Iowa. May the 
Lord bless them with a long and happy life. 



A Very Sad Accident. 

A very sad accident occurred near 
this place on Monday the 26th of 
February. As Jacob Bauman, a 
minister of the United Brethren 
church, was changing a belt in a j 
sawmill, of which lie was part own- 1 
er, it caught his arm, broke it in sev- 
eral places and tore the iiesli in a 
shocking manner. He lived eight j 
days after the accident. He was [ 
over 39 years old. 

Another. — B y the explosion of i 
the boiler at a steam sawmill near 
this three men were instantly killed, 
and three more so badly scalded, 
that there is no hopes of their recov- 
ery; two others escaped unhurt. 

From this we can see the brittle- : 
ness of the thread of life, and that 1 
there is but a pare between life and 
death. 

These scenes, and many others ! 
should awaken the most, hardened 
sinner, to seek refuge in a crucilied 
Savior before it is forever too late. 

Lot us be earnest in our prayers 
for those who live so careless, hav- 
ing no hope, and without (tod in the 
world. 

111. NILS U V MAN. 

/ la in monel, Mi ch . 


P i e 0 , 

C y 


On the 1 si of Oct., 1871, in Hickory co.. Mo., 
of a fall from a horse, Barbara, only child of Ja- 
cob and Susanna Yoder, aged lOyrs., 3 mo., and 
12 days. FuneraVdisoourse by I’eter Lehman. 

On the 21st of November, 1871, in Hickory co., 
Mo., Maria, wife of John Wenger, in the 38th 
year of her age. 

On the Gth of Jan., in Hickory co., Mo., Jlen- 
r y Miller, aged about 40 years. Funeral dis- 
course by John Zimmerman, and Christian Zehr. 

■ ()n the 17th of Jan., in McLean co., 111., of 
nervous fever, Abraham Racier, aged 13 yrs., f> 
nios., and 15 days. He was buried the 18th. Fu- 
neral discourse by John Stably, and Clir. Kis- 
ser. 

' On the 13th of Febr., in Livingslou co., 111., 
Pre Jacob Waglcr, ofthe Amish church, aged 0-5 
yrs., and 10 months. He bore his suffering with 
Christian patience. Three weeks before his 
death, his wife was so sick that she was not ex- 
pected to live ; at this he was very much grieved, 
and frequently expressed a. desire to go hi st, say- 
ing that he was ready, and hud a desire to be 
with Jesus. After an illness of nine days he 
went to his Savior, who will wipe all tears fr< in 
his eyes, “ Blessed are the dead which die in 
the Lord.’’ lie was buried the 15th, in the pres- 
ence of many friends and acquaintances. Servi- 
ces by Clir. Schloegel, and John P. Schmidt. 

On ti e 23vd of Febr., in Cass co., Mo., after a 
lingering illness of 18 months, John ll. Kenagg, 
aged 55 yrs., 3 inns., and 7 days. He leaves u 
wife and 7 children to mourn their loss. Mor- 
mon by J. C. Kenngy, 

On the 24th of Febr., in Lagrange co , lnd , of 

inflammation ofthe brain, dost, wife ofSam- 

uel dost, aged 30 vrs., 7 mo., and 8 days, Bu- 






i 


i 


I 


ried the 26tb. Services by David Hertzler, and 
Elias Schrock, from Rev. 14: 12, 13. 

On the 27th of Febr., in Wayne co., Ohio, of 
kidney consumption, John R. Stauffer, formerly 
of Lancaster co., Pa., aged 63 yrs., and 1 month. 
Funeral Services by Benjamin ITorst, and Daniel 
Brenneman. from Jn. 4: 24 — 29. 

On the 27th of Febr., at Millerstown, Perry co.. 
Pa., Louisa I. wife of Isaac N. Rinehart , aged 33 
yrs., 5 mos., and 10 days. She leaves a bereav. 
ed husband and 2 children t-o mourn their loss. 

On the 28th of Feb., near Tiffin, Seneca co 
Ohio, of inflammation of the brain, William Myron 
son of J. W. and D. Adelsperger, and ouly grand- 
son of the writer, aged 1 yr., 3 mos., and 10 
days. Funeral discourse by J. C. Oclc. 

Weep not for me my parents dear, 

Butthink that 1 am blessed ; 

I’ve no more pain nor death to fear, 

My soul is now at rest. A. A. Good. 

On the 12tli of March, in Howard co., Ind., of 
lung fever, Simeon T. Kcmlal , aged 22yrs. , 9 mos . 
and 2 days. Sermon by Daniel S. Miller. 

On the 1st of March, in Mahoning co., Ohio. 
Mary Detwciler , aged 49 yrs., 2 mos., and 17 
days. She enjoyed her usual health until the 
day before her death. When she felt that the 
dying hour was near, she desired to be united 
with the people of God, which was granted, and 
we hope she is now at rest from all her toil. 
Her remains were interred in Overholtzer’s bu- 
rying-ground. Funeral discourse by Jacob Culp 
in German, and by Joseph Bixler in English, 
f.-om Jn. 5 : 24—30. 

Thus, I bid you all adieu, 

Mourning friends, () do not grieve ; 

Yet nty years have been but few*, 

1 this world with comfort leave. A. 

tin the 4th of March, at the residence of her 
son-in-law, Christian Gerber, in Woodford co., 
111., of Ihe infirmities of age, Mafia Dcllenlach, 
aged 97 yrs., 7 mos., and 1 day. Her mortal re- 
mains were interred the Gth, in the presence of 
many friends and acquaintances. Sermon by 
Christian Escb, and Peter Gingerich. Her 
intellect remained until the end. She was a 
faithful sister in the Ornish Church for 80 years, 
and a widow 30 j’earg. She was born in France, 
and came to America about 30 years ago. 

On the 11 of March, near Hagerstown, Wash- 
ington co., Md , of Pneumonia, at the residence 
of her grand-father, Jac< b Summer, Martha Ann, 
daughter of William W„ and Lydia A. Wolf, 
aged 6 yrs., 1 mo., and 1 day. Sermon by Daniel 
Roth , from Lukel8: 1G,17. She was loved by all 
who kuew her. “The Lord gave, and the Lord 
hath taken away ; blessed be the name of the 
Lord.” 

“ Dearest daughter thou hast left us, 

Here thy loss we deeply feel, 

But. ’t is God that hath bereft us, 

He can all our sorrows heal. 

Yet again we hope to meet thee, 

When the day of life is fled, 

Then in heaven with joy to greet thee. 

Where no farewell tear is shed.” 

W. W. Wolf. 

On the 7th of March, in Columbiana co., Ohio, 
Bro, Henry Kindly , aged 90 yrs., and 0 days. 
Sermon by Samuel Wagner, and Daniel Brenne- 
tnan, l'rotn Job 19: 25. 

On the 3th of March, in Chambersburg, Co- 
lumbiana co. , Ohio, Conrad Shape, aged about 51 

years. Service by Zigler, ami Daniel 

BrenDf man, from 1st Chron. 29: 15. 

On the 17th of March, in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
consumption, Mary S. Swisher, aged 34 yrs., 9 
mos., and 19 days. A.lso at the same time and 
place, Cora Rodilla. daughter of Henry nr.d Sa- 
lat h Fletcher, aged 8 mos., and 4 days. Buried 

near Wakartisa, Services by Reed, and I* 

Rrenuenmn from Job 14: 10. 

On the 17th of March, in Elkhart eo., Ind., of 


HERALD OH 1 TRUTH. 


consumption, John IF. Culp, aged 23 yrs., 5 mos., 
and 5 days. He was buried on the 19th at Yel- 
low Creek, where a funeral disourse was delivered 
by Daniel Breaneinan. His health began to de- 
cline some months ago, but ho still hoped that 
be might be restored. Fiually, however as the 
fatal disease became more deep seated, he gave 
up all hopes of recovery and sought to make 
peace with his God, and desired to be baptized, 
and received into the church, which was accord- 
ingly done. During his sickness, he appeared 
patient and hopeful, having a strong confidence 
in God. When asked, If it were left to your 
choice, whether to be 'restored to health, or to 
die, which would j*ou choose? he unhesitating- 
ly replied, That he would rather go and live 
with Jesus. On the day of his death be sat up 
iu his chair anr/ took dinner with the family, but 
eoon after, being very weak, he was taken to his 
bed, and feeling that death was near, he stretch- 
ed forth his hand and bade farewell to one aft- 
er another, as long as he could lift his hand, 
ilis mother being called to him, he also gave her 
good-bye, when she said to him, “Put your trust 
in God.” He simply nodded assent and with a 
sweet smile passed from earth away. He very 
often desired to have the hymn sung, 

“ Why should we start and fear to die ? 

What tim’rous worms we mortals are ! 
Death is the gate to endless joy, 

And yet we dread to enter there.” 

Brothers, sisters, friends, shall we not all try 
to meet Bro. John in the realms of light and joy 
above ? 

On the 2nd of April, 1871. in Meehanicsburg, 
Cumberland co., Pa., David Coble , aged 75 yrs., 
and 5 months; and on the 1 4th of Febr., 1872, 
Anna Coble, aged 04 yrs., 5 mos., and 20 days. 
They were faithful members of the Mennonite 
Church for many years, lived a Christian life, 
and were kind atid affectionate parents. May 
we all strive to meet them in that bright world 
where parting shall be no more. 

“ Dearest parents, you have left us, 

Here your loss we deeply feel ; 

But ’tis God that has bereft us. 

He can all our sorrows heeal.” 

Bark ak a Stovitkb. 

On the 24th of Febr., very suddenly*, in Kent 
co., Mich., Pre. Benjamin Bauman, aged over 01 
years. He said he felt unwell, and lay on the 
bed; shortly after some person came in to see 
him ; his wife went in the room to tell him, and 
he was already a corpse. Thus in life we are in 
death. 

On the 10th of March, in Somerset co., l’a,, 
Catharine, wife of Isaac Thomas, aged 31 years. 
She leaves a husband and 9 children to mourn 
their loss. She was unfaithful member of the 
Omish Church, and beloved by all who knew her. 
Services by M. C. Miller, ami John Hershber- 
ger. 

On the 5th of March, in Cashtown, Adams co., 
l’a., Bro. Isaac Rife, in the 70th year of his ngc. 
He was much respected by all who knew him. 
Services by D. Shank. 

On the 10th of March, in Marshall eo., Ind., of 
spasms, a son of Jacob Irani- , aged 9 yrs., and 5 
months. j. D. T. 

On the lltli of March, iu Juniata co., Pa., of 
the infirmities of age, Bro. Adam Page, aged 74 
years. He was a member of the Mcnuonile 
Church over 40 years. Services in the German 
by S. Garman, and in the English, by Win, Gra- 
Dill, from the words, “ In the world ye shall have 
tribulation; but be of good cheer ; l have over- 
come the world,” Jn. 10; 33. 

On the 18th of March, in Elkhart co.. Did., of 
rheumatism, Mary J., daughter of Jonathan and 
Rebecca Ntutzman, aged 7 yrs.. 10 mos., and 7 
'•ays. Services in german by E. Hostetler, and 
*•’> the english by Christian S. Plank. 

On the 20th of March, iu St. Joseph 
county, Indiana, of consumption, T id 


Longcnecker , aged 28 yrs., 2 mos., and 5 days. 
He lingered some 4 years, and bore his afflictions 
with patience. Three days previous to his death 
he according to his request was baptized and 
received as a brother in the church. He gave a 
blessed evidence of having peace with God desir- 
ing to depart and be with Jesus, rather than re- 
main in this vale of tears. We trust it is well 
with him. Funeral discourse by John F. Funk, 
and Daniel Brenneman. An aged father, broth- 
ers, sisters, an.l many friends, followed his re 
mains to the grave. 

On the 2nd of Febr.’, in Snyder co., I’a., Bro. 
Tobias Grabill , aged 45 yrs., 11 mos., and 9 days. 
He was a faithful member in the church, and his 
seat in the house of God was seldom vacant. He 
was buried in Grabill’s burying-ground. Funer- 
al discourse by Jacob Grabill, and Samuel Win- 
cy, from Jn. 16 : 33. 

On the 8tli of March, in Spring Garden, Lan- 
caster co., Pa., Sister Anna Nissley, aged 80 yrs., 
11 mos., and 16 days. She was buried on the 
11th at Graybill’s Meeting-house, where a large 
concourse of relatives and friends had assembled. 
Funeral discourses were delivered by Henry 
Shenk, and John B. Landis, in the Germau lan- 
guage, and by Jacob N. Brubaker, in the Eng- 
lish, from Ps. 31: 0. The writer visited the aged 
sister four days before her death. She was still 
able to sit up in her chair. She loved to con- 
verse about the love and mercy of God, and her 
Savior, and expressed her hope of being accept- 
ed of God, through Jesus. She expressed her 
desire to depart and be at rest. She said she 
had been a member of the Mennonite Church, 
over 05 years. Her life was one of trouble and 
sorrow ; but she stood firm to the end, in the 
service of her Master. II. B. B. 

On the 14th of March, at the residence of his 
son-in-law, in Menno Township, Mifflin co., Pa., 
of typhoid fever, Jonathan Peachey, aged about 
72 years. He was a member of the Amish 
Church. 

On the 14th of March in Mifflin co., I’a., while 
on a visit to his friends, Christian Yoder sr., of 
Champaign co., Ohio. Aged 72 yrs., llmos., 
and 18 days. Ilis remains were buried on the 
17th in the Amish Mennonite burying-ground in 
Champaign co., Ohio. Funeral discourses were 
delivered by the brethren, Christian and John 
Werrey. A large concourse of friends and 
neighbors being present to pay the last tribute 
of respect to our dear old brother. 

ftcttcre D.ecftbctr. 


Christian Welty, J L M, J C Kcnag.v, F 1), Jos 
Kornhass, II N K, G Z Boiler, Chr Herr, Jacob, 
lloldemun, Moses E Heist, Jus Martin, Chr II 
Shelly, 8 Schrock, M W Shenk, A M Kaufman 
J M Miller, J M Hess, Jacob Hildebrand, P 
Sch unit z, J F Krout, Elizabeth A Sommer, Sam- 
uel Kiehl, John Yeider, C It Buckwalter, L J 
Miller, Benj Eicher, John Diller, 1 C Lehman, 
Win ti Moyer, Samuel S Good, D A Jfeatwole, 
Daniel Brubaker, Joseph Kornhnus, S K Bare, 
R N Knit/., C von der Smissen, Christian Kilmer, 
Margaret Kilmer, J E Springer, J D Troyer, Ja- 
cob Richl, Henry Neiss, Elizabeth Mtisselman. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — Jacob K Andrews tjil ; John U Ainstufz 
70 ; Jacob K Andrews 50cts ; Noah Augsburger 
5Ucts : Jacob II Augspurger !}>1 30. 

i; — John Baer $1 ; Gabriel Bear lor Susan 
Sutiun.v 17cts ; Christian Birkenhach Tools : Jost 
Bully 70cls : Abin Bowman $1 ; Benjamin Barr 
ifc 1 25 : Samuel lllougli S 1 50 ; Non Bechtel $14 ; 
Christian Beck .'fil : Jos B Bechtel $3: ('hr Bren* 
ncman $3 20; John Birki .'fi l 10 : G Breiten- 
bircher -$2 50 ; A Breckbill loots ; Andrew 
Berkcy $2 ; Chr Beckler $0 50 ; John K Bare 
$1 25 ; Moms Bowman $1 ; Jacob Beery $1 ; 1 


John W Beery $1 : Samuel Buckwalter $1 ; Jos 
J Borntrcger $1 25 ; Noah Byler 60cts ; Joseph 
Barke.v $1 50 ; Chr Brenneman $5 ; Magdalena 
Beery lOcts ; Christian Beiler S2 ; Samuel 
Peachy 35cts ; Josiah Brener $5 75 ; Barbara 
Burkholder 30cts; Menno Bowman if»4 25; Phebe 
Beidler lOcts ; Joseph Birky $1. 

C — Henry B Cassel Si 50; Jos Crawford $2 
65 ; Leanna Carpenter $1. 

D — II Dougherty Si 25 ; Jos Detwciler $2 50. 

E — Chr Eschleman 30cts ; M C Ebcrly $3 ; 
Henry Erb 20cts ; John Engel $2 ; M D Fasch 
$1 6Q ; Mrs M A Esiileman $3 25. 

F — Rachie Fretz lOcts ; Wm Folgate $2 ; 
Elizabeth Fry Si. 

G — Sami Gueugrich $1 63 ; John Gascho $2 
10 ; Ernst Gtirno Si ; C Goldsmith $1 ; Lorenzo 
D Good 30cts ; Joseph Graver $1 ; John Good 
$2 ; D D Geiger lOcts : Samuel S Garber S2 it 
is all right ; Jos G Good $1 50 ; J S Good 50cts ; 
Samuel Good $1 10 ; Joseph Gotwals $1 50 ; Chr 
Gerber $1 ; David Gehman §2 45. 

II — Jacob W Horst S3 ; John II Hess Si ; 
Wm Ilembling Si ; J H Hochstctler Si ; Henry 
Huber $0 50 ; Jacob Hoover $5 25 ; Chr L Iler- 
shey SO ; Jos Hertzler $6 ; Detrick Hoover $5 

50 ; N Hummel 25cts ; Jos Hertzler Si 50 ; Leon 
ard Hoover .fil 50 : Mary Huber $1 send your 
P O address ; John Ilaga .$1 ; Martin Ilerr S3 ; 
Leonard Hoover $1 40 : J C Harrington $1 50 ; 
S G Hager 75cfs ; S S Hnrtzler lOcts ; Chr Hertz- 
ler $2 ; Henry Hartman S3 25 ; Jacob Huvcr 

51 ; Martin Hershey $1 60 ; Elizabeth Hoch- 
stetter SI 50 ; John R Hess .$‘1 60 ; S B Hostet- 
ter Si 80 ; Jos Ilcatwole $5. 

J — Win Johnson 50ct3 ; N Johnson $2 ; Sam 
uel Jerley SI 40. 

K — A M Kauffman $2 ; Jacob Kauffman SI 
50 ; John F King .$1 50 ; N II King $2 50 ; Bar- 
bara Krabehl Si ; Martha King $2 10 ; Chr 
Kauffman SO 40 ; John P King $1 50 ; Sheru 
King 20cts ; John Kennel $1 ; D W Kilmer $1 
70 ; N II King lOcts. 

L — David E Landis Si 00 ; J D Lefever $1 
00 ; B W Landis SI 50 ; Jos B Lichty $2 25 ; 
E Landi tSl 50. 

M — James McCann 35cfs ; Joseph Miller Si ; 
Levi J Miller lOcts ; Jacob Metz S3 ; John Miller 
farmer .$'1 ; Christian Metzler Si 50 ; Samuel I 
Moyer $5 ; Thomas Morrow $5 ; J A Mast $5 
50 ; B 'L Moyer $1 : Angelina Moyer lOcts ; J 
B McConnel SI ; Philip Mosemun $3 ; John M 
Mast Si 50. 

N — Jos Nafziger Si 50 ; Jos K Newcomer $1 ; 
D Neuschwanger $1 ; J P Nafziger 25cts ; J F 
Nafziger $3. 

O — John Oesch $3 15 ; Amos Overholt $1 . 

P — Miss N M Port 25cts. 

R — Samuel D Ream Si : Chr Ktipp $1 ; Anron 
E lleist Si 60 ; Jos Roth SI ; Nicholas Roth .ftl ; 
Jacob E Ruth Si 50 ; Daniel Rudy S2 10 ; Chr 
Richetier 12cts ; J W Risser Si 50 ; Moiies E 
Heist S! 1)5 ; Jacob Rupp SI ; Noah Reesor $1 ; 
Lewis Ridenour .$*1 : Joseph Ruth $2 50. 

8 — Jacob Slterk SI 10 ; Jos Scliertz .$1 05 : 
O D Short S‘_‘ ; S L Sloltzfus $1 50 ; Frederick 
Stauffer S3 ; Peter E Stuckey S2 60 ; Abm A 
Sehantz $2 10 ; John P Schmitt $3 20 ; Chris- 
tian Strnhin SI : .1 Schott lOcts ; Abm Schank 
$2 ; J P Stoll #1 60 ; .1 E Springer $5 ; Mary 
Salzmun -Si 3 25 ; Elizabeth Stauffer $2 ; H J 
Shellenberger .$*1 40 : J SStutzmun $<2 60 ; Hen- 
ry Shauk SI 30 ; Fred Schoetler $1 70 : O R 


ry Shauk SI 30 ; Fred Schoetler $1 70 : O R 
Stuckey $5 25 ; John Steinman $1 ; Joseph 
Slutzman .'ftl ; If A Stolzfus SI 50 ; Joseph 
Scluneck 2()ets ; Peter Stauffer 3|)cts , Ilenry 
Slioutz Si. 

T — Michael Troyer Si': l* J Trover 36c t? 
Jacob F T voxel sf. 

Y — James Vaucyoc 40c 

W — Win 'V Wolf Si ; Samuel P Weaver SI , 
Manin S Weaver Si : Chr Widenntn $1 ; Jus 
Wiedrich $1 ; Jolm Wittmer lOcts; EC Wea- 
ver S3 : Abm Winner >i 50; Isaac W Weber 

$3 15. 


j ; John Steinman $1 ; 
H A Stolzfus SI 50 ; 

; Peter Stauffer 30ots , 

Trover .'•1 I* J Trover 
1 " | 


64 


H FI T?/ A T ,~D O? TRUTH. 


^Pri! 


Y — Elizabeth Yoder $t ; Jonathan C Yoder 
$1 ; DM Yoder lOots : Solomon Yoder .$‘3 ; J S 
Yoder $2 ; Samuel Yoder $‘3 40. 

Z — J Zimmerman 85cts ; Shem Zook $1 60 ; 
John Y Ziegler $6 30 ; David M Zook $1 50 ; 
John Zook $1. 

For Hooks. — Christian Nafziger $14 35: De- 
vid King $18 03; Mich Ilemersberger $12 ; 
John V Gunden $37. 


TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passanger trains on and after Jan. 1 4th, 1S72, 
leave Elkhart as follows: 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) 11 ,20, a. m. 
Special New York Expr., (Main Line) 1,10, “ “ 
Atlantic Express, (Air Line) 9,55, p. m. 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 1,10 a. m. 

Grand Rapids, 4,30 p. m. 

GOING WEST. 

Special Chicago Express (Main Line,) 4,35 p. m. 
Night Express, (Main Line) 2,40 A. M. 

Pacific Express, (Air Line,) 4,00 a. m. 

Accommodation 4,45 r. m.' 

Trains for Detroit for the Great Western Rail- 
way leave Elkhart as follows : 

Express, 1,10, p. m. 

Night-Express, 1.10, a. m. 

All trains run on Cleveland time which 
is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time. 
g&Y” Sleeping cars on all night trains. 

Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. 

C. F. Hatch, Gon. Supt. 

S. D. Bancroft, Agent, Elkhart. 


60 

$6 00 
5 00 


Books for sale at this office- 

The following books arc sent by mail, postage 
prepaid. 

The English Mennonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery, 
at the following price: 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid 
Per dozen, “ 

■* “ sent by express at purchasers’ 

expense - 
Pocket edition, - - - * 75 

The German Spelling Book, a work of 160 
pages, adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those who wish to study the Gertinnr language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. ... 25 

f*er dozen, by express at purchasers’ ex- 
pense - - - - ■ $2 5(i 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 
on application. 

Wk have yet a small number of the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for 75 cents. 

Aniiineiime Stunuen in Zion. The little Book. 
“ Angenelime St widen in '/ion.” written by Ulrich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again lie obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 
p g r t »n gl» cop y , postage prepai d, - $0 10 

dozen, “ “ * * 1 00 

“ hundred, by express, at purchasers’ 

expense, - - - - - - 7 50 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
angnag, worthy of being read by all 


German Catechism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our office, 
at the following prices: 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ 0 10 
Per dozen, “ '* “ 1 00 

“ hundred, by express, - 7 50 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. Walker, D. D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Pi ice, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of Pride and Humility, Eng. 
and Ger. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 

Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen 75 cts. 


English Mennonite Hymn Book, 
Conversation on Saving Faith, 1 
(Confession of Faith.) English \ 
“ “ German 

English-German Testaments 
German Bibles, small size 
English Bibles “ “ 

German Testaments, small size 


$ .60 

.75 

.60 
.75 
1.00 
1.00 
.20 

large size, with clasps 1.50 
“ “ with notes 2.00 

English Testaments, small size .15 to .50 

“ “ large bize .40 to .60 

Dymond on War .50 

Should Christians Fight? .10 

Peace Manual .50 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2 2 I 

“ “ “ German, 1.66 

American Tract Primer, Eng. or Ger. .40 

German and English Primer .45 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. .25 

Bible Text. Book .45 

Bible Reader’s Help .40 

Aim’s German Grammar 1.25 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklterung 1.60 

Oehlschlagers Eng & Ger Dictionary, 1 70 

Adlers “ “ “ 2 80 

Adlers large “ “ “ by express 7 00 


Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 


1 75 


Websters Dictionaries, 75, 90, 120, 1 45x2 50 
Habermans German Prayer Book 30 

“ English “ “ 30 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 3 00 

“ “ “ German 4 00 

En lish Testaments with notes 1 10 

“ “ “ PsulniB 1 40 

German “ “ “ 1 10 

Dictionary ot the Bible, by express 5 00 

“ “ “ Illustrated 1 85 

Pilgrims Progress, English or German 75 

History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 65 

Iluebners Bible History, English 1 75 

Fleei woods Life of Christ 3 75 

Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 1 50 

Vlenno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 2.25 

Unparteiisches Gesangbuch, with clasps 1.60 

Gemeinschaftliohe Lieder-Sammlung 

(meimonilisches Licderbuch) .60 

Uuparteiisclie Licder-Sanuu. jng 

(amisches Liederbuch) .60 

Spiegel der Taufe (Ger.) .40 


65 


Ernsthafte Christenpflicht 
Johann Arnd’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arnd’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradies Gsertlein, &c. 3.60 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 26 

Bibles, 1 00, 2 00, 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 

per volume by express 

Health, or how to live 
Brown’s Pocket Concordance 
Mind and Words of Jesus 
Morning and Night Watches 
The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or Ggrman, by express 3.75 

For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each year bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.C5 
The three years together in one volume, 
by express $3.50, by mail $4.00. 


4.00 

1.25 

60 

60 

60 


MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 
Funk’s sons. 

Price per single copy. Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

“ “ “ # “ prepaid 14.50 

THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush and Kieffer. 

Price per single copy, postage prepaid, $0.60 
“ “ doz. 6.00 

THE CHRISTIAN IIARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 35 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Music. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, $2.75. 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnson’s system for 
learning to read music is unsurpassedby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $12. 

Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, we will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices" 


of S 



A Religious Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK &. Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $1,00 a year in 
either language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Persons subscribing should be particular 
state whether they wisft the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies sent free. 
Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

Klkliart Ind. 


Mennonite Book Store, Book an l Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 



A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY JOURNAL. 


“ How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace. 


Vol. 9 -No. 5. 


ELKHART, INDIANA, MAY 1872. 


Whole No. 101 


“ I Am the Lord’s”. 


BY S. M. II. 

I am learning of the Master ; 

I give myself to him, 

That he may dwell within me. 

And cleanse mo from all sin. 

I know I am unworthy, 

But Jesus died for all ; 

I’m weak, but he is mighty, 

He will not let me fall. 

I’m trusting in the master, 

And learning every day 

To cast on him my burdens, 

To him commit my way; 

1 trust his gracious promise, 

I know he cares for me, 

And while his hand I’m clasping, 

No evil shall I see. 

I’m looking to the Master, 

And resting in his love ; 

Peace in my heart is ruling, 

His blessing from above. 

Though many times I’ve grieved him, 
He freely all forgave ; 

I’ll trust him for the future 

From sin and death to save. 


Translated from the “OemeindeblttM." 

Origin of the Mennonite Church; and 
the Life of Menno. 

To many members of the Mennonite 
Church, its origin is not so clear ; even so 
with the person of Menno Simon, after whom 
it was named. Many know no more of ei- 
ther of them than they have heard at ca- 
nonical reform celebrations from the prot- 
cstant clergy, who mostly present the case 
in an erroneous way, as though Menno had 
been one of the Munsterite anabaptists, and 
we, the followers of a riotous, fanatical, and 
horrible sect. For lack of information on 
the subject, when such members of our 
church enter into conversation with those of 
other churches about this, they refer them 
to the errors of Munster, and they general- 
ly wet into difficulty, because they know 
not 'flow the matter stands. 

I have frequently been solicited to write 
the life of Menno, and the origin of the 
church, in the “ Gemeindcblatt. ’ Estcem- 
iug it profitable and good, in compliance 
with that request, I have resolved to do so 
in as brief and simple a manner as possible. 

In the year 1848, minister llooscn, of 

T T 1 U1 i L « 1 1 (a Ai OTi no in o 


book worthy of recommendation, and also in 
the “ Mennonitischen Blaette^n,” in the 
years 1855 — 1857; as but a small number 
of the readers of the “Gemeindcblatt," have 
read the “ Mennonitischen Blaetter,” and 
still a smaller number have read the book, 
aud as the history of the anabaptists (Meu- 
nonites), by Bro. DcVeer, which was an- 
nounced in the “ Mennonitischen Blaetter," 
No. 4, of the past year, will soon appear, 
this may not seem superfluous as many of 
the readers of this sheet may not be favor- 
ed with the book. 1 request the intelligent 
readers of this paper to attribute to my im- 
perfections, any errors which they may 
herein find. 

In writing the history of the origin of 
the church, 1 will not commemee with the 
time of Menno, but with the first Christian 
Fentdcost, to show that from the time of the 
original church, in every century, uutil now, 
churches have existed, even if under differ- 
ent names, that maintained as their main 
principles the same as ours, namely : To 
baptize none but believers, and to maintaiu 
church discipline as well as to observe tru- 
ly all other ordinances of the Lord and of 
the apostles; and that such churehes did 
not originate since the time of Menno only. 

A church historian also says. “Even from 
the earliest period, there were Christians 1 
(namely, Novatians), who entertained the 
views of the true church, and re-asserted 

them. *) > ___ 

y 1 

After the Lord, through the out-pouring 

of.the Holy Ghost, had founded his church 
at Jerusalem, and after the death of Ste- 
phen by" the great persecution which was 
raised against the believers, whereby they 
were scattered throughout the land of Ju- 
dea and Samaria, they went about and 
preached the gospel, the Christian churches 
increased rapidly amidst all the persccu- j 
lions by the Jews and Gentiles, to whom 
they preached; and all who gladly received 
the word, and believed, were baptized and 
received into the church, where they were 
then further instructed, to obserye all 
things whatsoever the Lord Jesus had 
commanded them. 

Afterwards such persons as made applica- 
tion to be received into the church, were 
particularly instructed for a time, and pro- 

*) Origin of “ Church History,’’ published by 
the Christian Union, in the north of Germany. | 


pared for baptism ; but no where can wc 
find, either in the New Testament, or in the 
history of the primitive churches, that in- 
fants were baptized. But notwithstanding 
the terrible persecution, Christianity extend- 
ed itself in the commencement of the fourth 
century. Long before the Emperor Constan- 
tine was converted to Christianity, and be- 
came a protector thereof, the spiritual life, 
and the apostolic church discipline was more 
aud more obscured, and corruption in- 
creased in the churches ; therefore many of 
the most earnest Christians separated from 
the great body, and formed living church- 
es. The first of these Christians were called 
Novatians, from a Roman Presbyter, named 
Novatian, who flourished in the early part 
of the third centuay. and was a very earnest, 
pious man. The principal features of this 
church were : That no infants, but believers 
alone should be baptized, and to exercise 
a rigid, church discipline. 

The account by the church historians Soc- 
rates (not the heathen), and Zosiwus show, 
that in the fourth and fifth centuries there 
were many Novatian churches in most parts 
of the world. From the combined testimo- 
ny of history it is inferred, that the differ- 
ence between them and other churches con- 
sisted in this: that they required devoutuess, 
and becoming purity of the members of a 
Christian church ; and that they exercised 
a rigorous, church discipline. 

The Donatists originated iu Africa, in. 
the year 311, and spread in all the provin- 
ces. They received the name of Donatists, 
from Donatus. their first bishop. They re- 
sembled the Novatians in doctrine and 
church regulations. In their church disci- 
pline thev even surpassed them, as they re- 
instated the repentant offenders, and therein 
they were more conformable to the word 
than the Novatians, who would never re- 
ceive excommunicated members who had 
stained themselves with disgraceful sins. 
In the year 41 1. there met iu Synod at Car- 
thage, two hundred and eighty-six Catho- 
lic, aud two hundred ami seventy-nine Do- 
uatist bishops. Although sorely oppressed, 
and often severely persecuted, there was 
scarcely a town or district in Africa in 
which the Donatists, did not have church- 
es established. 

The Donatists were accused by church his- 
torians, of having polluted themselves with 
heinous sins ; and that as the Emperor Con- 



fuff-A-Fid of truth. 




stantiue designed to unite them with the to be fellow-pilgrims with their brethren, parts of the Netherlands, were filled with a 
church by force, they resisted unto life and And on the other hand they distinguished knowledge of them. 

death; they destroyed the lands, fired their themselves by their strict morals, knowl- In the year 1405, Pope 1 rban instituted 
houses, and robbed and murdered travelers, edge, zeal, and the unction of the Holy a great meeting in the open field, in which 
In the Martyr’s Mirror, Part First, page 1 33, Spirit. They made no effort to accumulate resolutions, to banish and destroy the Le- 
the following very correct remark, about earthly treasures. They advised all men to rengarians, and their doctrine, were passed. 
Donatos, is made: “With regard to this read the gospel, which the priests forbade As a result of this, they became subject to \er^ 

Donatus, wherein he erred, or went astray the common people to do. One of the severe persecutions, and their necessities bo- 

concerning the faith, this much is certain : preachers, whose name was Sergnis , who came very great. 1* irst they were banished 

since his own writings are wanting, all our had been induced to read the letters of out of the Homan dominions, and afterwards 

information respecting him and his doctriue, Paul, by theearnestsolicitfttionsof a Paulician condemned to die by tire and sword, princi- 
romes to us through his enemies.” Here woman, and was converted thereby, labored pally for the reason that they would not 
follows the opinion of a writer, who appears for the Lord forty years. He says, “From accept the baptism of infants, but taught 
to regret that he had written anything det- east to west, and from north to south, I have that believers only should be baptized ; ant! 
rimental to the Donatists, and says, “That preached the glad tidings of salvation, and also because they denied that the bread and 
the followers of Ikmatus were similar to the on my knees have I labored. ” The perse- wine in the communion was literally changed 
anabaptists ( baptists); that they taught to cutions whicji these Paulicians were compell- unto the real body and blood of Christ, 
constrain no man to do good or to embrace ed to endure from the church, through the In the year 1110 Peter deBruys, preach - 
the faith ; that heretics should be left unre- power of the law, were truly terrible. 'I he ed the pure doctrines of the gospel ol ( hrist. 
strained and unmolested in the enjoyment Bmpress Theodora alone, it is said, during in the southern provinces of h ranee. His 

of their own belief. Further that it is the short time of her reign took, by the labors were, in the course of twenty years, 

highly probable that these people have sword, the gallows, and the stake, the lives crowned with a glorious reward, until in the 
been charged with many groundless accusa- of one hundred thousand Paulicians. City of St. Giles, he was burned at the 

tions. It is greatly to be wished that we About the year 750, they were called the stake. 1 1 is followers were called Petrobrus- 

could have access to their own writings, Paterines (Sufferers or Martyrs), which in sians. In regard to their doctrines, history 

doctiines, and deeds. If it is a fact, that the eastern and southern parts of Europe, has preserved for our benefit, the following : 
they agreed in all respects with the Baptists separated themselves from the Catholic Baptism should only be administered to bo- 
(anabaptists), and were opposed to con- Church, and would not baptize children, hovers. To build churches and consecrate 

straint, in matters of faith, then it is mani- “A child,” said they, “lias no desire to be them to the Lord, is a vain superstition, a' 

fest that they were unjustly accused of tyr- baptized, and is unable to make a confes- the Lord only looks upon the condition of the 
anny by other historians.” sion of faith. The willingness, and the heart of his people, and had no regard for 

The Martyr’s Mirror informs us of this confession of another cannot do the child any temples made with hands ; bread and wine 

time (the fifth century), how many chris- good.” With their walk as Christians, their in the communion of the Lord’s Supper, arc 
tians, on account of scriptural baptism, were bitterest enemies could not find the least symbols of the body and blood of Christ, 
caused to be put to death, often by horrible fault. Their churches were systematically In Flanders several were caught and a* 
torture, by the so called Christian emperors, organized, and bad again united into large cused of having rejected the baptism of th* 1 
Honorius and Theodosius. bodies. Their bishops or leaders were Catholics, to which they replied, “The will. 

A decree of an emperor of that time reads mostly mechanics, and followed their trades, faith, and confession ofa child cannot be looked 
tints: “ If any of the ministers of the chris- by which they supported themselves. In upon in any other light than that they are 
tiau church shall be reported or found, who the year 1040, they were still numerous in a foreign will (a will not ones own), a lor 
has re baptized any oue, be with the one Mayland, where they had been chiefly es- eign faith, aud a foreign confession, for the 
re-baptized, if he has been otherwise Con- tablished. In the course of time, however child wants nothing (wills nothing), know-, 
vinced, and has age to understand the bias- many of them settled as colonists in nearly nothing of faith, nor does it understand any 
phemy, shall be punished with death.” all the various parts of Europe, from whence thing about its salvation; canuot cherish 


anabaptists (baptists); that they taught to 
constrain no man to do good or to embrace 
the faith ; that heretics should be left unre- 
strained and unmolested in the enjoyment 
of their own belief. Further that it is 
highly probable that these people have 
been charged with many groundless accusa- 
tions. It is greatly to be wished that we 
could have access to their own writings, 
doctiines, and deeds. If it is a fact, that 
they agreed in all respects with the Baptists 
(anabaptists), and were opposed to con- 
straint, in matters of faith, then it is mani- 


sverc like a desire, to be born again, neither can it 
make any acknowledgement or confession- 
ibishup of A few years after the death of Peter dc- 
lowu dead Bruys, another witness of the truth appear 
preaching ! ed in the person of Henry von Toulouse, 
who may he considered as a disciple and fol- 


This and similar decrees prove that there also Christian churches which were like a desire, to be born again, neither can it 
were Christians at that time who were call- them originated. * make any acknowledgement or confession, 

ed anabaptists, and because they did not Xu 1 1 7G, it is said that the archbishop of A few years after the death of Peter de- 
hold to the prevailing church, uor receive Mayland, an aged man. sank down dead Bruys, another witness of the truth appear 
its baptism, but exercised scriptural hap- while earnestly engaged in preaching ed in the person of Henry von Touiousc, 
tism, they were vehemently persecuted and against them. who may he considered as a disciple aud fcl- 

put to death. About the middle of the twelfth century, lower of the former. Both had previously 

The Paulicians originated about the mid- the church of the Berengarians took its been Monks, and educated persons. The 
die of the seventh century, but afterwards rise, so called from Berengarius, a Iiomish earnest and zealous labors of the latter in 
they extended themselves in an extraordi- Priest in France, who occupied a high posi- the service of the Lord, in the town of Lau- 
nary manner. They became very numerous, tiou in the Catholic Church, hut being con- same, Switzerland, in Mans, Poitiers, 
especially in Asia Minor, Thrace, Bulgaria, vinced of the truth, he became an active Bordeaux, and other cities in France, hut 
Italy, and France, where they subsequently contender against the pope and the errone- especially in Toulouse, were crowned with 
appeared as the Albigcnses. These chris- ous doctrines of the church. The Lord the most glorious results. 1 1 is fellow he 
tians, which were so much of the same mind permitted him to labor fifty years in the lievers were called Henriciain. A short 


tians, which were so much of the same mind permitted him to labor fifty years in the lievers were called Henrieians. A short 
with the apostles, received their name from cause, notwithstanding the great danger by time after the death of Peter dc Bruys at 
the great attentiveness, with which they oh- which \ he was continually surrounded, the stake, he was ensuared by the officers • ! 
served the teachings of the New Testament, When nA died, he left the lasting testimo- j the papists, taken, and made way with in 
especially the epistles of Paul. They also ny of a sincere and god-fearing man, and a such a manner that it canuot he ascertain 
were accused of the most abominable errors, large numUer of followers, who were still ed what became of him. But his doctrine 
by the clergy, hut they zealously rejected called after his name, Berengarians, until could not he suppressed with his banishment 
these accusations. They taught that the ap- about one hundred years after his death, or death, inasmuch as these truths had tak 
plication of holy baptism, aud the use of His doctrines, after his death, were so ex- en deep root in the minds of the people in 
the Holy Supper, should he confined to the tensively taught and spread abroad, that the southern part of France, that now that 
believing only. The preachers or teachers through his followers, according to the ac- they had been sprinkled with the blood i>! 
of the Paulicians, rejected every rank and count given in the Martyr's Mirror, Eng- the martyr's, they only began to spread an i 
every mark of distinction ; and desired only land, Fraucc, Italy, Bpaiu, Germany, and grow in their full strength. (To be Continued. > 


1872 


67 


E^FF-A-LID OF TRUTH. 


For the Herald ofTruth. 

Wants of the Soul. 


Man naturally possesses a great 
degree of reverence. Take liim as 
found, in the greatest degree of igno- 
rance, and yon find him worship- 
ing some great spirit, some being 
whom he looks upon as the majes- 
ty of all he beholds. It is impossi- 
ble for man, although unlettered, 
and entirely unacquainted with the 
principles of Divine or physical 
laws, to fail to see, in the works of 
creation among which he moves, a 
designing hand. Hence we find 
even the heathen bowing in adora- 
tion before some shrine, though it 
be an image, made with his own 
hands. We come nearer home and 
take up the sciences in the order 
and perfection of the present age, 
and follow principle after principle 
with the greatest care and attention; 
each succeeding step binds more! 
firmly the conviction upon our 
minds that there is a God. The re- 
sult of all research is God. God 
has written his name upon all ob- 1 
jects of creation, and turn where we j 
will, we find chronicled this great 
truth — There is a God. 

The infidel who is confronted at 
every point, by these powerful wit- 
nesses, in order to maintain his po- 
sition, must resort to the basest ! 
misrepresentations, and the most j 
evident perversions of truth. The 
heavens and the earth declare the! 
glory of God, and hence man’s heart 
is moved w-ith a desire to worship. 
Idolatry is no substitute for true 
worship, for there is no assurance 
that the Deity addressed, hears or 
answers. Science teaches the exist- 
ence of God, but nothing of the way 
by which the soul may find him. 
In all the learning and wisdom of 
philosophers, both ancient and 
modern, we find no answer to the 
cry of the soul, which feels that it 
is subject to an awful and unknown 
God. It would know what is re- 
quired of it. It seeks in vain 
through all the volumes of love for 
something to quiet this awful anxi- 
ety. The body can be fed, but the 
soul must starve, unless there is a 
knowledge of Divine law. Thank 
God there is a hook filled with gos- 
pel light and glory, upon which the 
hungry soul may feast forever. 
None are denied its blessed privile- 
ges and promises. “Come buy, 
without money and without price.” 
Men are said to exercise great wis- 


dom in the administration of tem- 
: poral things, but surely in spiritu- 
; al things they disclose the greatest 
foolishness and stupidity. 

This body which shall perish in a 
few days receives all our attention, 
but the soul, which shall live forev- 
er, is neglected. Is this the part of 
wise men, the highest order of God’s 
creation '? Let him who is truly wise 
make the immortal interests of his 
soul, the seeking of God and his 
righteousness, the supreme -object 
of human endeavor. Even if we 
had no assurance of a hereafter, it 
were far better for us, judging by 
past history, to live as do those 
who fear the Lord. Look at the 
condition of those nations who have 
abused the Lord’s mercies, and re- 
fused to honor the High and Holy 
One. TIow fearfully have they ret- 
rograded, and degenerated. Those 
nations which stand highest, both 
in point of moral excellence and in- 
tellectual development, are those 
who have respected the Christian 
religion, proving conclusively that 
though its truth may bedoubted, 
its salutary influence cannot be de- 
nied. 

• 

Reader, have you ever thought 
there was no reality in religion: 
that the wants of the soul were on- 
ly the products of an over worked, 
or morbid imagination; that there 
was no truth in the experience of 
Christians? have you joined scoffers 
in calling them fanatics, and their 
religion an enthusiasm? and yet 
you must acknowledge that you 
have seen those who have possessed 
that peace which you knew not. 
With all your wisdom, reason, and 
judgment, you have not been able to 
stifle that voice within; yon have 
not been satisfied with yourself; 
your soul has been clamoring for 
that which it possessed not, and 
you have envied the peace of those 
whom you laughed to. scorn. You 
say with a doubter of old, “ Show us 
the Lord and it suffleeth us.” Call 
Christians fools; and religion a de- 
lus ion, yet with all your derisions 
yon cannot calm your own troubled 
soul. 

Faith in God and his promises is 
the first condition to bo complied 
with in seeking his blessings. Lay 
aside self and take the Bible for your 
guide, and you will find a balm, a 
healing virtue in every precept 
which is able to heal your sin-dis- 
eased soul, and make you like the 
I perfect man, whose peace lloweth I 


like a mighty river. Oh attend to 
the interests of the soul, for it will live 
through all the vast cycles of eterni- 
ty, either as an everlasting pillar in 
the glorious temple of the New Je- 
rusalem, or an imperishable monu- 
ment of the ingratitude of man and 
the justice of Divine wrath. R. 

^ 

For the Herald of Truth. 

“Escape for Thy Life.” 

Gen. 9 : 17. 

The great necessity, and also the 
responsibility which is resting up- 
on me, constrains me to warn the 
many thousands who are yet away 
from God, and his grace. Although 
they have been told, have been 
warned, and admonished, and yet 
they willfully go on, to endless per- 
dition. They neither fear God, nor 
regard man. Therefore, as your 
friend, and one who knows the ter- 
rible doom which awaits you, once 
more I call upon you, in the name 
of him who died, that we might 
live; whoever, and wherever you 
are; all ye children of this world; 
ye children of wrath and of the dev- 
il; ye that are living as it were, 
without Christ, without hope, and 
without God in the world, what 
mean ye, that ye so carelessly and 
so wickedly spend your best, and 
perhaps your last time in the serv- 
ice of the devil, as though there 
were no God in heaven, who watch- 
es and knows all your wicked deeds 
and actions; or as though you did 
not possess a never dying soul, 
which must live forever, either in 
heaven or in hell; either in ever- 
lasting light and happiness, or in 
everlasting woe and dark despair. 
Can it be possible that you are ig- 
norant of this, since the holy gos 
pel, that heavenly message, which 
stands firmer than heaven and earth, 
has been preached throughout tin* 
world? If ye know these things 
how can it be that you still contin- 
ue to oflend your God, by trans- 
gressing and disobeying his com- 
mandments? 

Dear friends, censure me not for 
making use ofplain language. The 
word of God bears testimony that 
there is no other way nor remedy 
for every unconverted man under 
heaven, thnn either repentance or 
condemnation. Through all ages 
God has punished the transgressor 
and tlu* ungodly, and will continue 
to do so until the end of time. He 
is a God that changes not It is 




HIEIE^-XjID of truth. 




the unchangeable law of God, that Lord rained fire and brimstone from 
wicked men must repent or die. If heaven, and destroyed the ungodly 
you believe God, believe this, that and disobedient, 
there is but one of these two ways Can you, poor sinners, yet hope to 
for every wicKed man; either con- escape the righteous judgment of 
version or condemnation. You Qod? “I tell you, Nay : but except 
may put this out of your minds, ye repent, ye shall all likewise per- 
but you cannot put it out of theBi- Jude also affirms the same 

ble; there it will stand as a sealed w jth Peter; /lie tells us, “How the 
truth, which you shall experiment- Lord, having saved the people out 
ally know forever. There is no oth- 0 f the land of Egypt, afterward de- 
er way but turn or die; if you will s t r0 yed them that believed not,” 
turn, and obey the Lord, and re- because they provoked the Lord to 
pent of your sins, they will be for- anger with their unbelief, and re- 
given; but if you continue to rebel, bellion against God, and against 
and remain in your sins, death will Moses, so that the Lord swore in 
be your portion. his wrath that they should not en- 

Let us hear what Peter says in ter into liis rest; and they to whom 
his second epistle? “For if God the gospel was iirst preached, en- 
spared not the angels that sinned, tered not in because of unbelief, 
but cast them down to hell, and de- P ear friends, of that great number 
livered them to chains of darkness, (oyer six hundred thousand), which 
to be reserved unto judgment,” how left the land of Egypt, with a fair 
can you, poor mortals hope to es- prospect of entering the promised 
cape; these are now called devils, land °f Canaan, all to perish m the 
and can never be reinstated to their wilderness, for their rebellion and 
former happiness, but at the great unbelief, save Caleb and Joshua, 
coming day, they shall go to that who believed and obeyed the Lord, 
place prepared for them, and for and the innocent children of the un- 
all the wicked, and for all the na- believers. For one single act of 
tionsfcthat forget God. “And he disobedience, even Moses tin >ir lead- 
spared not the old world, but saved er was not permitted to set his feet 
Noah, the eighth person, a preach- upon the land of promise, 
er of righteousness, bringing in the Dear friends, may God help the 
Hood upon the world of the ungod- people, and some of the professors 
ly.” Although the Lord gave them in this our day, who have also start - 
a hundred and twenty years to re- ed out, and are aiming for that 
pent of their wickedness, no doubt spiritual, happy land with a fair 
that righteous preacher warned prospect and yet are living in re- 
them of their approaching danger, bellion, and disobedience against 
but tliev knew not (or in other God, his holy word and his true 
words, they made light of it, and ministers; who are determined on 
obeyed not), until the Hood came taking their own way, walking in 
and took them all away. “And pride, fashion, and in the ways of 
turning the cities of Sodom and the ungodly and sinful world, choos- 
Gomorrah into ashes, comdemned ing rather their company than the 
t hem with an overthrow, making company of true believers and wor- 
tliem an ensample unto those that shipers. AYhat will become of such 
after should live ungodly; and de- hypocrites at the great judgment 
liver just Lot, vexed with the day, the Lord knoweth best. There 
filthy conversation of the wicked are some again, who for conscience 
(for that righteous man dwelling sake do not indulge in these things 
among them, in seeing and hearing, themselves, but allow them to their 
vexed his righteous soul from day children, and frequently uphold 
to day with their unlawful deeds); them in it. When we sometimes ad- 
tlie Lord knoweth how to deliver monish them concerning this impor- 
the godly out of temptation, tant matter, we mostly receive the 
and to reserve the unjust unto the answer that others children have, 
day of judgment, to be punished.” or do the same thing, or that they 
Here we see how willing the Lord cannot prevent them, 
is to save the righteous; for he sent Dear friends, it is the truth that I 
his angels to deliver Lot and his write, and lie not, notwithstanding 
family, who took them by the hand there are some exceptions. Yet 1 
and led them out of the city, and verily believe, that this abominable 
told them to escape for their lives; sin, in nearly every case, is the fault 
find as soon as they were out, the of the parents. Whatever is plant- 


ed into the children while in infan- 
cy, will certainly branch out when 
they grow older; and it is sorrow- 
ful to relate that thus it is with the 
children of many of our plain breth- 
ren and sisters; he that hath ears to 
hear let him hear. Now my dear 
unconverted friends, and all ye care- 
less professors, I bid you in love to 
escape for your lives, for the sen- 
tence of death is passed upon you 
except ye repent. Paul, in his epis- 
tle to the liomans, writes, “ If ye 
live after the Hesli ye shall die; but 
if ye through the Spirit do mortify 
the deeds of the body, ye shall live.” 
He writes to the Hebrews, “We 
ought to give the more earnest heed 
to the things which we have heard, 
lest at any time we should let them 
slip; for if the word spoken by an 
gels was steadfast, and every trans- 
gression and disobedience received 
a just recompense of reward; how 
shall we escape, if we neglect so 
great salvation.” lie further saitli 
unto them by way of warning, “ See 
that ye refuse not him that speak - 
etli; for if they escaped not who re- 
fused him that speaketli on earth, 
much more shall not we escape if 
we turn away from him that speak- 
etli from heaven.” 

I entreat thee for Christ’s sake, 
who solemnly declared that the un 
regenerate and unconverted, cannot 
enter into the kingdom of heaven ; 
and for the Lord’s sake, who is able 
to destroy both soul and body in 
hell, to halt no longer between two 
opinions; your time may be very 
short here upon earth; the Lord 
may not grant you as much grace 
as he did unto the Ninevites, which 
was forty days. He sent his proph- 
et Jonah unto them to forewarn 
them of their approaching danger; 
he preached unto them saying, “Yet 
forty days and Nineveh shall be 
overthrown;” an account of which 
we can read in the prophet Jonah. 
The people of Nineveh believed 
God, and humbled themselves and 
repented and turned from their 
evil ways, and cried mightily unto 
God for mercy and pardon. “And 
God saw their works, that they 
turned from their evil ways; and 
God repented of the evil, that he 
had said that he would do unto 
them, and he did it not.” Now if 
the Ninevites had remained in their 
sins and wickedness, the sentence 
of God certainly would have been 
executed. 

Now remember, dear friends. 


1872 


69 


EIFIR^XjID of truth. 


that the Lord hath sent a greater 
prophet than Jonah unto us; name- 
ly Jesus Christ. Will you now al- 
so believe and obey with the Nine- 
vites, and be saved? John says, 
“He that believeth on him is not 
condemned, but he that believeth 
not is condemned already.” Jesus 
says, “ The men of Nineveh shall 
rise in judgment with this genera- 
tion, and shall condemn it; because 
they repented at the preaching of 
Jonas; and, behold a greater than 
Jonas is here.” We also read, “ For 
Moses truly said unto the fathers, a 
prophet shall the Lord your God 
raise up unto you of your brethren, 
like unto me; him shall you hear 
in all things whatsoever he shall 
say unto you; and it shall come to 
pass, that every soul, which will 
not hear that prophet, shall be de- 
stroyed from among the people,” 
Acts 3 : 22, 23. And yet I exhort 
you to be of good cheer, and not 
despair, for you can be saved if you 
will. The Lord also saitli by the 
prophet, “Again, when the wicked 
man turnetk away from his wicked- 
ness that he hath committed, and 
doeth that which is lawful and 
right, he shall save his soul alive; 
because he considereth, and turnetli 
away from all his transgressions 
that he hath committed, he shall 
surely live, he shall not die.” Ezek. 
IS; 27, 28. G. Brenneman. 

Delphos , Ohio. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

Man's Reward. 


“ Behold 1 come quickly ; and my 
reward is with me, to give every 
man according as his work shall 
be,” Rev. 22: 12. The God of nat- 
ure and the God of revelation, are 
one and the same Being. “He is 
the same yesterday, to-day, and 
forever,” and the laws which were 
written ages ago when the founda- 
tions of the earth were laid, and 
those seen in creations of the pres- 
ent day are essentially alike and 
unchangeable. 

We believe that the light of nat- 
ure, when rightly viewed, does not 
conflict with that of the gosgel, but 
may be of great assistance to us in 
understanding the great truths, of 
the Bible. Would-be wise men have 
tried, in all ages, to pervert truth, 
and make it appear what it is not, 
for “ men love darkness rather than 
light, because their deeds are evil.” 
He who sees God in everything, and 


fears to disobey his law, is the truly 
wise man. He sees the seasons fol- 
lowing each other in unbroken or- 
der bringing fruits to the diligent, 
but the fields of the slothful yield 
nothing. He remembers that the 
Lord has said, “He which sowetli 
sparingly, shall reap also sparing- 
ly.’ V' He sees the virtuous man 
walk the earth with conscious digni- 
ty, his heart full of praise to God 
for having made him a free being, 
and capable of enjoying health and 
prosperity ; but the inebriate and 
indolent lie wallowing in physical, 
and moral corruption, a disgrace to 
humanity, and an abomination to 
the Lord, and he reads, “ The Lord 
upholdeth the righteous, but the 
wicked shall perish.” He sees the 
Christian with a holy light on his 
countenance, and perfect peace in 
his heart; but the impious thought, 
reveling in all the luxuries which 
wealth can procure, dissatisfied and 
unhappy, and he says, It is written, 
“These shall go away into everlast- 
ing punishment; but the righteous 
into life eternal.” 

Nature and the Bible unite in 
teaching us the certainty of reward, 
and that it shall be according to 
works. Reader, is your heart pure? 
Are you waiting your master's com- 
ing? Would it be well with you should 
he call to-day? Oh, if you have 
not the assurance that it is well 
with you now, delay no longer. 
Seek his favor now, for you know 
not what hour he may call you to 
appear before him to give an ac- 
count of the deeds done. There is 
no safety out of Christ. His blood 
can make the vilest clean. Bless 
the Lord, our future may be bright, 
and our reward sure. R. 


The Law anil a Christian. 


The law was given twice upon 
Mount Sinai; but the appearance of 
the Lord when he gave it the second 
time, was wonderfully different from 
that, when at the first he delivered 
it to Israel. When he gave it the 
Hrst time, he caused his terror and 
severity to appear before Moses, to 
the shaking of his soul, and the 
dismaying of Israel; but when he 
gave it the second time, he caused 
all his goodness to pass before 
Moses, to the comfort of his con- 
science, and the bowing of his heart. 
When he gave it the first time, it 
was with thunderings and light- 
nings, with blackness and darkness, 


with Hame and smoke, and in tearing 
sound of the trungpet; but when he 
gave it the second time, it was with 
a proclamation of his name, mer- 
ciful and gracious, long-suffering, 
and abundant in goodness and truth, 
keeping mercy for thousands, for- 
giving iniquity, transgressions and 
sins. When he gave it the first time, 
Moses was called to go up to re- 
ceive it through the Hre, which made 
him exceedingly fear and quake; 
but when he went to receive it the 
second time, he was put in a cleft 
of the rock. 

From all which I gather, that, 
though as to the matter of the law, 
both as to its being given the first 
time, and the second, it binds the 
unbeliever under the pains of eternal 
damnation (if he closes not with 
Christ by faith); yet as to the man- 
ner of its giving at these two times, 
I think the first doth principally in- 
tend its force as a covenant of works, 
not at all respecting the Lord Jesus ; 
but this second time (at least in the 
manner of its being given), not res- 
pecting such a covenant, but rather 
as a rule, or directory, to those who 
already are found in the cleft of the 
rock, Christ. For the saint himself, 
though he be without law to God, 
as it is considered, the Hrst or old 
covenant, yet even he is not without 
law to him as considered under 
grace; “not without law to God, 
but under the law to Christ,” 1 Cor. 
9: 27. 

Though therefore it be sad with 
the unbeliever, because he only, 
and wholly standeth under the law 
as it is given in fire and smoke, and 
blackness and darkness, and thun- 
der, all which threaten him with 
eternal ruin if he fulfill not the ut- 
most tittle thereof; yet the believer 
stands to the law under no such 
consideration, neither is he so at all 
to hear or regard it, for lie is now 
removed from thence to the blessed 
mountain of Zion, to grace and for- 
giveness of sins. He is now, I say, 
by faith in the Lord Jesus, shroud- 
ed under so perfect and blessed a 
righteousness, that this thundering- 
law of Mount Sinai cannot find the 
least fault or diminution therein : 
but rather approveth and alloweth 
thereof, either when or wherever it 
finds it. This is called the “right- 
eousness of God without the law,” 
and is also said to be “ witnessed 
by both the law and the prophets; 
even the righteousness of God, which 
is by faith in .lesus Christ, unto all 



HERALD OH TRUTH. 




and upon all them that believe, 
for there is no difference,” Rom. 3: 
21,22. Wherefore, whenever thou 
who believeth in Jesus, dost hear 
the law in its thundering and light- 
ning tits, as if it would burn up heaven 
and earth, then say thou, I am freed 
from this law, these thunderings 
have nothing to do with my soul; 
nay, even this law, while it thus 
thunders and roars, doth both allow 
and approve of my righteousness. 

1 know that Hagar would sometimes . 
be domineering and high, even in 
Sarah’s house, and against her; but 
this she is not to be suffered to do, 
nay, though Sarah herself be barren. 
Wherefore serve it also as Sarah 
served her, and expel her from thy 
house. My meaning is, when this 
law with its thundering threatenings 
doth attempt to lay hold on you or 
your conscience, shut it out with a 
promise of grace; cry, ‘The inn is 
taken up already; the Lord Jesus 
is here entertained, and there is no 
room for the law. Indeed, if it 
will be content with being my in- 
structor, and so lovingly leave off" 
to judge me, 1 will be content; it 
shall be in my sight, I will also de- 
light therein ; but otherwise, I being- 
now made upright without it, and 
that too with that righteousness of 
which this law speaks well and ap- 
proves. I may not, will not, cannot, 
dare not make it my Savior and 
Judge, nor suffer it to sot up its 
government in my conscience; for 
by so doing I fall from grace, and 
Jesus Christ doth profit me nothing.’ 

Thus, therefore, the soul that is 
married to him, that is raised up 
from the dead, both may and ought 
to deal with this law of God; yea, it 
doth greatly dishonor its Lord, and 
refuse its gospel privileges, if it at 
any time doth otherwise, what ever 
it sees or feels. “The law hath 
power over the wife so long as her 
husband liveth; but if her husband 
be dead, she is freed from that law; 
so that she is no adulteress, though 
she be married to another man.” 
Indeed, so long as thou art alive to 
sin, and to the righteousness which 
is of the law, so long thou hast 
them for thy husband, and they 
must reign over thee; but when 
once they are become dead unto thee, 
as they then most certainly will, 
when thou closest with the Lord 
Jesus Christ, then, 1 say, Thy former 
husbands have no more power to 
meddle with thee; thou art freed 
from their law. Set the case: a wo- 


man be cast into prison for a debt 
of hundreds of pounds; if after this 
she marry, yea, though while she is ; 
yet in the jailer’s hands in the same 
day that she be joined to her lius- ■ 
band, her debt is all become his; 
yea, and the law also that arrested 
and imprisoned this woman, as free- 
ly tells her, go. Slie is freed from 
that, saitli Paul; and so saith the 
law of this land. The sum then, to 
what hath been said, is this, The 
.Christian hath now nothing to do 
with the law as it thunderetli and 
burnetii on Sinai, or as it bindetli 
the conscience to wrath and the dis- 
pleasure of God for sin; for by its 
thus appearing, he is freed by faith ; 
in Christ. Yet he is to have regard 
thereto, and is to count it holy, just, 
and good; which, that he may do, 
he is always, whenever In* seetli or 
regards it, to remember that he who 
gave it to us, “is merciful and gra- 
cious, long-suffering, and abundant 
in goodness and truth,” &c. Exod. 
34 : H — 0. — John Bunyan. 

Selected try J. Bkksiiy. 

Ontario. 

— — • m> 

Serving (Sod in Little Things. 

It seems to be a much too common 
notion among professing Christians 
that the quantity of our service has 
a close relation to its quality. If we 
could give our bodies to be burned, 
once for all, and then enjoy heaven 
forever, we seem to imagine that it 
would profit more than a daily 
doing of our allotted humble-life 
work in the spirit of that charity 
that seeketh not her own. So many 
of us like to do some great thing; 
to rescue a child from a burning 
dwelling, or save a man from drown- 
ing, would be an act of heroism that 
would cause men to praise us for 
years, and the memory of it would 
be very pleasant. A goodly sum 
cast into the Lord’s treasury by the 
rich is much more apt to win praise 
of men and minister to self-satisfac- 
tion than the “widow’s mite,” given 
by the poor. The building of a 
costly church edifice on the corner 
of some fashionable avenue, seems 
by many to be considered a worthier 
service than gathering in the lost, 

| from the “ streets and lanes.” 

Put this is a vain, glorious view. 
Because men see and praise the 
great deeds, and only God takes 
note of the little, hidden sacrifices; 
shall we therefore, idly sit and wait 
for a rare opportunity to come and 


usher us into greatness? Be not de- 
ceived; men note our little actions 
more than we think; but if we trim 
our conduct to please them, are we 
the single-hearted servants of God; 
are we serving one master or two? 

“The little chips are nearest the 
heart.” Little, unconscious acts are 
the most characteristic. If we are 
faithful in the least things, it is easy 
to infer that we shall be faithful in 
greater things, and if we are unfaith- 
ful in the least, how shall we be 
found faithful in that which is 
greater ? 

If it were the regular, daily work 
of our lives to pull children out of 
burning buildings, how wearisome 
it would become, in spite of the her- 
oism and “greatness” of the work. 
The stoutest would soon sink under 
the strain. 

The Lord’s measure of great and 
small is not the same as man’s. lie 
looks at the heart. He loves hearty 
service. Whatsoever ye do , do it 
heartily as unto the Lord and not 
\ unto men. The daily labor in any 
honest trade or profession, the bak- 
ing of a loaf of bread by a weary 
mother, the tying of a baby’s shoe, 
the kindly helps and respects due 
to the aged, lending to a neighbor, 
entertaining strangers, the keeping 
of a meek and quiet spirit, amid the 
nameless and numberless trials and 
vexations of a daily life; these and 
such like little things are tests of 
the stuff we are made of, proofs of 
our single-heartedness, and in doing 
them* we may serve the Lord as 
heartily as if we spoke ‘with tongues 
of men and angels;” removed moun- 
tains, understood all mysteries, and 
exercised much for emotional hap- 
{ pin ess. 

To toil steadily day by day, in 
any honest calling; to “guide the 
house;” to keep a family cleanly 
and comfortably clothed, and whole- 
somely fed ; to train children in 
ways of gentleness and patience, 
and habits of prompt obedience, to 
strictly insist on truth-telling in all 
things, and correct all deceit, to 
teach them the commandments of 
God, and the love of Christ; to do 
these things, 1 say, “heartily as un- 
to the Lord,” is to serve him accept- 
ably. And then if he should desire 
greater service he will show us the 
way in due time. 

“A little leak may sink a ship.” 
A little needless self-indulgence, be 
it in “bitters,” opiates, sleep, food, 
or drink, may help to sink a soul. A 


1872 


71 


ETHIELjAILD of truth. 


little bad temper may vex a house- 
hold, annoy half a neighborhood, 
and weaken a society in the church. 
A little uncharitable talk may cause 
much trouble. But love, like grav- 
itation, influences the least things 
as well as the greatest. How much 
good a word or a look may do if it 
springs from a true, loving heart. 
There must be no affectation of hu- 
mility, “let love be without dissim- 
ulation.” Whatever our work may | 
be, whether we account it great or ' 
small, let us serve our Lord faith- 
fully. “ For the eyes of the Lord 
run to and fro throughout the whole 
earth to show himself strong pw be- ; 
half of them whose heart is perfect 
before him .”— Earnest Christian. 

For t ho II oral (1 of Truth. 

REJOICE. 


much greater care should watch over 
the young babes in Christ, that they 
fall not into the temptations of the 
world. * * 

SangervilJe , Va. 

— 

For the Ilerald ut Truth. 

Gospel Truths. 


In reading a passage of Scripture, 1 was 
struck with the remark of the apostle in 
which he says, ‘-.Jesus Christ, the same yes- 
terday, to-day and forever.” By this we eau 
see that “ every good gift and every perfect 
gift is from above, and cometh down from 
die Father of lights, with whom is no varia- 
bleness, neither shadow of turning.” We 
should look unto Jesus the author and tin- 
isher of our faith ; who for the joy that was 
set before him endured the cross, despising 
the shame,, and is set down at the right 
hand of the throue of Hod. “IV ithout faith 
it is impossible to please him; l'or he that 


Dear brother, 1 have frequently I 
thought of writing a few lines for 
the Ilerald, but knowing 1 could not 
write an article as edifying as many 
others, T have deferred it; but in the j 
December number 1 received a good 
reproof in these words, “He that 
would climb to the top of the ladder 
must not despise the lower round.” 
Thus it is with the sinner, he must 
commence to love Jesus; leave off 
sinning, and repent. How glad we 
are when sinners turn from their evil 
ways. During our communion meet- 
ing at the Bank Meeting-house, in 
October last, there were seventeen i 
souls made a public profession of 
their faith in Christ by baptism. 
Oh, how my soul was made to re- 
joice to see so many manifest a will- 
ingness to renounce the world, with 
all its vanities and fleeting pleasures, 
for the love of Jesus. 

This world is no friend of the child 
of God, hence my fears have arisen 
for these young and tender branches, 
lest the chilly blasts of temptation 
should turn them aside. Oil, what 
a vast held of labor there is for the i 
church every where, to watch over 
the young babes in Christ. W e [ 
should not only rejoice that they 
have been born ‘into the church, but 
we should strive to feed them with 
the sincere milk of the Word. AN e 
should avoid all idle and vain con- 
versation, that they may not see 
any thing in our walk and conver- 
sation that might lead them astray. 
Even as a mother rejoices in the per- 
fection of her offspring, and watches 
and nourishes them with the great- 
est care, so we, dear brethren, with 


cometh to God must believe that he is ami 
that he is a rewanler of them that diligently 
seek him,” “who bath saved us, and called 
us with a holy calling, not according to our 
works, but according to his own purpose and 
-■•race, which was given us iu Christ Jesus 
before the world began, who will have all 
men to he saved aud to come unto the 
knowledge of the truth, There is oue God, 
and oi\c mediator between God and men, 
the man Christ Jesus ; who gave himself a 
ransom for all, to he testified in due time. 
If we then l>e risen with Christ, let us also 
seek those things which are above, where 
I Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Let 
j us set our affections on things above, not on 
things on the eaith, for we are dead, and 
our hfe is hid with Christ in God. 

When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, 
then shall we also appear with him in glory ; 
iu whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom 
and knowledge, and the peace of God which 
passeth all understanding, shall keep our 
hearts and mi rids through Jesus Christ; for 
it is God which worketh in us both to will 
and to do of his good pleasure. lie gave 
himself for our sius, that lie might deliver 
us from this present evil world, according 
to the will of God and our heavenly Father ; 
for our light afflictions, which in but for a 
moment, worketh for us a far more exceed- 
ing and eternal weight of glory; while we 
look not at the things which are seen, but 
at the things which are not scon ; for the 
things which are seen arc temporal ; but 
the things which are not seen are eternal. 
This is life cterual, that tlu-y might know 
thee, the only true God, and Jesus < hrist, 
whom thou hast sent. This is the will of 
him that sent me, that every one which 
seetli the Son, and believeth on him, may 
have everlasting life ; and I will raise him 
up at the last day. Verily, verily, I say 
unto you, He that heareth my word and be- 
lieveth on him that sent me, hath everlasting 
i life, and shall not come into condemnation ; 


but is passed from death unto life. For God 
so loved the world, that he gave his onl) 
begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on 
him should not -perish, but have everlasting 
life. For as many as received him, to them 
gave he power to become the sons of God, 
even to them that -believed on his name ; 
which were horn, not. of blood, nor of the 
will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but 
of God, and the Word was made flesh, and 
dwelt among us, and we beheld his glory, 

(the glory as of the only begotten ot the 
Father), full of grace and truth. Cnto him 
that is able to keep us from falling, and to 
present us faultless before the preseuce of 
his glory with exceeding joy. lo the only 
wise God our Savior, he glory and majest\ , 
dominion and power, both uow and evei 
Amen. 

Xim/ara. ArRAIIAM WlTMER 

— ^ 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Work Harder. 

Dear brethren and sisters, we as profes- 
sors of Christ have a great work to do 
Oli let us try by the help of God to work 
harder for the salvation of our souls. If we 
do not labor for them they will be for ever lost 
We know not how long we may be spared, 
therefore let us labor while it is yet called 
to-day. 

Just notice, dear readers, how we toil 
and labor to accumulate the perishable 
things of earth. Many labor almost night 
and day, aud seldom or never take a thought 
for the wants of the soul, which if not prop- 
erly cared for, will go down to perdition. 

I fear we are two careless about the one 
thing needful. Let us be more prayerful . 
for one another : manifest a greater and purer 
love for each other, and try to live nearei 

Jesus. „ .. .. 

Let us be watchful, lest Satan with Ins 
many snares and temptation again lead us 
captive into his net. The work we have 
begun is so important that we dare uot be 
idle if we wish to be saved, but if v/e hold 
out faithful unto the end it shall be well 
with us and we shall receive the crown 
Christ (lied to redeem us, and he that has 
Christ has hope of immortality. Can we 
not do more than we have done to show our 
love and gratitude to him? l>o we love 
our enemies, and pray for those who perse- 
cute, and despitefully use us? if not. when 
we come to die, we will be sorry that we 
were so slack iu serving the Lord and obey- 
ing his commands ; theiefore brethren and 
sisters, lot us be active and work harder h>r 
our souls. 

O no, we have not always done, 

As he would have us do : 

And since we have so often failed, 

Will now begin anew. 

We are too weak l know full well, 

To run the race alone ; 

But with the Savior’s helping hand, 

We may a! 1 hist reach home. 

Van Wnt. PllKliK Bkidi.ER. 


~Xr~ 





72 


EEEE&AIj'D OF TRUTH. 


itralb of 



Elkhart, Ind., May 1872. 


To oo* Subscribers. — If .any of our subscribers do not 
get tlioir papers regularly, or if any persons who send ior 
books, Ac., do not obtain them in due time, they will confer 
a favor by informing us, and we will do our best to have 
everything properly forwarded to its destination. 

■ o 

How to send Monet. — If in sums more than a dollar, it 
is best to obtain either a draft, or a Tost Oftice money 
order, or where these cannot be obtained, get the letter 
registered. 

o 

TuoSE of our subscribers who do not wish to take the 
Herald of Truth any longer, will please to inform 11s of 
the fact by letter and pay up all arrearages, and the 
matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it will 
te considered that they wish to continue their subscriptions 

Correction. — In the notice of the Con- 
f, ■rence in Illinois , in the last number, we said, 
Those coming from the East should take the 
cars on the Galena Railroad to Sterling. 
Wc should have said, The North Western 
Railroad. The cars in Chicago will leave 
from the old Galena or Wells street Depot. 


J. C. Ilunsicker, "Berlin, Waterloo co., Ont. j ern brethern, to be held in the state of Illi- 
Jacob Funk, near Line Lexington, Bucks nois, the brethern there have decided to hold 
-p /' their first Conference in that district, in 

toun a ' their Meeting-house near Sterling, in 

Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, Lancas- Whiteside county, on the fourth Friday in 
ter county, Pa. May, (May 24th,) at which time and place 

all the bishops, ministers and deacons, as 

The Bloody Theatre or Martyr’s well as all brethern and sisters are cordially 
Mirror in English. find earnestly invited to be present. 


Inasmuch as there have been many inqui 
ries recently for the Martyr’s Mirror in the 


Inasmuch as this is the first Conference 
which our Church holds iu the state of II- 

^ . , ,i linois, it is earnestly desired that as many of 

English language, we now make a proposal . th<j miniBter8 ofou f Church as can, from all 


to reprint the same, providing a sufficient 
number of subscribers can be obtained. The 
size of the book will be about 8 by 1 1 inch- 
es, will contain about 1000 double column 
pages ; bound in leather, and will cost 85,00. 


parts of the country, should try to meet to 
gether there. 

A Conference held in the right spirit, 
may be the means of doing much good, and 
we hope our meeting together there, will 


A x i • n • -II prove a lasting benefit to all whose privilege 

Any person taking 12 copies will obtain the I f , r ° 

thi w C T n C ° W f T- r ' ' The Chinch is located several miles north 

\\ 1 th the present issue of our paper we j of the t0WQ of sterling. Those coming from 

will send subscription circulars, and those the cast wi n take the cars on the North 

receiving them we hope will try and get as Western Railroad to Sterling. those 

many subscribers as possible aud return the j coming from the south on the Illinois Cen- 

paper to us at their earliest convenience, so | tral will change at Dixon and go west to 


Bro. Christian Brunk, formerly of 
Edom, llockiugham county, A’irginia, has re- 
cently removed to N. T. Stcvensburg, Fred- 
erick county, Virginia, not far from Win- 
chester, where there is a church of some 
twenty members, who have been without a 
shepherd until Bro. Brunk moved to that, 
place. We hope his labors in the vineyard 
of the Lord, in that place, may he blessed 
with abundant success, and that he may he 
able by the help of the Lord to bring many 
souls to Christ. Ilis Post office is X. T. 
Stevensburg. 


that we may know how many will he needed. 

As this work is a valuable one, setting 
forth the faith, doctrine and practice of the 
early Christians, together with their belief on 
baptism, & c., it is to be hoped that our peo- 
ple will take an active interest in the matter 
and thus help to spread abroad the truth. 

J. F. Funk & Bro. 


iHeiino Simon’s Complete Works, in 

the English language are now ready for de- 
livery. All who wish to obtain this valua- 
ble work may have it promptly forwarded 
to them, by seuding in their orders to this 
office. The price of the work is 84.50 cents 
per copy. Any person taking 12 copies 
will receive one gratis. We have "one to a 
great expense in translating and publishing 
the work, so that our people might have the 
opportunity to examime and read the wri- 
tings ol the eminent reformer whose name 
our church bears, and we hope our friends 
will feel an interest iu selling as many copies 
as possible. Single copies of the work may 
he sent by mail, and those wishing to have 
them thus sent will please add G4cts to the 
price for postage. It may he obtained at 
the following places: 

J. E. Barr’s Bookstore, Lancaster, Pa. 


Conferences. 

The annual Conference in Ontario 
Canada, will be held on Friday, tho 31st of 
May, in Chr. Eby’s Meeting-house, near 
Berlin, if the Lord permit. All who desire 
to visit us will leave the ears at Berlin. The 
Meetin "-house is about one mile distant. 

o 

The annual Conference for the State 
of Ohio, will he held in Mahoning County, 
on the third Friday in May. The nearest 
station is Columbiana, on the Pittsburg, 
Fort Wayne and Chicago K. K. 

The Annual Conference of the Ornish 
Mennonite Church will meet the present 
year on Whit Sunday, in Lagrange County, 
Indiana. This Conference will continue 
from day to day until the business of the 
Conference is disposed of. 

The next Semi-annual Conference 
of the Evangelical Mennonite Church will 
he held in the Coopcrslmrg Meeting-house, 
in Lehigh Co., Pa., on the first Tuesday in 
June 1872. On Monday evening previous 
a missionary meeting will he held. 


Sterling. Should no one be there to meet 
them, they will inquire of Pre.Jos. Alien- 
bach, who lives only a short distance north 
of town, where they will he hospitably re- 
ceived. 

Should any brethern desire to visit them 
at their regular time of meeting, they will 
observe that the meeting at Sterling occur- 
red on the 25th of Febuary and then every 
two weeks, and on the 3rd of March at Mor 
rison and every two weeks thereafter. 

This invitation is extended by request of 
Bro. Henry Nice, on behalf of the Church. 


Conference In Illinois. 

In accordance with the decision of the 
Conference in Indiana hist Fall, that a new 
Conference district be formed for the west- 


Sunday Schools. 

Spring time has come, and now that tho 
roadsare good again and the weather pleasant. 
We hope the Sabbath Schools which have 
been closed during the winter will be re- 
opened. Such a necessary and important 
work should not he neglected. Our young 
people need the school and the older ones 
too will find them a great benefit. 

There arc however still a great many 
neighborhoods where tho Sabbath School 
is comparatively little knowu. 

We hope therefore that our people every 
where, will make an effort to gather their 
young people together iu the Sunday School 
and there especially instruct them in the 
faith once delivered to the saints, and thus 
try to implant these principles of the gospel 
into their minds so that they shall never 
be forgotten. Tn this manner our young 
people may not only be retained in the 
church, but they may early be brought to 
walk in the fear of the Lord, and to conse- 
crate themselves unto his service. 

We hope all parents too will feel a deep in- 
terest in this matter, and not only encourage 
their children to attend the Sabbath School, 
but will also attend themselves and help to 
instruct the younger people and thus en- 


courage the work. 



lEIFF/A-LID of truth. 


orresponhcncc. 


A Journey to New York and Canada. 


If indeed persons sometimes feel that they five o’clock P. M. and met Bro. Brenneman b 
cannot themselves take an active part in and Bro. Martin at the station. In the h 
the Sabbath School, they with their presence evening we had a pleasant and well attend- a 
may "ive a great deal of encouragement to ed meeting in a school-house in the village, h 
those & who do take an active part in the It was our privilege here for the first time , a 
school. Therefore let us do all we can; to meet our brother and fellow laborer in 1 
a little here and a little there makes up the | the Lord’s vineyard, Jacob Hahn, whose 
great life work which we all have to do. j name may be familiar to many ol our 1 
So let us be zealous and not grow weary readers. 

for in due time also we shall reap if we The next day we had meeting both in 1 
faint not. . the forenoon and afternoon at the meeting- | * 

■ — ^ "iL -!i ::■■■■ — house, near -Bro. Good’s, where we met a 

. "oodly number of brethren aud sisters, and 

(l Htrcspnitonicc. wc hope our efforts to declare the words of j ] 

truth may not have been in vain. In the * 
- evening I went home with Bro. Metz, stop- 

A Journey to New York and Canada, ping on our way to visit Sister Sneavly, 

i whose husband had died that morning ot a 

On the 10th of April I left home and at fever. Sister Metz also is greatly afflicted 
Coldwater, Michigan, Bro. Daniel Brenne- 1 with paralysis, so that she is unable to he 
man met mo and we proceeded to Buffalo, out- May God bless her under her severe 
N. Y., where Bro John Lapp, of Williams- afflictions. 

ville, Erie County, with his son and friend Wc attended another meeting, in a meet- 
Boyer of Rainham township, Ont., met us, ; ing-house, in Harris Ilill that evening, and 
with the request that at least one of us should [ went home with Bro. Lapp, where 1 spent 
accompany him, with friend Boyer, to Bain- the night. > . 

ham there to attend the funeral services of The next day at about G o clock 1^ arrived 
Bro. Jacob Hoover who had died on the at Jordan, in the vicinity of the twenty, 
9th. (See deaths). where I found Bro. Abm. Kratz and son 

Bro. Brenneman then went on to Williams- waiting my arrival. In the evening we had 

ville, while I complied with the request of a pleasant aud well attended meeting in the 
Bro. Lapp. After spending some time pleas- meeting-house. The next forenoon ( I ues- 
antly in the city of Buffalo, and enjoying day) we had meeting in the Hill meeting- 
ihe kind hospitality of Mrs. Leib and family, house. In the afternoon we had meeting 
we proceeded on our way to Dunnville, on again at Moyer’s meeting-house where the , 
the Grand River, in Ontario, about 40 miles young people especially had been invited, i 
west of Buffalo. and where remarks, applicable both to 

We spent the night with Bro. Iviudig, I parents and children were made. Altei j 
some 1G miles w‘est of Dunnville, and the meeting, the young people and children met 
next day (Friday) attended the funeral of J in the capacity of a Sunday School, ior in- 
Bro. Hoover, who was buried only a short struction and also singing. In this noigh- 
distance from his residence, followed to the borhood the young people occasionally meet 
grave by a large concourse of friends aud for singing in order to practice the tunes 
relatives. The fuueral was a most solemn usually sung in meeting, and the advantage 
occasion, especially for the bereaved mother of this course is plainly manifest, wlieu we 
and children; but we trust they will he able , heard the voices ot the young people join m 
to put their trust in God, feeling that the with the older people in singing songs o 
Judge of all the earth, doeth all tilings right praise to God. W e hope our brethren m 
and well, and may he sanctify this affliction many other places will follow their example, 
and bereavement to their eternal welfare. and gather together their young people and 
There is in this vicinity a small cornmu- teach them to sing, and not only to 
nity of our people. The name of their min- after the letter, hut with the heart and the 
ister is Bernhard Werner, and their deacon understanding also. In manym our churches 
was the deceased Bro. Hoover. Wc hope there is great need indeed that both old ami 
God will bless them, so that the church may young should try to sing better than the) 
grow and extend her borders unto the sal- do, and by a similar course the singing 
ration of many souls. might he greatly improved, and the church 

We spent the night with Bro. Abm. lligli, itself would be blessed and strouathencl, 
in South Cayuga, where there is also another and many might thus be gathered m w u> 


congregation of our people. Their minis- otherwise could not be induced to come, 
ters are Bro. High, Bro. Culp, and Bro. The people love to sing and to hear singing. 
Gehman ; the latter was absent on a visit to and David says, « - It is </ood to » no, t >raw* 
Bucks county, Pa. at the time, so that it was 1 unto (hr Lord. 1 hen let us learn to do, and 
not our privilege to meet him. to do well t his thing which is well pleasing in 

On Saturday morning, in company with the sight of the Lord, 
the two brethren High, we took the train at ; 1 also visited the aged brother and felloi - 

Dunnville and at Shirk’d crossing they left laborer in the vineyard ot the Lord 1 
us to attend an appointment there, where man Moyer, who for some time has men 
there is a small church also without a min- greatly afflicted. Having had a stroke o 
i 8ter the palsy, so that his left side is paralyzed, 

We arrived safely at Clarence Centre about ' and lie is unable to move about without 


being carried. W e hope tho Lord will give 
him grace and strength to bear his afflictions, 
and to hold out faithful unto the end, for 
he that endureth to the end shall be saved, 
and our sufferings hero are alter all, oul) 
light when we look unto the great reward. 

The other ministers here ars Abraham 
Hunsberger and Abraham Rittcnliouse. 
There is quite a large church in this vicin- 
ity and the harvest truly is great, so that 
they have sufficient to do. W e hope the 
Lord will bless their efforts, and give them 
i strength aud wisdom from on high, so that 
they may be instrumental iu briuging many 
souls to Christ. They have also made arrange- 
ments to have English preaching at stated 
times on Sunday afternoons. 

In the evening there was another meeting 
on the Hill where the house was crowded, 
but the best order and attention was given. 
There were also many young people present. 
And Oh, how do we wish that they might 
all be gathered into the fold of Christ ; we 
love tho young people; we love to invite 
I them into the house ol God ; we love to 
take them by the hand and lead them to the 
feet of Jesus ; we love to declare unto them 
how Jesus loves them ; how he died tor 
them ; how he invites them to come to him 
and be saved. We love to see them in the 
house of God ; we love to hear them sing 
and manifest an interest and take part in all 
the services of God s house, and abo\e all 
’ want to meet them at the right hand of 
’ God ; we want to see them with their white 
robes, washed in the blood ol the Lamb , }o.i. 

, we want to meet them all in licavon. Deal 
r young friends, forget it not. And we can 
t say the same to our older friends and rela- 
tives, our brethren and sisters. Some of them 
] are already old, and the days of their pil 
t "limage perhaps are well nigh ended, hut 
s by the "race ol God wc hope they nia) all 
e 1 be faithful and endure the sufferings and 
L , ; tribulations of this lower world, until in the 
! i "lorv of the world beyond, through the 
y power of a risen Redeemer, this mortality 
„ shall put on immortality, and we shall sing 
, the song of the redeemed, where suffering 
,j and t ribulation sliall never he ieft again. 

On Wednesday I left this neighborhood ; 
" meeting Bro. Brenneman and friend M itmer, 
JS from Suspension Bridge, at St. Catharines. 
[\ At Bothwell, some G8 miles East of Detroit 
V Friend Witmer and myself stopped, and the 
next morniug found our way about four and 
b a half or five miles South East of Bothwell, 

1 where there is a settlement of our people— 
j some ten or twelve families without a mini* 
e ter. There we found the. brethren Tillman 
: r , and Abm. Moyer; the three brothers Bru- 
baker and others, and in the evening 
id had a meeting in their school-house. I »« v 
• m have however now made arrangements with 
the ministers in M atcrloo to visit them and 
iv- have meeting every four weeks. 1 he la.-t 
11. meeting was on the 14th of April and lmm 
■ll thence every four weeks. ^ l heir place ot 
of meeting is school-house No. 1<>, Township 
d of Mosa. Their desire is that ministers 
ut ' should visit them. We hope the Lord will 




*4 


herald of teeth. 



l)less and prosper them, and in due time gi'e 
them also a faithful shepherd to go in and 
out before them. The next day I started 
for home, where I arrived safely on Saturday 
morning. I feel thankful for the kindness 
manifested towards me by all whom I met. 
May God reward them all. I also feel thank- 
ful to God for his protecting care. 

John F. Fi nk. 


A Request. 

i 

There are some ten or twelve lamilieS oi j 
the Mcnnonite church in this neighborhood 
(Aldbrough township, Flgin county, Ont.), | 
without a minister, and if any ministers : 
should travel the Great Western Railroad, 
we would like it very much if they would j 
stop with us. We live four and a hall miles | 
from Bothwcll Station, and should be very 
happy to letch any one from the station if j 
they would write to us a few days before 
they come 

Abm. 15. Brubaker. 
('iishmnY, Middlesex Co., Ont. 


fydbrtn’s fhpartmmt. 

^ LJ 

My Travels. 


Dear children, to fulfill my promise, I 
will now give you the last of my travels in 
Pennsylvania. 1 enjoyed my visit in Lan- 
caster couufy as much as any one i have 

made. ! 

The last three weeks of my stay there 1 
visited in the neighborhood of Mount Joy, [ 
where 1 met many warm, kind-hearted 
friends. 1 cannot recollect all the names of 
my little friends with whom I met, but the j 
following T have not forgotten, and l believe j 
I never sh all. Annie B., Willie II- S. and j 
Willie B. Among my young friends Mary 
It. will remain fixed in my memory until, by 
the grace of God, we meet where parting 
will be no more. There are mary others j 
whose love and friendship will not he for- , 
gotten, but their names T do not now 
remember. 

While in this neighborhood I visited the J 
following schools, which I hope will benefit i 
myself and the children. The Newtown, | 
Donegal, Franklin and 1 nion schools. . I 

It was my privilege also to visit the city j 
of Philadelphia. I spent two days in visit- ! 
ing some of the principal places in the city. 

I went to t lie navy yard, and saw there 
hundreds of large cannons, many of which 
would weigh perhaps two tons, and shoot a 
hall 16 or 1 8 inches in diameter. I saw 
also thousands of halls and shells stacked up 
on great heaps. These are all prepared to 
destroy people’s lives. 

Oh! what a terrible thing it is to think 
of men killing each other by thousands, as 
they do in time of war. Surely this is not 
the work of God; but the work oi Satan. 
Neither will the Spirit of Christ ever prompt 


any one to go to war and kill his enemies ; 
for he savs, “Love your enemies; do good 
to them that hate you, and pray for them 
which despitefully use you, and persecute 
you.” And this men cannot do, and also 
o-o and kill them. 

° i a i S o feel sure that the Lord J esus taught 
his followers not to fight or go to war and 
kill people; for when the Jews saw that 
many believed on him, and followed him, 
they became afraid, and said, “ 5V hat do 
we ? for this man doeth many miracles. - Tf , 
we let him thus alone, all men will believe 
i on him, and the Romans shall come, and 
take away both our place and nation. j 

T} ie .lews knew that .lesus taught the 
I people uot to tight, and that ii all men 
believed on him, and did what he told them, 
i there would he none left to tight against the 
j Romans, and they could come and do as 
they pleased— take away both their place 
and nation. 1 hope none of my little read- 
ers, who love Jesus, will ever disobey him 
by going to war to kill people. 

I saw many strange tilings in this great 
city, which would take up too much room if 
I was to tell them all. I expect, sometime 
before long, to make another visit to Penn- 
sylvania, if my life is spared. The most of 
my travels this summer will be in Ohio. I 
may perhaps make a short visit to Canada, 
but am not certain. My little friends over 
there have given me many very cordial invi- 
tations, and 1'would like very much to com- 
ply with their earnest entreaties. They have 
written many letters to 

Brother Henry. 


bid them not ; for cfsuch is the kingdom of 
God. Luke 18: 1G. 

TT'eep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips 
IV p rom speaking guile. Ps. 31 : 13. 

I 


from speakin; 

yinrr lips are abomination to the Loid , but 
U they that deal truly are his delight. Prov 
12 : 22. 

ST y sou, give me thy heart, and let thine eyir 
dl observe my ways. Prov. 2.3 : 2G. 

N ow is the accepted rime ; behold, now is 
the day of salvation. 2 Cor. G : 2. 




0 


Scripture Alphabet. 

Selected by Mary Kessler. 


that my ways were directed to keep thy 
statutes! Ps. 119: 5. 

pray for the peaccoi Jerusalem: they dim 
1 prosper that love thee. Ps. 122: b. 

Q uicken me after thy loving-kindness; so 
shall I keep the testimony of thy mouth 
Ps. 119 : 88. 

Dewember now tlry Creator in the days of 
h thy youth, while the evil days come not, 
nor the years draw nigh, when thou shah 
say, t have no pleasure in them. Keel. 12:1- 

C ear eh the Scriptures; for iu tliemye think 
i ^ ye have eternal life; and they are they 
which testify of me. John 5: 39. 

j rrhe fear of the Lord is the begin u ing of 
1 wisdom : a good understanding have jill 
they that do his commandments: his pram* 
endureth forever. Ps. Ill: 10. 

nto thee will T pray; my voice shalt thou 
hear in the morning, O Lord ; in the 
morning will I direct my prayer unto thee 
and will look up. Ps. 5. 2 : 3. 

Verily, verily, Isay unto you, lie that he 
» lie ve th on me hath everlasting hie 
John G : -17. 

Therewithal shall a young man cleanse h 


U’ 


A s the heaven is high above the earth, so | 
great is his mercy toward them that fear 
him. Ps. 103:11. . I 

I Messed is the man that walketh uot in the | 
) counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth iu j 
t h e way of sinners — P s. 1 : 1 . 

( children, obey your parents iu the Lord ; 

J for this is right. Kph. G: 1. 

D elight thyself also in the Lord ; and he J 
shall give thee the desires of thy heart. | 
Ps. 37 : 4. 

E nter not into the path of the wicked, and 
go uot in the way of evil men. Prov.4:l4. 

F rom a child thou hast known the holy 
Scriptures, which arc able to make thee 
wise unto salvation through faith which is 
i in Christ Jesus. 2 Tim. 3: 15. 
flood understanding giveth favor; but the 
U way of the transgressors is hard. Prov. 
13:15. 


way? by taking heed thereto according 


Ps. 119:9. 


W 

to thy word. 

K V cept ye be converted, and become a.-> 
A little children, ye shall not enter into 
the kingdom of heaven. Matt. IS : .3. 

\ J q children, hearken unto me: l will teui h 
I you the fear of the Lord. Ps. 34 : 1 1 . 

r 7loi\ said, The Lord hath forsaken me, aim 
’ J mv Lord hath forgotten me. Can a v - 

•L « 1 • 1 •! 1 ‘J , \ r ih..,* 


z ., _ 

man forget her sucking child? Yea, they 
may forget, yet will f not forget *’ 


th 


Isa. 40 : 14, 1 5. 


H onor thy father and thy mother; that thy 
days may be long upon the land which 
the Lord thy God giveth thee. Ex- 20 : 12. 
T love them that love me, and those that 
1 seek me early shall find me. Prov. 8: 17. 
Tesus called them unto him and said, Suffer 
*' little child reu to come unto me, and for- 


Letters from the Children. 

1 

Dear Brother Henry, by the will of tju 
Lord 1 am spared to write to you again, i L‘ 

' Lord is very good to us all ; then ought v>‘ 
not love and obey him, and keep his 
commandments, so that we can go to heaven 
when we die? We are all poor sinners in 
this world, in this vale of tears ; but Jcsn- 
Christ died on the cro s for sinners, and we 
can all be freely forgiven, if we go to him 
with a penitent heart. I have not forgotten 
the good advice you gave me, and 1 often 
think of you. 



HERALD OF TEETH. 


We are a little pilgrim band, 

Guided by our Savior’s hand ; v 

Soon we’ll reach our Father’s land, 

No more to roam. ‘ 

Belleville, Fa. Mary Yoder. 

Willie E Zierlein of Tiskilwa, 111., writes ! 
a few lines, and says lie likes the Herald 
very well, and also reads in the Tesament. 

He says he would like to have me visit 
them, which I should like to do, but cannot * 
make any promise at this time. 

# 

Manners. 

“Do unto others as you would have 
them do unto you.” 

Some little boys and girls think 
it matters little what they say or 
do to strangers. 

They are very polite and civil 
to acquaintances, but forget their 
manners when addressing others. 
This is quite wrong. Every per- 
son has rights which the true, gen- 
tleman always recognizes. Civili- 
ty always requires us to avoid that 
which is displeasing to others. It 
is not manly to pass a person on 
the street without giving, him an 
opportunity of recognizing you. 
Manners demand of every one to 
notice friend or stranger with a : 
pleasant word or some sign of rec- 
ognition. How often the burden- 
ed heart might be relieved of its 
load, if a kind word were spoken 
at the right time. Then again 
some will be all smiles and favors, 
among friends and strangers, but 
very unmannerly at home. The 
-Bible teaches us that we should ev- 
er prefer the honor of others to our 
own. If we observe the teachings of 
Christ, we find them characterized 
by love ; and he that is guided by 
it will always be civil, polite and 
agreeable, for love worketli no ill 
to its neighbor. IT 

Troon FOR THE LaiBS/ 

I I 1 

Show me thy way s,0 Lord ; 

teach me thy paths. Lead 
me in thy truth, and teach 
I me, for thou art the God of ’ 

: my salvation. Ps. 25 : 4, 5. ■ 
Wash me, and I shall be 
whiter than snow. Ps. 51 : 7. j 


The following Table will show those who 
wish to read the Testament in the way pro- 
posed what chapter to read each day. 


Days. 

Chapter. 

Days. 

Chapter. 

May 

16 

2 Thes. 

o 

w 

June 

1 

Ileb. 

1 

CC 

17 

U 

3 

<c 

O 

ii 

2 

u 

IS 

1 Tim. 

1 

.tC- 

• > 
o 

i i 

3 

cc 

19 

U 

2 

ll 

4 

ii 

4 

cc 

20 

a 

o 

u 

cc 

5 

U 

5 

cc 

21 

a 

4 

it 

0 

it 

G 

cc 

22 

u 

5 

cc 

i 

ii 

1 

cc 

23 

a 

G 

ii 

s 

ii 

8 

cc 

24 

2 Tiui. 

1 

u 

9 

i i 

9 

u 

25 

ii 

o 

a 

10 

CC 

10 

u 

2G 

*1 

O 

O 

a 

1 1 

a 

11 

u 

2 7 

cc 

4 

.it 

12 

cc 

12 

tc 

28 

Titus 

1 

a 

13 


13 

cc 

29 

Cl 

o 

U 

14 

Jam. 

1 

a 

30 

it 

o 

o 

u 

15 

U 

9 

it 

31 

Phil. 

1 

a 

1(> 

Ci 

»i 

O 


This table can be written on a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

QUESTIONS. 

1 Iu the 1 l th chapter in the Book of lsa- 
i:dk. we read. “ 1 lie wolf also shall dwell with 
the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with 
the kid; and the calf and the young lion 
and the falling together ; and a little child 
shall lead them.” What meant the Prophet 
by this saying ? 

2 Whom did the Savior mean, when he 
said, “All that ever came before me are 
thieves aud robbers.” ? 

3 Matt- 12 : 43, reads, “When the un- 
clean spirit is gone out of a man, lie. walk- 
eth in dry places seeking rest, and findeth 
none.” 

What are these dry places ? 

4 In Genesis 1 : 2G, wo read, “God said, 
Let us make. man in our image, alter our 
likeness.” 

In what did man have the image of t.ud. 
j An answer through thellcrald is requested 

For tiie IloralJ of Truth. 

Reading the Scriptures Is like travel- 
ing. 


minds; hence the necessity of a continuous 
examination of the Holy Scriptures, lbi. 
“All Scripture is given by inspiration ot 
God, and is profitable for doctrine, for re- 
proof, for correction, for instruction in right- 
eousness.” 

If we read the Scripture verse after verse, 
we can learn many things that have hap- 
pened, and that will occur, but a great 
number of people do not believe it. Num- 
bers profess to believe it with their mouth, 
but with their hearts they deny it. The 
Scriptures inform us of but two ways, and 
on one of them we are traveling. Jesus 
says, “ Enter ye in at the strait gate; for 
wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that 
leadeth to destruction, and many there be 
which go in thereat : Because strait is the 
gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth 
unto life, and few there be that find it.” 
Are we on the narrow way of life, or on the 
broad way to destruction ? Should wo not 
be busily engaged in searching the Script- 
ures, which arc left for our guide? Jesus 
savs, “ 1 am the way, the truth, and the life; 
mi man comcth unto the Father, but by me 

Is it not terrible to think that there are 
in the world so many millions of people, 
ami yet only a few who find the narrow way 
of bib, while all the others go down to des- 
truction? The Scriptures tell us of a rich 
man that was clothed in purple and tine lin- 
en, and fared sumptuously every day, and in 
hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torment; 
he cried for mercy, saying lie was torment- 
ed in this flame ; but there was no mercy for 
him beyond the grave. 

Dear friends, who are those that are iu 
the way to destruction? Is it some persous 
we do not know, or is it you or me, or our 
neighbors, friends, brothers or sisters ? Oh 
let us think how near we may be to the end 
of our journey ; hence the necessity fit striv- 
. i n ._r to be on the narrow way, so that when 
W( f are called from time to eternity, we may 
hear the welcome words, “Well done, thou 
good and faithful servant; thou hast been 
laitbful over a few things, I will make the 
ruler over many things : enter thou into 1 1 1 o 
jov of thy Lord.” 

A. M. B DOSSER 


Dear readers, I have been a constant, 
reader of the Herald for five years past ; T 
have also read iu many other papers, and 1 
find none of them so interesting and instruct- 
ive as the Herald ; but we should not think 
too highly of it, lest, we put our (rust there- 
on ; but let us put our trust on God alone, 
and not on bis gifts, or we will be deceived. 
•Blessed is the man that trusteth in the 
Lord, and whose hope the Lord is,” Jer. 17:7. 

While traveling, and on my return the 
V, Y. I noticed many things which 1 
saw when I first passed, but which would 
have been forgotten, had they not again 
come before me. This brought to my mind 
that reading the Scriptures is like traveling. 
Every time we read them, new ideas present 
themselves, and new thoughts arise in our I 


For t lie Iloruld of Truth. 

Sinner, Consider what You are Doing. 

Sinner, consider what you are doing, and 
whom you are serving. While you are living 
in rebellion against God you are serving 
Satan; you are traveling on the way to 
ruiu. O turn, repent, come to .Tesus, and 
lie will redeem you. lie will redeem all 
those who come to him. “ The Spirit and 
the Bride say, Come. And let him that hear- 
eth say. Conic. And lot him that is a’hir-t 
I 1 , iiio. .V i id whosoever will lot him take 
the water of life freely.” 

Do you not desire to have Jesus reign 
within you? \\ ould you not love to have 
such a precious friend as the Savior ? Jesus 
is the friend of sinners ; he died for them 
Can you still despise him who suffered so 


HEK/A.L3D OS’ TBTJTH. 


mueh for you? You do not believe him or | 
you would not disobey him. 

O what folly it is to serve Satan, the ene- 
my of all that is good ! Does it not alarm 
you to think that you are in the service of 
vour worst enemy ? You are in bondage 
under him. Do you not wish to be free 
from that bondage? O why be a slave to 
Satan, when salvation is offered so freely to 
all ? Come to Jesus, for there is salvation in 
no other. 

Perhaps you think you can have no enjoy- 
ment in this world if you become a Christian ; , 
but you can have uo pure happiness, no 
real enjoyment outside of Jesus. Without j 
him you are in danger of eternal death, j 
Repent and be converted, that your sins may 
he blotted out- Lay aside the vanities and . 
perishable enjoyments of the world. Why j 
put off repentance any longer? Why not 
turn in with the overtures of mercy, and 
exert your influence for good ? 

The Savior says, “ lie that gathcreth not ; 
. . Ja me scattereth abroad.” You must be 
born again, before you have the promise of I 
eternal life. You are yet in the kingdom 
of darkness, hut you must be transplanted 
from that kingdom into the kingdom of 
Christ. When Jesus knocks at the door 
of your hearts, () receive him. If he with- 
draw from you, you will be forever lost. \ou 
con do nothing of yourself. “ Every good 
<rift and every perfect gift is from above, and 
cometh down from the Father of lights.” If 
you receive the Savior, he will give you the 
power to become his children. We arc 
poor, weak mortals, and of ourselves can do 
nothing that is good ; hut to him that asks, 
the promise is, that he shall receive ; and to 
him that knocketh it shall be opened. The 
invitation from the Savior is, “Come unto 
me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, 
and I will give you rest. Take my yoke 
upon you, and learn of me : for I am meek 
and lowly in heart ; and you shall find rest 
unto your souls ; lor my yoke is easy, and 
my burden is light.” 

Maria Martin. 

Wakarusa, Iml. 

— — — m ' % m 

F«/r the IlerttM of Ti nth. 

FEAR NOT. 


sun to shine on the evil and the 
good. 

Again we are told by the inspired 
writers, that at the end of the light 
of this world or the twelve hours of 
the Lord’s day of our probation, 
The candle of the wicked shall be 
put out, then shall they stumble and 
fall to rise no more; but they shall 
be clasped in the .jaws of death 
where there shall he weeping and 
gnashing of teeth. Dear reader, if 
you still walk by the light of this 
world, and have no bright hope be- 
yond the grave, be persuaded to 
ground your carnal weapons, and 
I take up the cross and follow the 
Master who is not afraid to be 
stoned, for you do not know how 
soon the eleventh hour may be at 
hand, which is the latest hour 
granted for repentance. 

JOSEEII Git AVER. 


A Question. 


“Follow Thou Me.” 

Jn. 21 : 22. 

Have you looked for help in the desert ? 

For those who have missed their way ¥ 

Have you been in the wild, waste places, 
Where the lost and wandering stray? 

Have you trodden the lonely highway. 

The foul and darksome street? 

It may be you’d see in the gleaming, 

The print of the Savior’s feet. 

Have you folded home to your bosom, 

The trembling, neglected lamb? 

j And taught the little lost one, 

The sound of the shepherd’s name? 

Have you searched for the poor and needy. 
With no clothing, no home, no bread ? 

The Son of Man was among them, 

He had nowhere to lay' his head. 

Have ye carried the living water 
To the parched and thirsty soul? 

Have ye said to the sick and wounded, 
Christ Jesus makes thee whole? 

Have ye told my fainting children 
Of the strength of the father’s hand? 

i Have ye guided the tottering footstep 
To the shores of the golden land? 


••His disciples say unto him, j 
Master, the .Jews of late sought to j 
stone thee ; and goest thou thither 
a train ? Jesus answered, Are there j 
not twelve hours in a day? If any 
man walk in the day, he stumbleth 
not, because he seeth the light of 
this world,” Jn. 11 : 8, 0. 

Herein we can see that all the 
(lays of our natural life are as but 
one day, or twelve hours with our 
Savior and God; therefore the right- 
eous and the wicked are made to 
share alike in the gifts of this world, 
for God sendetli his rain on the just 
and on the unjust, and makes the 


Have ye stood by the sad and weary 
To smooth the pillow of death, 

To comfort the sorrow stricken, 

And strengthen the feeble faith? 

And have ye felt when the glory 

lias streamed through the open door, 

And flitted across the shadows, 

That 1 had been there before? 

Have yc wept with the broken hearted 
In their agony of woe? 

Ye might hear me whispering beside you, 
'Tis a pathway* I often go. 

My disciples, my friends, my brethren, 

Can ye dare to follow me? 

Then, wherever the Master dwelleth, 
There shall the servant be. 

Selected by W.M. II. VANPEI.T, Sen. 


Is a man always justifiable to do what hi 
conscience allows him ? Not by any mean?, 
because a man’s conscience may become 
perverted that it will permit him to commit 
the grossest sins. Education too has much 
to do with the conscience, so that unless di- 
rected by the unerring counsel of God’- 
word it will be unsafe to depend upon eon- 
science alone for a guide to that which - 
right and acceptable to God. 

Conscience cannot properly he called s 
guide in our view of the matter, yet a c >r- 
science directed by the Word, and ltd by 
the Spirit will reprove the wrong and ap- 
prove the right ; in other words, it will de- 
cide between that which is right and wrong 
I when properly educated, trained and obeyed 
A man is justifiable in paying his debt? 
upon the time lie agrees to pay them, and 
he is not bound to pay them any sooner tha: 
he has agreed to do so. Hut when he set- 
his creditor in great need and can reason- 
ably pay sooner, he should do so. The great 
law of love, Do unto others, as ye would tha* 
they should do unto you, is always a go 1 
guide in such matters. 

Under no circumstances should a man 
tell to anybody what he docs not l>elieve t 
be true. This is decidedly wrong. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

What shall we do with the Charit) 
Funds? 

“To <lo good and to communicate for 
get not; for with such sacrifice G 
is well pleased,” Heb. 13: 10. 

In some localities our church is so blessed 
in a worldly point of view that no menibe- 
depend upon it for support. Hence the 
. question arises (directly or indirectly), “ W hr 
shall we do with the charity funds - 
Sometimes they are used for purposes of les 
importance than charity. 

Though money under no circumstance 
so sacred that its use for any good purpo 
jlfTwrong, yet we as a church are never 
equally favored, that its exclusive use in i 
cause for which it should he contributed : 
improper. If there are no members atnon 
us who necessarily depend upon the chur 
for support, there are always some of limite 
means who deserve an appropriation fr 
our overplus. 

Let us cultivate the spirit of charity win-, 
prevailed among the primitive Christian- 
and we will certainly find ample room for a. 
our accumulating funds, without using tie 
for other purposes. * , 


1872 ± ±±L± 

bloom comes down in little drops. £ 
The great ocean is made up of drops e 
of water; the ocean-beach that a 
holds the great waters in their place i 
is made of little sands. The grade i 
of the great Pacific Railroad, over ] 
which millions of people will travel, 
was made, one little shovelful at a 

time. , , ^ 

Go forth then to labor, and by 

little deeds rather than heroic 
ones make your life sublime. Com- 
fort the sorrowing, seek out the 
poor, and relieve their wants— re- 
claim the inebriate, dry up the or- 
phan’s tears, visit the afflicted, shed 
here a tear of sympathy, and there 
a tear of joy. Sing a song, offer a 
prayer, speak a word, cast a smile 
to cheer some desponding heart. 

The Savior will despise none of 
those little deeds. Even a cup of 
cold water given to one of earth’s 
sorrowing children will not be for- 
gotten. 

Great will he your reward. In 
the day of reckoning, when the little 
and great deeds shall be weighed, 
when the improved and unimproved I 
opportunites shall pass in review, 
then will Jesus say, “Come,yebless- 
ed of my father, inherit the kingdom 
prepared for you from the founda- 
tion of the world*, for I was a hun- 
gered, and ye gave me meat: I was 
thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I 
was a stranger and ye took me in: 
naked, and ye clothed me: I was 
sick, and ye visited me: I was in 
prison, and ye came unto . me. 
Come then, enter with me into the 
joy of thy Lord, and heaven shall 
he yours forever. “Inasmuch as 
ye have done it unto one of the 
least of these my brethren, ye have 
done it unto me." — Methodist. 


A^XjTD of truth. 


Acts that Tell. 

If you wait for opportunities t> 
do great things, you may never a 
complish anything. The rain tha' 
falls upon the earth and makes tin* 
i grass to grow and the tlowers t< 


[The following appropriate remarks, on 
** Songs and their Writers,” wc find in ^the 
Musical Million and fireside Friend, for l*eb- 
ruary. They contain too much truth, and 
the matter should be well looked after by 
all who have any thing to do with Sabbath 
Schools. In asmueh as many of our people 
arc organizing Sabbath Schools in their 
churches, let them see to it carefully that 
only appropriate church music, inculcating 
srnmd doctrine , is used in the Schools, otlici- 
wisc it may do more evil than good. fd.~\ 

Songs and Song Writers. 

Just now there seems to be an 
alarming mania among song writers 
to work up Golden Gates Beauti- 
ful rivers, — Golden Plains, Beau- 
tiful Trees and Flowers —and Ever- 


green Hills— into some sort of po- 
etic furniture, which the music-men 
varnish up by adding a chorus 
in which are strangely mixed 
up “Sweet by-and-by,” — “Happy 
Home,”— Beautiful hereafter,”— and 
“ Over There.” 

Some of these songs contain pret- 
ty ideas, but unfortunately, so 
many of them are unscriptural, and 
we think, are unworthy of the 
place they claim, i. e. the Sunday 
school. The light, diddling, fid- 
dling, dance-music to which they 
are not unfrequently adapted, does 
not very much commend them to 
the service of the sanctuary . 

AVe know one author, whose Sun- 
day School hymns and music are 
used extensively, who makes no 
’ pretentions to Christianity, and 
‘ yet Sunday Schools seize upon them 
with avidity. “ Can a fountain send 
forth both bitter and sweet water?” 
In looking over some recent books 
i we have been driven to the condu- 
i sion that their authors have com- 
, piled them with the special object 
. to please the natural heart and se- 
, cure large sales, without once tak- 

- ing into account the result, for good 
i or evil, upon the hearts of the chil- 

- dren. . 

A loose materialism, with a Ma- 
s hometan paradise pervades Sab- 

I bath School songs now-a-days, 

: quite as much as “ golden curls,”— 
s “sparkling eyes,” — “ruby lips,’ 

n “gentle star-beams, ” — “ silvery 

- moons,” — “weeping willows,” and 
3 “ bleeding hearts,” designates some 

II hapless lover’s sentimental rhym- 
s ing. 

e Look to your Sahbatli School 
e Music-books, if you would impress 
saving, gospel truths upon the 
young hearts, and sow good seed 
by the way. Examine the hymns— 
ic for a hymn committed to memory 
b- in childhood lingers with us through 
id the paths of life, and if correct in 
>y sentiment will accomplish good; if 
tb false in doctrine, it will, neverthe- 
'l e less, haunt the memory of the child 
dr anc \ the man, making bitter the 

^ mouth. 

3r * For tho llornli! of Truth. 

i I must die. 

1 am young but I must die, 
lu my grave I soon shall lie ; 

Am L ready now to go, 

H* the will of’ God be so ? 

lu- Lord, prepare me for my eud, 

er- To my heart thy Spirit send; 


Help me Jesus thee to love, 

Take my soul to heaven above. 

There I shall with Jesus be, 

There l shall my Savior see, 

Nevermore to suffer pain, 

Nevermore to sin again. 

^ • -^i 

Children, love one another. 

Children, do you love each other ? 

Arc you always kind and true? 

Do you always do to others 

As you’d have them do to you ? 

Are you gentle to each other ? 

Are you earef’uhday by day , 

Not to give offense by actions, 

Or by any thing you say ? 

Little children, love each other, 

Never give another pain ; 

If your brother speaks in anger. 

Answer not in wrath agaiu. 

He not selfish to each other, 

Never spoil another’s rest; 

Strive to make each other happy, 

And you will yourselves be blest. 

■ 

Earthquake in Syria. 

A telegram from Constantinople, Turkey, 
brings the intelligence that the city of An- 
tioch, the ancient capital of Syria, has been 
visited by an earthquake, causing a terrible 
loss of life. The dispatch states that one 
half of the city was totally destroyed, and 
1 ,500 persons lost their lives. 

Antioch is situated on the left hank of 
the Orontes river, about twenty miles from 
its mouth. It was founded about 300 years 
before the Christian era, by Silencus Nicotor, 
who named it in honor of Antioehus, his 
father, a general under Philip of Maccdon. 

It once had 400, 000 inhabitants, and Chrys- 
ostom says that, in his time, 200,000 souls 
were within its wall. It was in this city 
that the followers of Christ were first called 
Christians, and at one time one halt of the 
population bore that name, but now though 
there are a dozen mosques, there is not one 
Christian church. The city walls, a ruined 
aqueduct, and a portion of pavement are 
all the remaining vestiges of the former 
splendor of the city. 1 1 now has only about 
10,000 inhabitants, and the number is being 
constantly diminished by earthquakes and 
pestilences. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Do Good. 

L have been a constant reader of the IL r- 
1 aid from its first issue ; and I think that 
j an y one so disposed can find many articles 
therein that are edifying and instructive, 
and receive a fund of knowledge that will 
he a comfort to him in the hour of death. 

I might extend this, hut we cannot all 
write as we would desire. Nevertheless 


HERALD OIF 1 TBTJTH. 




we can all be peace-makers, and thus do | 
good. “Blessed are the peace-makers ; for 
they shall be called the children of God.” 
AVe hail the Herald as a messenger of good. 
|,et us heed its solemn admonitions, and sec 
that our own hearts foster not evil. May 
the Creator of all things lead us unto all 
.rood. J. B. McConnell. 

Jjf/iij Jjfine, Dallas Co., Mo. 

For tlio Herattl of Truth. 

The Righteous are Bold. 

“The wicked fleeth when uo 
man pursueth; hut the righteous 
are bold as a lion,” I'rov. 28: 1. 

When we meet with a man in his 
wicked or sinful works, and en- 
deavor to persuade him to break ofl 
from them, very often he will reply 
with abusive language and will tell 
ns lie wants none of our preaching; 
but mark him, as soon as he can get 
away from the righteous man lie 
will ilee as if a serpent had bitten 
him, while the righteous man stands 
ns bold as a lion, vindicating his 
glorious cause in Christ Jesus.. 

“ Evil men understand not judg- 
ment; but they that seek the Lord 
understand all tilings." God has 
declared unto man that his Spirit 
will not always strive with man, 
therefore when the evil man goes on 
in his evil habits provoking Hie 
most high God daily, God will cease 
to strive with him; for the Lord 
says he will take from him that hath 
not, even all that he hath, and give to 
him that hath already, that he may 
have more abundantly. Hence the 
righteous will understand all things. 

How blest the righteous when lie dies, 
When sinks a weary soul to rest; 

How mildly beaut the closing eyes, 

How gently heaves tlT cxpirii gbre; st 

ro fades a summer cloud away, 

So binks the gale when storms arc o'er; 

JSo gently shuts the eye of day, 

So dies a wave along the shore. 

JOSEI’II GltAVF.lt. 

^ 9 

Our Responsibility. 


Beloved readers, Duty and love 
press me to write a few lines to 
impress upon us the duty and re- 
sponsibility which rests upon us as 
travelers to a long and never end- 1 
ing eternity, and to admonish us to 
look at onr past, lives and see what 
our condition is in this present: 
world. If we look around us we] 
see that another year is past, and 
it is natural for us to settle up our , 
old accounts with the old year, so 1 


that we know how our business lias 
prospered during the past year. 
Now this is a wise plan and should 
be observed by all who work to 
prosper in their business. But 
here T would ask the question, IIow 
does our account stand between us 
and onr God? Are we also ready to 
look at this account, and see wheth- 
er we are able to balance it, or not? 

I feel safe in saying that many of 
the readers of the Herald are pre- 
pared to balance their accounts and 
have a balance left them yet. But 
here we will stop and consider our 
life account, ifthe samewas present- 
ed before us, would we be able to 
balance it? We do not know what 
time we shall be called upon to give 
an account of our stewardship, 
and then the iinal settlement will 
come. I would here ask each of us, 
are we prepared to make that final 
settlement, which we all have to 
make sooner or later? 

But here one might ask, What is 
that account to which you refer? 

I will try to explain it to you as 
well as 1 can, but! feel too unworthy 
to give it such an explanation as is 
due to it. But now let me ask the 
question. Who is it that provides 
for us? Is it not our heavenly Fa- 
ther who provides for us, and who 
watches, over us by day and by 
night? and for what purpose? 1 
suppose we would all answer, For 
the reason that we should love and 
serve him. But what is the service 
he asks of us? The first command 
to us is, repent, believe and be bap- 
tized, or in other words, Labor in 
my vineyard. But what is the la- 
bor we shall perform here? 1 must 
confess I cannot describe if, but 1 
hope 1 can describe so much of it 
that we can see that we are all more 
iu debt than we are able to pay. 
But here the question arises, What 
shall we do if we cannot pay ? Here 
we have an example in God’s word 
in the man who owed ten thousand 
pounds and was not able to pay. 
The command was, Sell him and all 
, that lie hath to make the payment, 

, but the servant fell down before bis 
. master and plead for mercy, and he 
; released him, and the debt lie re- 
. j leased also. Now as we have clos- 
, ed another year, let us :ilso look to 
[ onr accounts and try to balance 

I I them, or in other words have the 
. account canceled and begin with 
1 fresh courage on theNew Year with 
f more care and watchfulness. 

) I 1). S. II. 


I*m lonely since my Mother died. 

I’m lonely since my mother died, 

Though friends and kindred gather near 
I cannot check the rising sigh, 

Nor stay the heart-felt, silent tear. 

Of earthly friends she was the best, 

My erring, youthful steps to guide, 

Oli ! do not smile because I weep, 

I'm lonely since my mother died. 

CHORUS. 

I'm lonely since my mother died, 

Though friends and kindred gather near 
I cannot check the rising sigh, 

Nor stay the heart-felt, silent tear. 

You may not deem it brave or strong 
To let these tears so often flow ; 

But those who’ve lost a mother dear 
Can tell the pain of my sad woe. 

Could I but call her back again, 

And kneel once more down by her side, 

I’d love her better than before ; 

I'm lonely since my mother died. 

Oh 1 yon who have a mother dear, 

Let not one word or act give pain, 

But cherish, love her, with your life ; 

You ne’er can have her back again ; 

But when she’s called from you away, 

Across death’s dark and troubled tide, 
Willi me in pain you need not say, 

I'm lonely since my mother died. 

Selected, 


JtliUTtfb. 


On the 18th of April, in Putnam county, Ohio, 
by J, M. Brenneman, Brother David D. Diller lo 
Sister Sits anna Hoffstetlcr. 


Hr 


Correction. — In the notice of the death of 
Louisa Stecklcy, in the March number, it should 
be -Tan. 1st, instead of Feb. 1st. Sermon by Elder 
Tatton, not Fatton. 

On the 10th of Nov., in Perry co., Ohio, Bro. 
Samuel Beery, aged f>9 yrs., 9 mos., and 17 days 
Buried (he 21st, at Beery’s church, lie was sick 
but four days, during which time his sufferings 
were very severe. He leaves a widow, 9 children, 
and 24 grand-children to mourn the loss of a kind 
husband and beloved father. Sermon in German, 
by Jacob Bowman; in English by C. C. Beery, 
and J. Good, from Job 14 : 14. He was a faithful 
member of the Mennonite church for 39 years. 

A day or two before his death, the physician 
said to him, “Father Beery, your threescore 
years and ten have nearly' fled ; are you willing 
to go?” His reply was, death cannot come too 
soon, I am ready. Bro. Beery was highly esteem 
dd by all who knew him. S. S. Goon. 

On the 28th of Feb., in Markham, York eo., 
Out., Joseph Burkholder, in the 72nd year of his 
ago. Buried in Weidman's grave yard. lie at 
tended church regularly, as long as he was able. 

D. L. Huber. 

tin t he 2flth of J an., in Aldhrnngh township. 
Elgin co., Out., Barbara Albright, aged about 
years. She was a member of the Mennonite 
church. 

On the 25th of Feb., in Lancaster co., Pa., of 
Consumption, Barbara Peters, aged 84 yrs., 1 
mouth, and 14 days. She was a widow over 23 
years, and leaves 6 children, 17 grand-children. 


TTTnT? . A T.T1 OTP T^TTTZEdl. 


•’3 great grand-children,- and 2 great.great-grand- Sept., 1871, Henry S. Gabel, aged 77 years, 4 mos. 
Children. A funeral discourse was delivered for and 28 days. 

the benefit of her children and grand children On the 19th of Jan., in Lagrange co., lud., of 
; Indiana in Yellow Creek Meeting-house, in Small Pox, Abner, aged 7 yrs., 8 mos., 11 days; 
Vlkhart co.', on the 31st of March. and Feb. 25th Benjamin F., aged 12 yrs., 4 mo., 

On the 11th of March, in Markham, York co., and 4 days, children of Samuel and Catherine 

1 a i • r 1 „ it „ 1 n.L KaBI Anvil 7 th intlif* Amitth 


()nt 0 f heart disease, John Dohner, member of Erb. Funeral Services held April 7th, in the Amish 
the Hiver Brethren church, aged 71 yrs. and 2 Mennonite Church on the Hawpatch, by Isaac 
,1 tys. Buried on the 13th in Keisy’s Hill bury- Schmucker iu German from Rev. 21: 4, and by 
ine-ground. Services in German and English D. Brenneman in English, from Jer. 22:10- 
from Phil. 1 : 21, ‘‘For to me to live is Christ Although the ways of the Lord sometimes ap- 
. lU d to die is gain.” pear to us mysterious, let it suffice that we are 


On the 12th of March, in New Galena, Bucks 
co - Pa., John Detweiler , aged 73 yrs. and 5 days. 
Buried on the 15th, followed by a large concourse 
of friends and relatives. He was buried at Line 
Lexington Meeting-house. Funeral services by 
Isaac Overholt and Abm. Moyer, in German, and 
J M. Ilaldeman in the English language. 

On 'ho 21st of March, in Somerset co., Pa., 
Itro. David Blouyh, at the advanced age of 82 
vrs., 8 mos., and 13 days. Buried the 23rd, in 
ilie presence of' a large concourse of relatives and 
friends. He was married four times, and was 
the father of 17 children, 68 grand children, and 
H7 great-grand-childrcn — in all, 172 souls. Serv- 
ices by Bishop Samuel Blough and the writer. 

“ How blest is our brother, bereft 
Of all that can burden his mind ; 

How easy the soul that has left 
This ivearisome body behind.” 

Samuel Bi.ougii. 

Ou 1 ho 26th of March, in Augusta co., Vn., 
bro. George Coley, aged 4J yrs. and 20 days. He 
had been afflicted for ten or twelve years with 
Consumption. lie bore bis affliction with much 
patience ami Christian resignation. He was 
buried on the 28th iu the presence of a large 
concourse of frieuds. He leaves a wife and 3 
children to mourn their loss, but we hope then- 
loss is his great gain. Funeral discourse by the 
writer from 1 Cor. 15 : 55 — 58. 

Jacob Hildebrand. 

On the 7th of April, in Jamestown, Elkhart 

co., Ind., Calvin Vincent, son of James and — 

MeCraner, aged 7 mos. and 9 days. Funeral dis- 
course by J. F. Funk, from James 4 : 14. Jesus 
gathers the little lambs into his bosom and car- 
ries them gently there. 

On the 7th of April, in Jamestown, Elkhart 
co,. Iud., of protracted illness, William Johnston, 
aged 39 yrs., 5 mos., and 20 days. Buried on 
the 8th. Funeral discourse by J. E. Fuuk. He 
leaves a wife and four children to mourn his de- 
parture. God will temper the wind to the shorn 
lamb. 

On the Bih of April, in Somerset co.. Pa., 
Samuel Voder , aged 08 yrs., 8 1110s., and 6 days. 

lie was a member of the Amish Mennonite 
Church. Funeral discourse by George Sehrock. 

Benedict Yoder. 

On the 9th of April, in Raiuliam township, 
Ont., of Erysipelas, of which he suffered about a 
week, Bro. Jacob Hoover, aged 66 yrs. and 28 
days. Buried on the 12th. Funeral discourses 
by Abm. Wenger, John Lapp (of Erie co., N. 1 .), 
and J. F. Funk, from Ps. 103 : 14—10, and Ileb. 
13 ; 7 — 10, lie was a deacon in the church for 
about 34 years, and a faithful labbrer in the 
Lord’s vineyard. lie leaves, a wite.aud 11 chil- 
dren to mourn their loss. During his illness, his 
great anxiety seemed to be for the welfare ot his 
children, that they might also seek their salvation 
in the accepted time, and to this end lie exhorted 
them earnestly as long us he was able to speak. 
We hope his counsels will not be unheeded. lie 
died with a confident hope in the merits ol C hrist. 

On the 12th of March, in Skippackville, Mont- 
gomery co., Pa., at the residence ot G. G. ltoscn- 
herry, after a short illness of typhoid tever, 
Mary llemlrieks, widow, aged 70 yrs., 3 mos., and 
2 days. Buried on the Pith, in the Towamcncin 
grnve-yard. Services at the house by J Allcbach, 
and at the meeting-house by II. S. Bower. 

In Montgomery co., Pa., on the llth d • of 


Schmucker in German from Rev. 21: 4, and by 
D. Brenneman in English, from Jer. 22:1(). 

Although the ways of the Lord sometimes ap- 
pear to us mysterious, let it suffice that we are 
assured, that “all things work together for good 
to them that love God. The mourning friends will 
yield themselves in meek submission to the man- 
date of him who doeth all things well. They do 
not mourn as those having no hope. 

Oh, friends no longer weep, 

Nor shed your tears in vain.; 

Your loved and dear ones only sleep 
And soon will rise again. 

Yes rise to joys unknown, 

Unseen by mortal eyes; 

They each shall wear a glorious cruwu 
And rest in Paradise. 

The Lord will take them home 
To dwell with him above; 

No longer then you need bemoan 
The objects of your love. 

On the 14th of April, in Eric co , N, Y.. of 
Brain-fever, George S nearly, aged 65 yrs ,4 mos., 
and 7 days. Funeral services by John Lapp, from | 
Mark 13-33, in german, and by Daniei Brenne- 
man in english from Job. 14: 14. 

The deceased leaves a wife and two sons to 
mourn his unexpected departure. May God bless 
the mourning friends. May the dear Bister, 
though conscious of the fact, that a two fold re- 
sponsibility now rests upon her in the lonely hours 
c f her widowhood, rest upon the arm of Jesus, by 
whose grace she will be sustained and upheld. 
May God bless and protect the fatherless chil- 
dren. 

On the 5th of April, near Richfield, Snyder co., 
Fa., Elizabeth, wife of Manuel Page. Her maiden 
name was Bearer, aged 29 years, 4 mos , 2 days. 
Her sufferings were not long but severe. She 
leaves a husband and one child to mourn their 
loss. Her funeral was largely attended, she was ^ 
buried on the 7th at Shelley’s burying-ground. 
Funeral discourse by Thomas, William and Chris- 
tian Graybill, from Rev. 14 : 13. 

On the 2t)th of March, in Fulton co.. Ohio, 

, son of Joseph and Mngdeleua Nafsiger, 

aged a little over one year. Sermon hy N, King. 

On the 21th of March iu Fulton co., O., of the 
infirmities of age, Catherine., wife of David Stuts- 
man, aged 81 yrs., 9 mos., and 2 days. She left 9 
children, 49 grand, and 24 great-grandchildren. 
She was buried the 27 1 It in the presence of a 
great number of people. Sermon by Joseph Weis 
andN. King. I. F. Nafziuer. 

On the 4th of April iu Cambria co., Pa., Mag- 
dclana Rewerin , at the advanced age of 101 years, 
9 mos,, and 19 days. Her maiden name was Kauf- 
mauu. Site was confined to her bed about eigh- 
teen months, but she was able to sit up in bed, 
until the last few days ; in her humlrotb year 
slie walked in one day to one of her grand-chil- 
dren, a distance of over 7 miles. Although her 
hearing and sight were poor, yet she conversed 
readily in her great age. It was her ardent de- 
sire for many years to leave this world, yet she 
bore all with patience, until her Redeemer took 
her home. She was a sister in Amish Mennonite 
Church. Discourses hy M. B. Miller and Jona- 
than Hershberger, from Lev. 19:32. 

On the 6lh of April, in Lee eo., Iowa, Anna 
Forbentwall, widow, aged 90 yrs., buried t lie 8!h 
iu the presence of many relatives and friends. 
Her intellect remained until the last. She was 
born iu Alsace, France, came to America in 1817, 
and was a firm, faithful sister in t lie Amish Men- 
nonite Church about 70 years. Services in ger- 


man by Bro. Schantz, and in english by J. For- 
kensen, from ltev. 14; 12, 13. 

On the 7th of April, in New Britain, Bucks co., 
Pa., Abraham llalderman, aged 86 yrs , and 9 days. 
Buried at Doylestown. Services by A. J. Hast- 
ings and J. M. Huldernian. 

On the 10th of April, iu Now Britain, Bucks 
co., Mary Swnrtleg, widow, aged 76 yrs., 6 mos., 
and 1 day. Buried at Lino Lexington. Services 
by S. Leatherman, J. M. Ilaldeman. 

On the 31st of March, in New Briftiin Bucks 
co.. Pa., Elisabeth Moyer, widow, aged 74 yrs. 
Buried at Line Lczington. Services by J. M. 
Ilaldeman and Sam. Godschalk. 


00 

etters ilcrcibtb. 


Samuel Eshlenian, J Beeshy, J II Steckly, G 
Brenneman, Carl J van dor Smissen, It N Kratz, 
John P King, J D Guengerich, Chr Schncck 
Michael Kilmer, Moses B Miller, Jos G Dohner, 

N D Johnson, It N Kratz, Jacob Kilmer, U New- 
comer, J J Weaver. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — John Albrecht $1; Jos S Augsburger $1 25; 
Jacob K Andrews $1. 

B — lacob Boiler $2 35 : J II Basinger 35cts : 
Samuel Bryan $1 ; Sem Brubaker $2 10 ; David 
Burkey $5 25; Henry B Burkholder $5 15; Abm 
B Brubacher $14 25 ; John Byler 36cts ; Chr 
Bruuk $1 ; Dr A L W Bowers $1 ; Jacob Bren- 
neman $1 ; John llowder $4 50 ; Joseph Belsley 
$1 ; J F Bush $1 ; George Beery 60cts ; Henry 
Buck waiter $6 44; Jacob Burkey $1 ; Peter 
Bachman $2. 

C — Elias Cassel $3 ; Henry Clymer $2. 

E Mrs M A Eslileman $3 25 ; Benj Egl.v $5. 

F — George Fox $1 ; Rev A J Fretz 50cts. 

G — Jacob Gerig lOcts; Sarah Groff $1 10; 
Peter M Gerber $3 25 ; S B Gerber $L 25 ; Benj 
Gerig $3; Henry Garber $1 ; Daniel Grieser $1; 
Eli Gashaw 25ets ; Jacob G Gabel S3 10 ; Chr 
Geiger lOcts ; Jos Gotwals $2 ; Samuel Gindels- 
perger $1. 

11 Chr Herr SOcts ; S S Hartzler 50cls ; J M 

Ilaldeman $6 ; J M Herr $10 ; Daniel llaug 10 
cts : Amos llershey & Bro $14 70 ; J C Hunsick- 
er $1 ; J Y Hartzler. $2 50 ; Ann Hedrick $1 ; 
Joseph Huber $1 ; S S Hartzler $1 ; Amns Huns- 
berger $1 : Samuel Hess $1 50; Lewis C Hensler 
$4 ; Joseph lie! ninth $1 25 ; A Z Hartzler 30cts; 

A Hunspcrger $1 40 ; Ann Hendricks $1 ; Cath- 
arine Hastings $1; Magdalena J Hays 65 cts ; 
John W Hays lOcts. 

J — N Johnson $1. 

K Peter Kr eh Well l 2-‘ct.s ; -I ac.oh Kilmer $2 ; 

Isaac Kulp $1 ; E Kratz $3 ; S B Kenaga lOcts ; 

J C Kenaga •$’'> 50 ; N II King $1 7<> : John R 

Kreider$l. . 

L Isaac W Longncre $f . t Fritz Lunger! $1; 

John Latshaw $1 ; Simeon Lnnfz $1 ; Franklin 
Landis 5()cts ; John J Lichli SI. 

M John Moyer lOcts ; John W Martin SI 50; 

Philip Meek $2 ; J J Marncr $2 50 ; Daniel 
Martin $1 50 ; John P Mast $3. 

N — Henry S Nisslev $2 50. 

R— Jacob llcsli $3 50 ; P Ronlet 50 ; Prof. A 
Rauschenbusch 9 cts ; H B Reist $1, your first 
letter with one dollar was received, but you for 
got to sign your name, was the reason you were 
not credited ; George Rupp $1 50. 

S— Mary Sehrock 5(1cts ; John Steen SI 00 ; 
E M Shellenberger $1 60: Samuel Stayrock $1 
j Joseph Schick $2 ;’ Lydia Stri- kler $1 ; Samuel 
K Stoltzfus 50ots : I lizabeth Shirk $1 ; Mattie 
G Slierk $1 : John P Speioher £ t 60. 

T — Levi D Trover $1. 

W — Anna Wenger $1 ; Sarah Aim Wiker $1 : 
A Weaver $1 ; Jacob D Weaver $1 75 : •• '1 
Weaver lOcts; A Hambold $1, lluiry L 'Wa- 
rner $1 ; Cumuel Weber 75cts. 



80 


OF TRUTH. 




Y— Cbr Yoder $1 5 0 ; David Yaggy $1 60 ; 
Reuben Yoder $2 ; Jonathan C Yoder $6*-0 5 

John Z Yoder $1 60. . I . 

y Henry Ziegler $1 60 ; Christian Zierlein 

SI 60 ; John Zook $2 60 ; Devi S Zook $1 65. 

Foa Books.— John F Rittenhouso $16 00; 
Jacob N Brubacher $50 00 ; C K Yoder $22 20 ; 
Chr Naffziger $23 20 ; Emanuel Suter $24 00 ; 
David Basinger $17 50 ; Christian II Hochstet- 

ler $4 50- 


p. M. 

9,65, p. m. 
1,10 A. M. 
11,15 A. M. 
2.30 p. m. 


TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

I’assenger trains on and after Apr. 1 1th, 18i2, 
leave Elkhart aa follows: 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) Ib^O, a. m. 

Special New York Expr., (Air Line) 1,10, 

Atlantic Express, ( A . ir T L . ine ) 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 

Mail, (Air Line) 

Grand Rapids, 

GOING WEST. 

Kt eoial Chicago Express sf, 4,-35 p. m. 

Night Eipr..», " 4 05 A M 

l'acifio Express, 4 V,t' M ' 

Accommodation , ’ ‘ ' 

Elkhart Accommodation, t»,uu a m 

Grand Rapids train arrives from White 1 lgeon 
at 1 05 p. m., and returns at 2,30 p. M. 

All trains run on Cleveland time which 
is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time, 
fig?" Sleeping cars on all night trams. 

Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. _ „ a , 

Cuaules Raise, Gen. Supt. 

C. Gbeese, Agent, Elkhart. 

Books for sale at this office* 

The following books are sent by mail, postage 
prepaid. 

The English Mknnonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mounonito Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery, 

'at the following price: 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid 

Per dozen, “ *' ‘‘ 

“ sent by express at. purchasers 

expense 

Pocket edition, - 

T,,e German Spelling Book, a work of 100 
na"es udapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those' who wish to study the German language 
without a teacher. 

Prico per copy, by mail. - - 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers ex- ^ 

For larger quant it/ vs special rates will be given 

, ’ , \vl- P HAVE < y^ a small number of the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, winch 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
t ho United States, for 75 cents. 

Angbneiimk Stunden in Zion. The little nook, 
.. Unnuhnc St undr n in Zion." written by Ulrich 
Steiner a Mcnnonitc minister in Switzerland, to 
,hc Soi'incnberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 

Per single copy, postage prepaid, - % O 1U 

“ dozen, * 

• • hundred, by express, at purchasers 

. expense, - • * ~ ", _ 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
ungnag, worthy of being read by all 


60 

$6 00 

6 00 
75 


German Catechism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use Of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they Bhould 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our office, 
at the following prices: 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ 0 10 
Per dozen, “ “ “ 1 

“ hundred, by express, - ‘ ° u 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
hook of 80 pages, written by Chas. W alker, D. D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
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“How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.” 

Vol, 9 -So. 6. ELKHART, INDI ANA, JUNE 1872. Whole No. 102. 


Prayer. 

CLINTON C0LEGR0VK. 

My God! I hear thee; Speak 1 
Speak when the hour is still, 

The languago of thy perfect love, 

The message of thy will. 

Speak to my heart and mind 
Thy thoughts of kind concern, 

And let thy love a fervent flame 
I Bacred sweetness burn. 

Dear Father ! make me new, 

Take all my sins away, 

Enrobe me in thy righteousness, 

And guide me in thy way. 

O ! let the light of God 
(In mercy on me shed) 

Adorn my rough and weary road, 
And bless my heart and head. 

Self-love and pride subdue ; 

Thy glory be my joy, 

Thy pleasure my most precious wish, 
Thy service my employ. 



for the Herald of Truth. 

The Unanswerable Question of the 
Great Salvation. 

by j. m brenneman. 

“How shall we escape if we neglect 1 
so great salvation,’’ Ileb. 2 : 3. 

In natural and temporal things, men gen- 
erally have such a degree of wisdom that 
they regard and value that most which they 
think the best and most valuable, and also 
that they seek after that first, and above all 
things, that if possible they may obtain and 
possess it; and he that chooses that which 
is less valuable, and despises and rejects 
that which is better, is looked upon as a 
foolish man. 

If then mankind in general manifest 
snch wisdom in regard to temporal and per- 1 
ishable things, that they esteem that which I 
is better above that which is of less value, | 
how much more should they do this in re- 
gard to spiritual and eternal things. 

Now 1 ask, Where is there any thing bet- 
ter or of greater value for man to obtain 
in heaven or upon earth, than the salvation 
which the apostle, in the foregoing text has 
in view? And this salvation too, man may 
obtain and possess forever, if he will; and 
it is of greater value to him than all the worl 
ever can he. But alar where is there any 


thing of great value that mankind so gener- 
ally regard less than this salvation, which 
our kind, heavenly Father, by grace through 
his beloved Son Jesus Christ, desires to be- 
stow upon us. . . 

Even the professors of Christianity, who 
claim to he followers and disciples of Jesus, 
are generally a great deal too slothful and cold 
in the good fight of faith ; they live along 
as carelessly and unconcerned as though 
they did not at ull believe what they profess, 
namely, that there really is an eternal sal- 
vation for them to obtain ; or as if one could 
go to heaven without a struggle or a conflict. 
There are indeed at the present time, among 
us far too many who once Beemed to be 
warm and zealous contenders against sin 
and the vanities of the world, and for the 
kingdom of Christ, but now appear to have 
become cold and without love, and aie as 
though they were standing still or even 
retrograding. 

That such lukewarmness, or slackness had 
manifested itself among the Hebrew Church, 
and that there were .at least Borne who were 
beginning to grow weary and cold, or per- 
haps indeed to' apostatize, is very plainly to 
be seen in the language used by the apostle 
in this Epistle, which especially was the 
reason why he directed the words of oui 
text unto them. 

In the third ch.apter he presents to them 
for their warning, the obduracy and unbe- 
lief of the children of Israel in the wilder- 
ness, when they were upon their way to the 
promised land of Canaan, and how that Hod 
finally swarc that they should not enter into 
his rest. Again he says, “ r I ake heed, breth- 
ren, lest there be in any ot you au evil heart 
of unbelief, in departing from the living 
Cod; but exhort one another daily, while it 
is called To-day; lest any of you be harden- 
cd through the deceitfulness of sin, lor we 
arc made partakers of Christ if we hold the 
betrinning of our confidence steadfast unto 
the end,” Heb. 3 : 12-14. Mark, we must 
hold out faithful unto the end it we will be 
saved. I11 the lOth verse we read, ‘‘bo we 
see that they could not cuter in because of 
unbelief.” Then in the first verse of the 
fourth chapter, we read, “ Let us therefore 
fear lest a promise being left us of entering 
into his rest, any of you should seem to come 
short of it,” and in the eleventh verse, “ Let 
us labor therefore to enter into that rest, 
lest any man fall after the same example oj 


unbelief” In the sixth chapter, fourth to 
sixth verses, he says, “ For it is impossible 
for those who were once enlightened and 
have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were 
made partakers of the Holy Ghost, and have 
tasted the good word of God, and the 
powers of the world to come, if they fall 
away, to renew them again unto repentance,^ 
seeing they crucify to themselves the Son ot 
God afresh, and put him to an open shame;” 
and verses eleven and twelve, “And we de- 
sire that every one of you do shew the same 
diligence to the full assurance of hope unto 
the end, that ye be not slothful (mark), but 
followers of them who through faith and 
patience inherit the promises. And chapter 
: 23 — 26, “ Let us hold fast the profession 
of our faith without wavering, for he is faith- 
ful who has promised, * * * * not forsaking 
the assembling of ourselves together , as the man- 
ner of some is, * * * * for if we sin willfully 
after that we have received the knowledge 
of the truth, there remaineth no more sacri- 
fice for sins.” Verse 35—38, “ Cast not away 
therefore your confidence, which hath great 
recompense of reward ; for ye have need of 
patience, that, after ye have done the will of 
God, ve might receive the promise. * * 

Now the just shall live by faith ; but if any 
man draw back (mark), my soul shall ha\ e 
no pleasure in him.” “Let us lay .aside every 
weight and the sin which doth so easily beset 
us (mark), and let us run with patience the 
race that is set before us, * * * * for con- 
sider him (Jesus) that endured such contra- 
diction of sinners against lnmsclf, lest ye be 
weary and faint in your minds i welith 
and thirteenth verses, “Wherefore lift up 
the hands which hang down, and the feeble 
knees, and make straight paths for your feet, 
lest that which is lame be turned out ot^tbe 

way.” . • 

From the above quoted passages, it is 

plainly shown that the apostle perceived 
that there was a certain degree of slothful- 
ness and unconcern among the Hebrews, 
vea a turning aside from Christianity and by 
some of them, danger even of apostatizing, 
and hence it may also be clearly seen what 
his object was in directing to them the im- 
portant question, namely, that he might 
earnestly encourage them and call them 
back from their slothlulness, and set before 
them the great danger to which they would 
expose themselves if they neglected this 
great salvation. 


isiESE/^XiID OH TRUTH. 


Wm 


The apostle mentions in the first chapter, then ‘‘shall we escape if wc neglect so great sb 

how God in these last days has spoken salvation ?” , U< 

“ unto us by his Son whom he hath appoint- It seems as though the apostle could not w 
cd heir of all things, by whom he also made find words to describe this salvation, he w 
the worlds who being the brightness of his | says simply, to great salvation, as though he w 
glory and the express image of his person, I would say, Such a great, incomprehensible | b< 
and upholding all things by the word of his and indescribable salvation, which canno , h 
power, when he had by himself purged our be expressed, which could only be accorn- e- 
sins, sat down on the right hand of the plished by the shed and holy blood of the h 
Majesty on high.” Further he shows us how | Son of Almighty bod. 01 

the Son was made so much better than the , The word salvation means to save or h 

angels, and how he by inheritance obtained ' to preserve, or redeem, or rescue from dan- 

a more excellent name than they, and how gcr.from sulfor.ng/lrom any calamity, from h 
.hat all the angels of God shall worship destruction or «. any impending evil of n 
j . o h all y kind. To be (saved m the sense in which a 

'Now in the beginning of the second the word is used in the Scriptures, means | d 
chapter, the apostle says, “Therefore (be- to he redeemed from the bondage of Bin h 
cause the Son of God being made so much and the power of eternal death, and to ob- , r 
better than the angels) we ought to give the tain everlasting happiness. Hence being saved, | t 
more earnest heed to the things which we indicates and comprehends a condition of j i 
have heard (the word of reconciliation, the safety, security, happiness and blessedness. : ‘ 
word of the gospel which God through his On the other hand, not being saved, or the t 
Sou hath declared), lest at any time we contrary of salvation, indicates and compre- s 
should let them slip (that is forget or disrc- liends a condition of insecurity, of danger, < 
gard or reject them and thus he led to per- of impending calamity, of sorrow, suffering 1 
iiition): for if the word spoken by angels and unhappiness, without the power of es- i 
(which are so much inferior to the Son), was cape or rescue. Now if any one should res- 1 
steadfast and every transgression and diso- cue a person in this miserable, sad and de- 1 
bedience received a just recompense of re- plorable condition, and place him into a I 
ward (its deserved punishment)} how shall safe, happy, pleasant and blessed condition, [ 
we escape if we neglect so great salvation, we could very properly say he teas saved i' rotu j i 
which at the first began to be spoken by the his calamity, and lie is blessed and happy. 
Lord (Jesus) and was confirmed unto us by ! The Queen of Sheba, when she saw the 
them (the apostles) that heard him?” ' ' wisdom, wealth and glory of Solomon, said 
“The word spoken by angels,” here, it to him “Happy are thy men happy are 
seems to me, means the Law; for on this these thy servants which stand continually 
wise Stephen spake to the Jews, “ Ye* have before thee, and that hear thy wisdom, 
received the law by the disposition of angels 1 Kings 10 : 8. Yet this was only a tem- 
and have not kept it,” Acte 7 : 53. And poral happiness which must soon pass away, 
Paul savs, Gal. 3:19, “Wherefore then while the great salvation of which our text 
serveth the Law ? It was added because of speaks endureth forever 
transgressions, till the seed should come, to I By the fall of Adam a 1 Ins offspring fell 
whom the promise was made; and it was under the power of Satan, and under sin, | 
ordained by angels in the hand of a media- death and condemnation, for “by the offense 
tor.” It appears as though the angels were onc ) judgment came upon ad men o 
instrumental in the giving of the law, and condemnation (Rom. o : 18), from which 
the law imposed a penalty upon the trails- they could never have rescued themselves, 
gressor ; for if any one transgressed the law inasmuch as they had thus become entirely 
of Moses, he must die, without mercy, under corrupted and without the power of them- I 
two or three witnesses. Thus every trans- selves to do anything that is good, and ! 
gression receives its due reward; “of how alienated from the life of God, and separa- 
uiuch sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall i tod 1 rom him by sin ; yea, they were unholy, 
lie be thought worthy, who hath trodden I ungodly, carnal and earthly, miserable, 
under foot the Son of God and hath counted wretched, poor and lost, yea, by nature ebu- 
the blood of the covenant wherewith lie was dren "'rath. J hey were indeed excccd- 
s/nctified, an unholy thing, and hath done j * n &ty unhappy. 

despite unto the Spirit of grace?” llcb. 10 : . Although our text seems to have been 

28,29. For such an one “there remaineth no directed especially to the slothful and hike- 
more sacrifice for sins.” “The law was given warm professors of Christianity, yet in this 
by Moses, but grace and truth came by exhortation the non-professors or impenitent 
Jesus Christ,” Jn. 1:17. By grace we shall also be included ; for to them this lm- 
must be saved, and the truth bliaU make us | portent question is especially adapted . How 
free, if we acknowledge aud receive it. y ou esca P e if you neglect so great snl- 

Jesus himself is the truth, and his word is 1 vation for if the righteous scarcely be 
the truth. His word also is “the gospel of saved where shall the ungodly and sinner 
the grace of God” (Acts 20 : 24), wherein appear? Therefore hear, yc poor mortals 
the plan of our salvation is comprehended, ! without exception, who are so deeply fallen 
which also “is the power of God uuto sal- bi siu, what God hath dime “while we were 
vation to every one that bclievcth.” How j dead in trespasses anu sins. ihc kind and 

merciful Father however would not that 

^ German Tmuslatiou, I these poor, unhappy, and lost mortal beings 


should be left to remain in this sad condi- 
tion, hut speedily comforted them again 
with the promise of his Son, whom he also, 
when the time was fulfilled, sent into the 
world, “that the world through him might 
be saved,” “for God so loved the world, that 
he gave his only begotten Son, that whoso- 
ever bclieveth in him should not perish, but 
have everlasting life.” lie “spared not his 
only Son, but delivered him up for us all;” 
he came in the form of a poor servant; 

I “ though he was rich, yet for our sakes 
he became poor, that wo through his poverty 
might be rich.” “He went about doing good, 
and healing all that were oppressed of the 
devil.” The gospel (the glad tidings of peace) 
he preached to the poor. He commenced 
, his sermon on the Mount by declaring the 
beatitudes. lie said, “Blessed are the poor 
in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” 

: “Blessed are they that mourn, for they shall 
be comforted.” When a man is brought to 
a proper knowledge of himself, by the means 
of grace, then he also feels that he is a poor, 
lost sinner, which bring&th poverty of spirit, 
and he feels humbled; his sins will press 
upon him as a heavy burden, and will cause 
him to feel a godly sorrow, and to mourn 
for them. To such the Savior promises the 
kingdom of heaven and comfort, “ for godly 
; sorrow worketh sepentance to salvation not 
to he repented of,” 2 Cor. 7:10. 

Jesus also promises the blessing upon the 
. meek, upon those who hunger and thirst 
! after righteousness, upon the merciful, upon 
' the pure in heart, upon the peacemakers, &c. 

’ The penitent souls, those who sought salva- 
- tion, he always comforted, aud never cast 
, them away, or despised them. Those that 
t labor and are heavy laden, he kindly invited 
to come to him and promised to give rest to 
1 their souls, for he came to comfort all that 
, mourn. He is the same loving Jesus that 
e he always was, and finally after having ful- 

0 filled his course here on earth, accomplished 
li the counsel and will of his Father, and de- 

i, dared salvation and peace uuto mau, be 
y permitted himself to be nailed to the cross 
i- by the hands of sinful men, where he sacri- 

1 ficed his holy and innocent life and precious 
l- blood, for the ransom and propitiation of our 

j, sins and of the sins of the whole world. “He 
i, gave himself a ransom for all.” He “ gave 
1- himself for our sins that ho might deliver us 
l- from this present evil world,” Gal. 1 : 4, 

“and from all unrighteousness,” Tit. 2 : 14. 
n He suffered for sins, the just for the unjust 
e- He died for the ungodly, Kom. 5 : 6, and 
is tasted death for every man, Heb. 2 : 9. Be- 
it hold, with what a precious price we are 
a- purchased. Greater love hath no man than 
w this that a man lay down his life for his 
d- friends. Jesus did this for us while we wore 
ae yet enemies, Rom. 5 : 10, enemies by 
or j wicked works, Col. 1 : 4. 
ils | After bis resurrection, Jesus appeared to 
m his disciples and said, “ Thus it is written 
re and thus it behooved Christ to suffer and to 
id rise from the dead the third day, and that 
iat repentance and remission of sins should be 
gs I preacted in his name among all nations,’’ 


83 


1872 


EIEBALD OF TBTJTH. 


Luke 24 : 46, 47. And before ho ascended 
to heaven he said unto them, “Go ye into 
all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature ; he that believeth and is baptized 
shall be saved;” (mark), shall be saved, “ re- 
ceiving the end of your faith, even the sal- 
vation of your souls,” 1 Pet. 1* : 9. He that 
believeth on Jesus and his teachings, be- 
comes obedient and endureth to the end, 
shall be saved with an everlasting salva- 
tion, for “he (Jesus) became the author of 
salvation unto all them that obey him,” 
Heb. 5 : 9. “Believe on the Lord Jesus 
Christ and thou shalt be saved.” 11 He is 
able to save them to the uttermost 
that come unto God by him,” Heb. 7 : 25. 
“He is the way, the truth and the life, 
and no man cometh to the Father but by 
him.” “Neither is there salvation in any 
other ; for there is none other name under 
heaven given among men, whereby we must 
be saved!” The angel said to Joseph, “Thou 
shalt call his name Jesus; for he shall save 
his people trom their sins ;” that is, he will 
redeem them from sin, and make them again 
pure, holy and happy, and bring them into a 
blessed and happy condition. “This is a 
faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation 
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save 
sinners.” He will save (make happy) them 
in time and in eternity. Already here 
in this life he- saves us, as the apostle de- 
clares, 2 Tim. 1 : 9, “Who has saved us,” 
yet are we saved by hope, Rom. 8 : 24. He 
will forgive us our sins, if in faith and with 
a penitent mind, we turn to him, and he will 
make us pure and holy through his Spirit 
and the blood of propitiation. Ho also makes 
us free from tbc condemnation of sin, and 
no longer hold the account ot them against 
us. He also gives us peace and the spirit of 
adoption (a child-like spirit) whereby we 
cry (with confidence) Abba, Father, lie 
also gives us a contented mind and a pure 
conscience, strength and comfort in every 
time of need, and besides this a living hope, 
finally to inherit the everlasting kingdom of 
heaven. ( To be continued .) 


Tranelatod from th« " GememdcMatt." 

Origin or the Mennonlte Church, aud 
the Life of Mcnno. 


Continued. 


The Waldeuses also originated in the 
twelfth century, and were named after Pe- 
ter Waldus, a rich merchant ot Lyons, who, 
through the sudden death of a relative 
while in conversation in company, was 
awakened and converted. He bestowed 
all of his large estate to the poor, and in 
the year 1180 he entered into the service of 
the Lord, as a preacher of the (Tospel He 
effected the translation of the New Testa- 
ment into the language of his people. After 
indefatigable and richly blessed labor, he 
was every where persecuted, and was obliged 
to flee from one province of France to an- 
other, and wherever he came he proclaimed 
the truth. 


He was finally driven from his native 
country, and entered Germany, where his 
persecutions were just as severe. Through 
persecution, in 1184 he was driven to Bohe- 
mia, where lie became established, and con- | 
tinued to teach until his death. Wherever 
this servant of God came, thriving churches 
sprang up ; and his doctrine spread into 
other parts also. What relates to the doc- 
trine and regulations of the Waldensers, can 
be learned from different church historians, I 
from their own confessions, and from the 
following : In the Martyrs’ Mirror it is said 
of them, 1st, That they baptized no infants; j 
2nd, They worshiped no saints, but called j 
on God alone ; They say, ‘ God is our Ad- j 
vooate, he forgives sins ; He knocks that we 
may open unto him. He desires that every 
soul shall take refuge in him alone. He is 
the door, and whosoever entereth by him 
shall be saved ; 3rd, That they lead a Chris- 
tian and an unspotted life ; 4th, That they 
do not take an oath under any circum- 
stances; and 5th, They suffer no beggars 
among them, but counsel and assist one an- 
other in a brotherly manner. They disap- 
prove of war, and the bearing of arms.’ 
Eberhardt, a papistical writer, in an arti- 
cle against the Waldensers, says, “ That in 
regard to infant baptism, they upheld the 
doctrine of Jesus, in Matt. 28 : 19, 20, and 
Mark 16: 16, contrary to the judgment of 
the church, therefore, it was necessary to 
believe before baptism ; hence they say. 
‘Shall a child which does not believe, neither 
has the ability to believe, be baptized, uutil 
it possesses that ability ?” In the year 1 544 
they delivered their confession of faith to 
the king of France, in which the article on 
baptism says, “We believe that water bap- 
tism is an outward, visible sign, which man- 
ifests itself through the invisible works ol 
G%d in us, namely : The renewal of our | 
minds, and the mortification of our mem- 
bers, Col. 3: 5, through faith in Jesus 
Christ. After we have confessed our faith, j 
and changed our way of life, through this 
ordinance we are received into the holy 
communion of the people of God.” 

The principal feature in the rules ot the 
Waldensers, was the avoidance by their 
ciders and preachers, of apostolic, preten- 
sions, official incomes, priestly honors, and 
authority, which they considered as highly 
corrupt. They said, “ Our food and rai- , 
nient will be sufficiently provided through 
gifts and alms, by the generosity of those 
whom we instruct.” However, not all who 
wero called Waldensers, entertained this 
same doctrine and faith ; but many were so 
called, or held as such, because they pro- 
tected them, hut were not brethren, or 
members of their churches. Others fell off 
who had been members, through fear of the 
great persecutions; again others separated 
from the Catholic church, and formed sep- 
arate, evangelical churches, but retained 
many things, such as infant baptism ; but in 
general they were anabaptists, that is, they 
practiced baptism in accordance with the 
apostolic usage, and other apostolic ordi- 


nances, both in doctrine and life, as shown 
by many passages in the Martyrs Mirror, 
taken from ancient history. Their enemies 
gave them the following evidence : “ They 

are mostly an unrefined, uneducated people, 
frequently clad in skins, and generally live 
in miserable huts and caves ; notwithstand- 
ing, all can read and write. We found cul- 
tivators of the soil who could repeat the 
book of Job from memory; others who knew 
the New Testament entire; and every 
youth among them has a clear conception of 
their faith. They never swear, and seldom 
take the name of God in vain ; fulfill their 
promises with fidelity, and support them- 
selves by their labor. Their preachers are 
weavers and tailors.” 

In the year 1498 their enemies entered a 
complaint to Louis XII, king ot l 1 ranee, 
that enormous outrages had been committed 
by the Waldensers, in the province. The 
king sent a court-officer and his coufcssor. 
to investigate the matter, who reported on 
their return, that they traversed all those 
parts where Waldcosen churches existed, 
and nowhere did they find any trace ot the 
crimes of which they were accused ; but on 
the contrary, that they observed the 8ab- 
bath ; exercised the ordinance ot baptism as 
the primitive, Christian churches, and in- 
structed their children in the doctrine of the 
Christian faith, aud the commandments of 

God. 

The Waldensers were persecuted with un- 
heard of cruelty' by the Catholic church, ol 
which I will only relate a few instances. In 
1209, an army of 300,000, and by son s 
said to be 50 0,90 9 men, was started to ex- 
terminate the Albigenses, or Waldeuses, and 
in a few mouths there were 200,000 persons 
sacrificed. These massacres, called crusades, 
were continued from year to year. In the 
year 1234 it was estimated that one million 
defenseless Christians had been executed, 
and those that remained, scattered and 
formed colonies in different, parts. 

In the year 1484, an army marched into 
the valley of Loyse in Piedmont, in Italy, to 
exterminate the heretics. They fled to their 
caves in the summits of the mountains, 
taking their children with them. 1 be 
commander of the troops give orders to till 
the mouths of the caves with wood and fare 
it, and thus 400 children were suffocated, 
many of them iu their mothers ai ms. 
Great numbers ot adults were crushed by 
casting thomselves from precipices upon 
the rocks beneath, to escape death by the 
flames ; but if a single one was not killed 
by the fall, he was speedily dispatched by 
the barbariaus. Three thousand were sacri- 
ficed in one valley. At another time the 
quiet inhabitant* of this valley were driven 
across the rough, ice-clad Alps in the 
| midst of winter. Mothers bore their in- 
fants in cradles over the snowy regions, while 

the larger children were clinging to their 
arms. *N early two hundred of these little 
cues lay frozen there, others starved, some 
| were slain with the sword, and soon the 


l 




84 


hieir/.a.lid of trutk 


lutte 


mothers followed from grief. Everywhere 
with similar fury the persecution raged, not 
only in Italy, France, England, Holland, 
Acc., but also in Germany. 

The English reformer, John Wickliff, 
born in 1284, also entertained the doctrine 
of the Waldensers. In one of his works, in 
reference to baptism, he declares that bap- 
tism can be fulfilled on adults alone; more- 
over, in the same work he opposes the doc- 
trine, that infant baptism is an agency for 
their redemption, and that the neglect of it 
by their parents could be any cause of their 
condemnation, since God has not ordained 
baptism to call forth grace, or to cause re- 
generation. According to the account given 
in the Martyrs’ Mirror, Wickliff not only 
declared infant baptism as unscriptural, but 
also that the swearing of oaths was forbid- 


den. In England his followers were vehe- 
mently persecuted by fire and sword. 

In the year 1 4 1 5 , John Huss and Iliero- 
nimus, of Prague, were burned in Constance, 
for their testimony of the gospel truth, 
and for maintaining the same doctrine as 
Wickliff, with whose works they were ac- 
quainted, and whose disciples they were. 

In a letter dated the 10th of October, 1 51 9, 
from Bohemia to Erasmus, the doc- 
trines of tlic Hussites tiro written, sis 
follows : “ They reject every rite (church 

custom), and all ceremonies of our church ; 
scorn our doctrine and proceedings in re- 
gard to both sacraments ; reject spiritual 
honor (regulations oi spiritual power); elect 
officers (preachers and deacons) in the 
church from the laity ; know no criterion 
but the Bible ; admit none to their com- 
munion (sacrament) until lie is baptized, 
and they called themselves brethren and 
sisters with respect to rank. From which 
it is inferred that they had an apostolic 
church government, as it may also be learned 
from the Martyrs’ Mirror: neither was the 
taking of oaths tolerated. 

The Martyrs’ Mirror relates further, That 
as .John Huss began to teach, and many 
people adhered to him, that many Waldcn- 
ses united with him, who rejoiced and 
Imped that the gospel light, which long be- 
fore had been suppressed by the 1'apal 
church, would then spread without hindcr- 
ance. But after the death of John Huss | 
and llieronimus of Prague, the Hussites ol 
Bohemia, waged a barbarous and bloody 
war against the Emperor Sisigmuud, and 
other German princes; hence the greater 
part of the Waldensers withdrew, as it was 
against their confession of faith, and tlieir 
consciences to bear arms, and as the Huss- 
ites in other points of doctrine did not fol- 
low their predecessors 

The Waldensers again formed separate 
churches, and were called Grubenheimer 
(dwellers in caves), because in part they 
lived in caves, evidently on account of the 
persecution. How rapidly the \\ aldeu- 
seu church grow at that time, can bo 
learned from a history of his brethren, pub- 
lished by George Morrell, one of their 


preachers, in the year 15.10, asserting their 
number at 800,000. 

From the foregoing account we sec that , 
the churches of the anabaptists , which have 
been stigmatized with this detestable epi- | 
thet, did" not first originate with the fanati- j 
cal sect of the M unsterit.es in the sixteenth i 
century, as is generally, erroneously sup- 
posed, much less have they descended from 
them ; but under different names, there 
have existed, ever since the time of the 
apostles, churches, in which baptism, as in- 
stituted by Jesus, and after the example of 
the first apostolic churches, was applied only 
to believers, and in which the word of God 
alone was admitted as the rule of faith and 
life, and also in other church ordinances ; 
although the ruling church barbarously per- 
secuted, oppressed, and sought to exterminate 
them. ( To be continued.) 


Little Tilings. 


God hath chosen the weak things of 
the world to confound the things which 
are mighty,” 1 Cor, 1 : 27. 


Humility becometh man at all times and 
under all circumstances. Yet there is such 
a thing as failing to do what wc might and 
should do, simply from a want of confidence 
in our ability. The almost universal reply 
of Christians when asked or urged to assist 
in some spiritual work is, “ Oh, 1 can do 
nothing !” Whose fault is it that you are 
weak ? Do you not profess to be a follower 
of Christ and believe in his promises ? Have 
you read the words of the Savior ? “ Ask 

and it shall be given unto you.” “ If two 
of you agree as touching anything that they 
shall ash, it shall be done.” “ If you have 
faith as a grain of mustard-seed, ye shall say 
to this mountain, Remove hence to yomior 
place, and it shall remove, and nothing shall 
be impossible unto you.” “ Whoso cometh 
uuto me I will in nowise cast out.” If all 
power in heaven and earth is given unto 
Jesus, and he so free *to give unto us, what 
may we not receive ? If we arc willing to 
accept his assistance, and permit him to 
work through us, what may we not do? He 
is omnipotent. The Lord of Hosts. A Sun 
and Shield to those who fear him; and what- 
ever assistance avo need he is able to be- 
stow. Again, he never calls upon us to do 
what we are unable to do. This would be 
unbecoming a being of iulinite wisdom. 
With the call, he places in our hands the 
means of success. He promises that “ Ilis 
grace shall be sufficient for us.” For shame 
then, that we should say we are weak, and 
thus bring reproach upon our Master ! 

ltather say, with thy help, O Lord, I will 
be a faithful and valiant soldier of the cross! 

I will be instant in and out of season to 
speak for Jesus ! Let ns then heed every 
call of duty, and never disregard the 
promptings of the Spirit, but always be 
ready to act with confidence in our success, 
knowing that the Lord workswith us. Then 
shall we truly be able to overcome the 


things which are mighty. Many examples 
are given for our encouragement. Elisha, 
with a little salt, purified the waters of Jeri- 
cho, and made fertile the soil. The widow 
of the prophet w'ho had left at his death a 
heavy debt upon his family, had but a little 
oil, yet with it she was able to pay her great 
debt, and even support her family. A little 
meal and oil kept a widow, her son and a 
prophet from starving during a long famine. 
Christ fed five thousand people with a few 
loaves and fishes ; and thus we might go on 
multiplying. But you say these were mir- 
acles. True, and the Lord is as able to per- 
form them now as he was in the time of 
Noah. The day of miracles is not past. If 
you doubt this, why pray to him to keep 
you from danger ? Why ask him to help 
you in a present difficulty ( Why entreat 
him to cleanse you from sin ? Why say, 

“ Thy will be done in earth as it is in 
heaven ?” These are as impossible with us 
as to feed the five thousand. All these are 
miracles, and you ask this performance 
every day. If you believe this, what ex- 
cuse have you to offer for your recreant im- 
potence ? Let me exhort you to be more 
faithful in future. Attend to every call of 
duty, without stopping to estimate the 
weight of the burden, or to measure your 
strength. Though weak in Christ you may 
be strong. Though you have but one tal- 
ent, you are required to use it as diligently 
as he who has ten. Remember that a little 
leaven leaveneth the whole lump, that the 
leaven is ever active, either for good or evil. 
No man’s influence is so weak as to effect 
nothing; and he who does not exert it for 
good, scattereth seeds of destruction. Ac. 
are the salt of the earth. Oh, may we 
through the abounding grace of Christ, be 
an intensely active purifier, that we may save 
the world from corruption and ruin. It. 


For the Herald ofTruth. 

The Fear of God. 


This seems to bo a familiar phrase, yet, 
peradventure there arc some persons who 
do not understand its direct signification ; 
and I do not feel myself adequate to ex- 
plain it fully to our readers, but I shall try, 
by the help of God, to expound it to you 
as best I can. 

AVe will first consider the filial fear which 
exists in judicious children, whenever they 
feel, or think they might do something that 
will be displeasing to their parents. They 
try to obey them in every respect, and know 
that itis wrong todisobeyand offendthem, ol 
which wc also have ample proof in the Holy 
Scripture. They do not only fear the pun- 
ishment of their pareuts, but they will n<>t 
displease them when they know it is wrong- 

Just so with the child of God; that is 
with the person who fears God. Such a 
filial fear is also in him. He tries to walk 
under God’s commandments, and fears he 
might do something that will be against the 
will of God. He truly fears him in his 


• #.4 s 


1872 


85 


OIF 1 TRUTH 


heart, and trembles when he perpetrates a 
sin. Such will be the true fear of God. 
There is, however, another class of children 
who are obstinate, and reluctantly obey 
their parents. They constantly disobey them 
and they also fear them when they know 
they have done something against their 
will ; but they only fear the punishment 
which their parents will inflict upon them. 
So it is with thousands of people, and even 
with Christian professors, now-a-da 3 ’s. They 
Icdow that God in his omnipresence knows 
all they do, and that he will inflict punish- 
ment upon them for every idle deed. 
Therefore, they have no fear of disobeying him 
but only fear his punishment. But this is 
not the true fear of God like that of the child. 

When Christ gave charge to the apostles 
he said, “ Fear not them which kill the 
body, hut are not able to kill the soul ; but 
rather fear him which is able to destroy 
both soul and body in hell,” Matt. ]0: 28 ; 
that is,theyshould*fear to do wrong, because 
he will bring them into judgment for their 
evil deeds, and recompense them according 
as they deserved. Hence, “the fear of 
God ” consists of a “filial affection ” in the 
heart towards God, which is continually 
fermenting, and not accumulating, sin upon 
sin, and thus walking careless before God, 
and yet fearing the punishment he will in- 
flict upon us in that awful day. O, that 
every one who reads this, my humble writ- 
ing, might “ fear God ” and still aspire for 
more of that filial fear wdiich must abound 
in the heart of every true Christian ; and 
like Zacharias and Elizabeth, be righteous 
before God, and walk “in all the command- 
ments and ordinances of the Lord blame- 
less,” Luke 1:6. 

In conclusion, let each one, with a volun- 
tary and prayerful heart, peruse and study 
the word of God, and blessed assurance ; he 
will find it precious to his soul, and experi- 
ence “ the fear of God” fermenting in his 
heart. 

• Mahoning Co Ohio. 


A. 


For the norahl of Tnitll. 

The Momentous Question. 

“There came one running, and kneeled to him, 
and asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that 
1 may inherit eternal life.” Mark, 10: 17. 

I do not doubt, but this is the most im- 
portant question that ever was asked, or 
that ever could be asked by any one. For 
this is evidently, the great object, for which 
God has created every human being, “to in- 
herit eternal life,” and every one, no doubt, 
knows that this is the chief design for which 
God has created them, and entrusted to 
them a soul, to qualify it for that eternal 
rest, which God has prepared for all who 
love him, from the foundation of the world. 

But it is not enough to ash this question 
only ; was it any benefit to this young man, 
to ask this momentous question ? r I ho text 
says, that he even came “ running and kneeled 
to him,” to ask this question; but let us con- 


sider what an answer Christ gave him : 
“Thou k nowest the commandments. Bo 
not commit adultery. Do not kill, Do not steal, 
I)o not bear false witness, Defraud not, 
Honor thy father and mother,” and yea, 
who could now-a-days, with such an intrep- 
id and honest heart say, Master, all these 
have I observed from my youth. Does not 
this seem to have been a prudent Christian, 
who, when Jesus repeated the command- 
mends, could say, “ all these have I observed 
from my youth ?” Indeed it does ; but let 
us see what Jesus further commanded 
him : “One thing thou lackest : go thy 

way, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give it 
to the poor, and thou shalt have a treasure 
in heaven, and come, take up thy cross and 
follow me.” Oh ! what a test this was to 
him! He came as if he would bo willing to 
do any thing, the good Master would bid 
him do, but "alas! how often is this the case 
with many, who, like he, have their heart and 
trust in their “great posessions.” Yea, “he 
was sad at that saying, and went away 
grieved; for he had great posessions. 
Thus we see, that after all this anxious in- 
quiry he went away from Jesus, and wc 
do not read that he ever came to him again. 
O what a pity! Even in our present day, 
how deplorable it is to see so many who 
seom to have a similar heart to this young 
man. They seem to ask this monentous 
question; but O ! their “great posessions,” 
still hinders them from coming to Christ. 

O reader, reflect upon this, and ponder it 
in your heart, that you may not, like this 
amiable youth fall short of heaven. 1 en- 
treat you, ask this question; but, as already 
remarked, to ash it is not enough. Wc 
must first renounce all transitory amuse- 
ments and posessions, and make Christ qur 
dearest object, then we may, by his divine 
influence, not only be able to ash this im- 
portant question, but also to do it. 

Mahoning co., Ohio. A. 31. 


For tli<> Herald of Truth. 

Meekness. 


BY REV. J. L. LANDIS. 


Said Paul, “I beseech you by the 
meekness of Christ.” Meekness is 
, a Christian grace of rare mien and 
contemplates all that we understand 
by humility, resignation and sub- 
mission to the divine will, without 
murmuring, and opposed to pride 
and arrogance. It is a forbearance 
under injuries and provocations, in 
being sustained by calm, equable 
temper and trust. It is exhibiting 
at all times the same hopeful and 
charitable spirit, and practically 
proving to the world whether it be 
an affront, or sorrow or suffering, 
that all things are for the best. 

Said Christ, “I am meek and 
lowly in heart.” And how marvel- 


ously did his whole life correspond 
with it! what meekness under inso- 
lence! What forbearance under 
taunt, rejection and persecution by 
his enemies and the faithless- 
ness of his own disciples! Meek- 
ness is a grace which . Jesus 
alo^e inculcated, and which no 
ancient philosopher seems to 
have understood or recommended. 
Not immediately to resent an injury 
or wrong, was considered by them 
to be cowardice. And to behave 
under such attacks with due patience 
and meekness is, it must be con- 
fessed, one of the most trying ex- 
ercises of the spirit. But we are by 
no means to imagine, however, that 
religion tends, as some allege, to 
extinguish the sense of honor or to 
suppress the exertion of a manly 
spirit. Bor it is no proof of manli- 
ness to bluster insolently and 
threaten violence. It does not prove 
a man brace to go oil in a tit of un- 
controllable passion at every trifle. 
The truly noble man is. above such 
recourse; lie throws himself upon 
the dignity of a better and higher 
bearing. So a meek Christian 
does not imply either a subject ol 
cowardice or servility to his religion, 
but he is borne above quarrels— 
does not officiously seek to inter- 
meddle and provoke, is no busy- 
body in other mens’ matters; neith- 
er does he ascribe bad motives and 
the worst principles to all that diffei 
with him; but would guard against 
such a malignant spirit. He culti- 
vates that charity which thmketli 
no evil and which will make a 11. ins 
conduct as well as liis opinions just 
and generous. A conduct that 
“ suflereth long and is kind; ’ and 
to call the cliristian religion a com- 
promise of the courage and true 
chivalry of man’s nature, is to say 
that more men have died for a lie 
than for the truth; to say that 
Christianity denied itself and the 
Savior that brought them before 
kings and in the presence, ot the 
rack and the stake, and indeed, 
that there were no martyrs. 

TV 'here, 1 ask in the history of the 
race has there been such sublime 
fortitude and heroism as dis- 
played in the thousands of Chris- 
tians who were slain for the truth 
as it is in Jesus? As the Savior 
himself, were they led as sheep to 
the slaughter, and like lambs dumb 
before their shearers so, opened 
they not tlieir mouths. 

Covdersport; I'd- 


HERALD OE TRUTH. 


gtttte 


For the Herald of Truth. 


Judge Not. 


»• Therefore thou art iuexeusa- 0 
Lie, 0 man, whosoever thou art A 
that judgest ; for wherein thou ! n 
judgest another, thou condemnest y 
thyself ; for thou that judgest r 
doest the same things,” ltom. 2 s : 1. I 

In weakness I will try by the help ^ 
of God, to say a few words in refer- 0 
ence to our text, not feeling able s 
to present it to my fellow readers ( 
as intelligently as some, but that \ 
will not excuse me, for we are all 1 
commanded to exercise the talent ( 
given us, let it be great or small ; if ( 
used to the honor of God there is a * 
reward promised. Now let us con- j 
eider the text, and see how many of 1 
us can say that we are excusable. ' 
Are we not all liable and apt to 
judge others if we see the least error, j 
and complain when we do the same j . 
things, or perhaps worse? Let us, |J 
then, be careful that we judge our- 1 
selves and we will have all that we ] 1 
can do. Judge not that ye be not ; 
judged; condemn not and ye shall 
not be condemned; forgive and ye ; 
shall be forgiven; how much more, 
then, should not we forgive, for if 
we forgive we have forgiveness 
promised, and how much forgive- 
ness do we need. If we consider 
our past lives it appears that our 
transgressions are too numerous to 
be forgiven. Oh, how thankful 
ought we to be for the blessed 
promises which are left on record 
for us! The mercy of God is suffi- 
cient for all them that believe in 
him, but there is no happiness i 
promised to them that believe not. 
How solemn the thought that there 
are so many who do not believe. I 
How can we believe and not obey 
that which God has commanded us 
to do; he says, “ If ye love me keep 
my sayings,” how then can we 
judge; for Christ says he judges no 
man but the words which he speak 
they shall judge you in the last day, 
so let us take the word of God and 
judge ourselves, and if we see a 
brother or friend err let us be care- 
ful, if not in the samefault, to avoid 
it. I have often thought that we 
ought to be corrected instead of cor- 
recting others; judged instead of 
judging; therefore let us commit 
ourselves to the Lord who is the 
judge of the quick and dead. Jesus 
says, “Ye judge after the flesh; I 
judge no man.” Again, “If any 
man hear my words, and believe 


not, I judge him not; for I came 
not to judge the world, but to save v 
the world;” and if we would judge ‘ 
ourselves we should not be judged. I 
There are many other passages that s 
might be produced, but I think this t 
wil 1 suffice to convince any one who is i 
inclined to the habit of finding fault. £ 
How often do we hear that it is easy 1 
to live as this or that man; but < 
dear fellow-reader that will neither 
| save you nor me; if we see a man ( 
do wrong, let us not think that we < 
are betterthanhe,forin this we stand j i 
in our own light. Another man’s . 
deeds cannot save us ; it will be our , 
own good deeds that will save its if i 
they are wrought by faith in the 
Lord Jesus Christ, who has bled 
and died for us, that through him j 
we may have everlasting life. How 
happy will the end be for those 
that shall hear the welcome voice, 
“Come thou faithful, enter into thy 
I joys.” If we consider the happi- 
ness that God has promised to those 
i that love him, and the terrible pun- 1 
ishment, woe and banishment from 
the presence of the Father, it ap- 
pears that not one soul could delay 
j it from one day to another. “ To- 1 
* day if ye will hear his voice, harden 
not your hearts.” How often have 1 
we transgressed after we arrived to 
■ the age of understanding. There 
. are but few that could enumerate 
> the blessings he has received in 
[ proportion to his good deeds; 
l and how many prayers have 
l we offered in return. Dear 
. reader, let us consider it well for it 
1 is only through the mercy of God 
3 ] that we have the privilege to offer 
■ up our prayers and supplications 
q to Jesus to intercede for our many 
. | transgressions. Let us ever be 
j faithful in the work of the Lord, 
s that we may ever be found doing 
p his will. Pray for one another, for 
e “the effectual, fervent prayer of a 
o righteous man availetli much.” If 
k we love God we will keep his say- 
ings. Amen. J. J. W payer. 
d Vanburen, hid. 


Worldly professors of religion, 
who come to the house of God, 
“walking and mincing as they go,” 
bedecked with tinkling ornaments 
and Babylonish garments, to take 
the uppermost seats in the sanctua- 
ry, do not want to be told of tne 
sinfulness of worldly conformity, or 
hear the bitter denunciations of 
God’s word against pride. 

They come to the church on Sun- 
day as they go to the theatre, or the 
concert, on the week day, to show 
their fine clothes and be entertained. 
And a gospel to suit them must be 
diluted; all the ugly facts about 
self-denial, cross-bearing and humil- 
ity must be glossed over or 
wreathed with the flowers of poet- 
try and eloquence. 

They have taken the vows of the 
i church without any purpose to ful- 
fill them. Like Ananias and Sap- 
phira, they have perjured them- 
selves by keeping back part of the 
price. 

i Worldliness has so deadened 
their sensibilities that, they can go 
to the communion table with a gar- 
land of flowers on their brow to 
' commemorate the death and suffer- 


Worldllness in the Church. 

— 

It requires a martyr-like courage 
in these days, when pride and 
worldliness has almost universal 
sway, to stand up in one's Christian 
integrity and maintain the gospel 
standard. And to rebuke fashion 
when it presents such a bold front 
in the Christian church, is no light 
crucifixion. 


ings of him who wore a crown of 
thorns, and stretch out jeweled 
hands to take the emblems of his 
broken body, whose hands were 
pierced with nails. 

With the Laodiceans they say, 
“I am rich, increased with goods, 
and have need of nothing;” and 
knew not “that they are wretched, 
and miserable, and blind and na- 
ked,” in his sight, whose “eyes are 
are as a flame of Are.” 

In Brazil there is a vine called 
the Matador, or Murderer. It creeps 
along the ground till it meets a vig- 
orous tree, which it eagerly fastens 
upon, and throwing out its tendrils, 
clasps in murderous embrace. 

Climbing higher and higher, and 
growing stronger and stronger, it 
saps the life current of its victim, 
nor stays it till the topmost bough 
is reached. And when its work of 
death is done, it blooms and scat- 
ters its seed for another murderous 
I course. 

Worldliness is the Matador of 
the church, it is slowly creeping in 
and clasping it in a murderous em 
brace. Where are the brave, true 
workers who will lay the axe at 
the root and help to tear it from its 
place? 

It wil require no less courage to- 
I day to stand up and rebuke and 


87 • 


1872 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


For tho Herald of Truth. 

Exhibitions. 


turn back tjie tide of worldliness we are to understand a supernatural 
and vanity from the church, than it power of God, by which the entire 
did in other years to stand up for creation in the beginning was called 
Christ in the midst of the flames. — into its existence, (Col. 1 : 16 ); and Having been invited to visit one ot our 
Selected. likewise when the Holy Spirit (or schools, as they were going to have an ex- 

Ghost) of God is spoken of (Epll. hibitiou, I accepted the invitation and gave 
4: 30 ), we are to understand not only | my attention to their exercises. I believe 
__ v nlt-n I it i s the duty of the school-teacher to in- 


[The following article appeared in the 4 — n , n i,„f „i 0 ' A 

Herald several years ago, but as many of an operative power of God, but also 

its present readers were not readers then, a sanctifying, saving, and all-re- 

ana as it has been said that whatsoever is storing power in the great plan o - r . ^ by a co . oper ation of tl 

worth reading at all, is worth reading the redemption, Since through tlie fall . fc fiee tbat the pupils, par 

second time, we take the liberty to reprint it.] all things have so fallen into a state comruU) - is benefitte a by it. I hr 

Tho <iin tho Hnlv (i'nost disorder, that we, poor creatures, -i— ,.v. Return 

TllC bln Agai nst tne llOl) uno. i. ^ ave lost altogether the power to 

vr„u 19 . 01 09 What i-s the sin amend or reform ourselves, and our j 

JS^S.'SAiSrtf t “ " in o? 

This is indeed an important ques- 1 on the grace ot God and the so 

- -1 1 1 1 _ nn 


struct his pupils iu various ways, and it is 
the duty of pupils to obey and thus further 
the labor: but by a co-operation of this kind 
that the pupils, parents, or 
community is benefited by it. 1 have been 
somewhat surprised to see Christian parents, 
or at least those who profess to be, take an 
interest in exercises of this kind ; parents 
who pay particular attention to humility ; 
who me opposed to their children attending 


.. ™V„V D h*r ™ Zhtte a ! wisely ordained plan of salvation; ^g^XUing notes. Is it possibl 
tion, and lias, no 1 ^ / .and this is exactly what the Savior that we who live in this enlightened countn 

cause of much serious di < y ^ j j ^ ^ teach so impressively to have snch unenlightened people as to op- 
many a weak, yet to some extent C 1^ John 14 : ‘>6. it is peso the singing of notes? The very tunes 

sincere mind I will, therefore, by ; dismpies m 1 debire t0 sing are principally 

the help of God, try to give some said’ ties 3 “aiiu<iw- - V our romem- derived from notes. But to a public ex- 
light on this subject. Now, dear j and hnn a all t 1 hibitiou they will allow their children to go 

reader, in order to understand r Vim that God *h»t P ublicl y ?PP ear 0 " the ff e; . 

rectly the more difficult passages of to you. Thus it is plain j in ,h e way of exhibiting speaking tatoe- 

the Scriptures, we must in the first in Ins decree I hooJ , eV eo swe3ring and blaspheming. 

- M 1 plan of redemption through t.u l>0 ssible that you, parents who want to 

above-mentioned power, whicn is Uve a ‘ rc <- pec tablc life do not see this in a 

called the IloW Ghost, designs to (lil y orcnt b „ bt ? Can you thus stand m 

bring us, in the first place, to a your own linht? “What concord hath 

knowledge of the fact, that we are, I ebrist with belial? or what part hath he 

, ,, _ Tn.nvpvfni I by nature, all sinners, and that if that believeth with an infidel, \\hereton* 

and then _ read with a pray | )e made liappv, we I come out. from among them, and be ye sop- 

heart, relying on Grod for wisdom j we ' _ obtain of him I aK .tc, raith the Lor, 1, end touch not the 

and strength, and the way will be ; ^“5 an f sins . Hence, we midcnn thins! and I will receive jen, 

nnoTipd to a nroner understanding torgiyeness onjj . <\, r 15— 17. Some may think they 

' -e but voting children, they do not belong 


1 11 ID UL1 m v jj* v 

place be careful to observe and com- 
prehend what was the character of 
the class of people who were ad- 
dressed, and what tlie occasion was 
that called forth the saying or reply ; 
and then read with a prayerful 

L 4- tml tti n rr ( Xf\ (I -fir-vr wisdom 


opened to a proper understanding n m \ Scribes 

of the same. First, it is said, “The see that he rad bmbw | ^ ^ . 

blasphemy againsf the Holy Ghost know i n y, •_ - \ t , any Christian faith, but remember you 

shall not be forgiven unto .men.” | Piously >-ejec ed th.s so ^ ^ ^ then Head eome o 

tbe proverbs of Solomon to his son. lie 
not thou envious 


„„ forgiven unto men. 1 -- o 1 

The occasion that prompted this ex- ; essential power of God, b> which 
pression, consisted in the fact that tlie Savior himsdt “ e 
a man in this frame of mind shall and performed so many 
not, nor indeed can he, obtain for- before nnlieard ofm aclesU! loun 
giveness either in this world or in whid^he meant to^nce^hem, 

the world to come y> because he net u louo -h ve believe not me, believe 
ther seeks nor desires forgiveness. Bllt they , as beforesaid, 

But notwithstanding all this, it is I tl ^ V, o,.,;,. umm,- knnwlodcre. 

beyond doubt, that every oin 
is moved by the kindly ottered w 
of God, and, becoming troubled on 
account of his salvation, seeks the 


a^aiust evil men, neither 
desire to be with "them ; for their heart 

studieth destruction, and their lips talk oi 

mischief,” Prov. 24: 1,2. .,lt JOU thus ad- 

monish your chiklrcn, an important step is 
made and they arc not so apt to indulge , 
but instead of this, some say. If we send our 


n lu tne WOI KS. mn Uici , 1 , nut luaiu.i'i ... . , ^ , - , 

1 th ’ tw contrary to their better knowledge, 0 bildren to school the teacher must decide 

iy one that ^^Jalicioasly rejected all this, 1 to learn them. Th» b true, ho ought 
)ftered grace notomy mam \ . u y .i t a ! , . d ul ,ioss the parents co-operate 

troubled on . but even ascribed the same to t he to h iioi. , , « , t ll ; Wren ,,-ili not 



i ctat 111 tllO laiin* a / 

the great difficulty with the Scribes derstood me, what i 

_ G- — . • rni -| _ • J i 1 ^ ^ iv.ivnnt lur tllP. I > I 51 . > 


and "Pharisees Vy "derfred ‘nol | be meant bft^biasplmmy against »» -toy of .Wev 

forgi^“nd lienee thfs Spence the Holy Oh ost; nainely ^that^it , ^ 

concerning the blasphemy against consists no nature that I . ; ve rc^.-'t him he will soon overwhelm 

the Holy Ghost was pronounced di- 1 or deed that is ot su » • 0 i | ; ; t( .> ao0 M 10 u<c is coming near home. 

rectly against the Scribes and Phan- j it cannot xl, Tiv no i ir«.. wuld not adhere to some things so 

ightly over others 
'.faculties. Let us 

S. R. 


wnen it is saia ui leieiciucc w cuo , m D - 

creation, “The Spirit of God,” &c., 1 forgiveness. 


Youth Is the seed-time for the rest of lite 



• 88 


hueir/J^lid of tbtjth. 


Jfttttt 


itralb of ®rntlj. 


Elkhart, Ind., June 1872. 

To ock Subscribers. — If any of our subscribers Jo not 
get their papers regularly, or if any persons who send ior 
books, Ac., do not Obtain them in due time, they will confer 
a favor by informing us, and we will do our best to have 
everything properly forwarded to its destination. 

How to bend Monet. — I f in sums more than a dollar, it 
Is best to obtain either a draft, or a Post Office money 
order, or where these cannot be obtained, get the letter 
registered. 


As this work is a valuable one, setting 
forth the faith, doctrine and practice of the 
early Christians, together with their belief on 
baptism, &c., it is to be hoped that our peo- 
ple will take an active interest in the matter 
and thus help to spread abroad the truth. 

J. F. Funk & Bro. 


Those of our subscribers who do not wish to take the 
ncrald of Truth any longer, will please to inform us of 
the fact by letter and pay up all arrearages, and the 
matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it will 
oe considered that they wish to continue their subscriptions 


Menno Simon’s Complete Works, in 

the English language are now ready for de- 
livery. All who wish to obtain this valua- 
ble work may have it promptly forwarded 
to them, by sending in their orders to this 
office. The price of the work is $4.50 cents 
per copy. Any person taking 12 copies 
will receive one gratis. We have gone to a 
great expense in translating and publishing 
the work, so that our people might have the 
opportunity to examiine and read the wri- 
tings of the eminent reformer whose name 
our church bears, and we hope our friends 
will feel an interest in selling as many copies 
as possible. Single copies of the work may 
be sent by mail, and those wishing to have 
them thus sent will please add G4cts to the 
price for postage. It may be obtained at 
the following places: 

.T. E. Barr’s Bookstore, Lancaster, Pa. 

J. C. Hunsicker, Berlin, Waterloo co., Ont. 

Jacob Funk, near Line Lexington, Bucks 
county, Pa. 

Jacob N. Brubaker, Mount Joy, Lancas- 
ter county, Pa. 


Bro. John Lapp of Williamsville,Erie 
county, N. Y. writes under the date of May 
Gth,. “We had Conference here on Friday 
last (May 3rd). There were four brethern 
here from Ontario, two of them from Wil- 
mot. We had meeting on Saturday and 
Sunday ; they were well attended and 
we have reason to believe that the Lord 
was with us. — May he bless the seed sown 
so that it may be fruitful in every heart.” 


service in the field, they desire to place 
themselves and their children within the 
pale of free institutions and the guaranty of 
religious liberty. The laws of Russia forbid 
the emigration of a subject without the 
consent of the authorities, and it remains to 
be seen what course the Mennonites can 
safely adopt. The addition of a mass so 
compact and so virtuous to the industrial 
forces of Canada or the United States would 
be of the highest benefit.” 


Conference in Ohio. 


The Word Amen is a Hebrew word sig- 
nifying certanly, truly, surely, so be it, let it 
be done, &c. Our Lord is called “the Amen, 
the faithful and true witness.” It is used 
often by our Savior at the beginning of a 
sentence by way of emphasis, and is com- 
monly translated verily. As “Verily, 
Verily I say unto you.” Ac. 


The Bloody Theatre or Martyr’s 
Mirror in English. 

Inasmuch as there have been many inqui- 
ries recently for the Martyr’s Mirror in the 
English language, we now make a proposal 
to reprint the same, providing a sufficient 
number of subscribers can be obtained. The 
size of the hook will be about 8 by ll inch- 
es, will contain about 1 000 double column 
pages; bound in leather, and will cost $5,00 
Any person taking 12 copies will obtain the 
thirteenth copy free. 

With the present issue of our paper we 
will send subscription circulars, and those 
receiving them we hope will try and get as 


The Mennonites in Russia. 

find the following in one of the Chicago 
dailies. Whether the information relating 
to our brethren in Russia is altogether reli- 
able we are not able at the present time to 
say, hut for the most part, we have no doubt 
it is correct. 

“A letter from St Petersburg announces 
that the Mennonito colonies in Southern 
Russia, comprising fully 40,000 persons, 
are seeking homes in the New World, to 
escape the obligations of military service, 
and have already presented petitions to the 
British and American Governments, asking 
on what terms they will be received. This 
sect was founded in the Low Countries, in the 
sixteenth century, by Menno Simon, a 
priest, who abandoned Catholicism, and 
taught that war was unlawful and military 
service, sinful. In l5Gl, they migrated from 
Holland to East Prussia. Here they were 
subjected to persecutions, which, in 1789 
culminated in a decree forbidding them to 
purchase landed property. By invitation 
of Catharine II., the lareer part of the colo- 
nists removed to tho Lower Dnieper, in 
Russia, being granted various privileges, 
including freedom of worship and exemp- 
tion from military service. The emigrants 
were constantly joined by colonists from 
Prussia until 1817. Under the protection 
and lavor of the Russian Government, they 
have preserved almost intact their German 
character and institutions, and are noted 
as industrious, intelligent, and peaceful. 


According to previous appointment the 
Annual Conference of the State of Ohio, 
met at Nold’s Meeting-house, near Letonia, 
in Columbiana co., on Friday, May 17th. 
A considerable nnmber of persons were 
present, among whom were eight bishops. 
In the remarks of the bishops to the Con- 
ference, especial attention was directed to 
the great responsibility resting upon those 
who are set as watchmen upon the walls of 
Zion, and the great importance of their 
work, as teachers and examples to the flock. 
They should see well to it that they build 
on the true foundation, which is Christ 
Jesus, and on no other; for. they must be 
called to account for what they do ; they 
should all endeavor to be of one mind and 
to teach the same doctrine. Dissension and 
\y e j envy should be avoided ; love, harmony and 
peace Bhould prevail among the children of 
God, and the followers of Jesus. Non-con- 
formity to the world should be observed in 
all things, in habits, manners, dress, the 
beard, &c. Especially should all brethren 
avoid the wearing of the mustache. Firm- 
ness, faithfulness, and unwavering fidelity 
to tho cause of Christ should characterize 
all God’s children ; their yea, should be 
yea, and their nay, nay. The principles of 
a non-resistent Christianity should be strictly 


adhered to ; a life of purity, of love, of 
meekness and humility of heart should man- 
ifest itself in those who are the followers of 
Jesus, &c., &c., &c. 

On Saturday, May 18th, I believe a num- 
ber of persons were to be baptized and re- 
ceived into the church in this vicinity. Wc 
hope many more will follow their example, 
so that indeed the number of God's children 
may be increased, and the borders of Zion 
extended. 

We started for home on the evening of 
the day of Conference and arrived there 
safely on Saturday evening. We feel 
thankful to our heavenly Father for his 
great mercy and goodness unto us, and may 
God bestow his rich blessing upon all his 
children everywhere. J. F. Funk. 

Conference in Illinois. 


many subscribers as possible and return the 
paper to us at their earliest convenience, so ' Now that their privileges are infringed, and 
that we may know how many will he needed. I it is demanded that the, Mennonites render 


Agreeable to previous appointment, the 
Conference for Illinois met in the Menno- 
nito Meeting-house, several miles north of 
Sterling, in Whiteside county, 111., on Frb 
day the 24th of May, where some eighteen 


1872 


HERALD OF TBUTH. 


89 


Bishops, ministers and deacons, from Indi- . 
ana, Illinois and Missouri were present. 
The Conference met at about nine o’clock, 
and a number of subjects were taken into 
consideration. Every thing was discussed 
with the greatest love and harmony, and we 
have reason to believe that it was to the 
edification of all present. This is indeed a 
subject of the greatest importance, that in 
all such meetings unanimity and harmony 
should prevail. To inculcate peaco and 
love, gather souls to Christ, build Zion 
and glorify God, is the great work of all 
God’s ministers, and to this end may we all 
labor and pray. 

On Saturday forenoon there was preach- 
ing at the same place. Likewise on Sunday, 
a large and attentive audience was present 
again at the same place where the word of 
life was set fort in the English language, 
and we have reason to believe that our ef- 
forts were not in vain. 

On tho same day communion services 
were held near Morrison, in the same county, 
where also a goodly number were present. 
May God bless our efforts and grant that 
souls may be converted unto God. 


The Amish Mennonlte Conference. 



A Visit to the State of New York. 


According to previous appointment, the 
brethren of the Amish church met for the 
purpose of holding their annual Conference, 
in the largo barn of Samuel D. Miller, in 
Lagrange county, Indiana, on Sunday, the 
19th of May, where there was preaching 
both in the forenoon and in the afternoon, 
and a large concourse of people were pres- 
ent. 

On Monday the business of the Confer- 
ence was commenced and continued until 
Wednesday afternoon, when the meeting ad- 
journed. 

Some 57 Bishops, ministers and deacons 
were present, who helped to labor in the im- 
portant duties devolving upon them. Though 
a large number of people were present 
during the time of tho meeting, good order 
was preserved, and many edifying discourses 
were delivered from various persons present, 
especially were many solemn and affecting 
warnings and appeals made to all present, 
but especially to the young. "W o have rea- 
son to believe the blessing of God was with 
the meeting and that that which was done 
was to the honor and glory of his great name 
and tho upbuilding of his church here on 
earth. 

For especial information ou what was 
done, we refer the reader to the regular 
minutes of the meeting which will ho pub- 
lished in a short time, and will be sent to 
all the churches, so that all who wish, may 
obtain a copy. 

We truly hope this meeting may have 
been of lasting benefit to all who were pres- , 
ent upon the important occasion. 

J. F. Funk. I 


On Saturday, the 6th day of April, I 
went to Hawpatch, Lagrange Co., Ind., to 
assist iu the funeral services of two of S. 
Erb’s children who had died of small-pox. 
We stayed over night with Pre. Hartzler; ' 
thence went to Pre. Schmucker’s and yet 
the same day attended the meeting above 
referred to, which was largely attended, and 
we could feel indeed (though many tears 
of affectionate love were shed at the re- 
membrance of the departed), that •* it is 
better to go to the house of mourning than 
to tho house of feasting.” From here the 
brethren conveyed us to Pretty Prairio. 
From there Pre. Naffsinger took us to the 
vicinity of the brethren near Burr Oak, 
Mich., where wo attended three meetings, 
after which we proceeded on our way to Erie 
co., N. Y., meeting, according to previous 
agreement, Bro. J. F. Funk on the train. 
Bro. Funk having already given to the 
readers of tho Herald some of the particu- 
lars relative to our visit, I will not enlarge 
in that direction. Fora long time has it 
been my desire and intention to visit our 
brethren in New Fork, but not until now 
was it my happy privilege so to do; although 
several times 1 passed through the city of 
Buffalo, within twelve miles of some of the 
brethren. My visit there has indeed been 
to me a source of pleasuro and enjoyment. 
The acquaintances formed with the many 
warm-hearted friends there, I trust I shall 
never forget. Our time here was only too 
short until we had to say farewell, and pro- 
ceed on our way. I have felt specially in- 
terested with regard to the many young 
people, and even older ones ; descendants of 
Mennonite parents, who are still standing 
outside the pales of the church, to whom, 
prompted by a sense of duty, I have taken 
occasion to speak, with regard to the “ oue 
thing needful.” I trust our intercourse will 
not soon be forgotten, but that they will 
practically adhere to the impressions made, 
as evinced by the flowing of tears, aud that 

it may result in good. 

If I live and tho Lord will, it is my de- 
siro and intention to pay a second visit to 
this place. In tho mean time let us pray 
that God may direct us in all things to the 
•dory and praise of his name. "NVe had in- 
tended accompanying Bro. Funk to Canada 
on Monday morning, but in consequence of 
tho funeral of George Snearly on Tuesday, 
wo consented, in compliance with the re- 
quest of the bereaved sister, to stay until 
after the funeral, which was very largely at- 
tended, and we trust the impressions 
brought to bear upon tho minds of the sol- 
emn 'assembly, generally, by the example of 
our mortality, as presented to our view, will 
long be remembered. Tho same day, ac- 
companied by friend Witraer, wo proceeded 


to Suspension Bridge, and in the evening 
we went to Bro. Abraham W itmer s, with 
whom we spent the night most pleasantly. 
Their desire was that we should remain with 
them for a time, and hold meetings in their 
neighborhood, which would have been grat- 
ifying to us, but our time was too limited. 

Leaving them the promise that if God 
permit I would visit them at some other 
time, we bade them farewell. This brother 
who had accompanied us from Erie co., now 
concluded to go with us to Canada, so after 
taking a view of the Niagara falls and tho 
suspension bridge, with their many sur- 
roundings and magnificent sceneries, wo 
took the train at Suspension Bridge and 
proceeded homeward, meeting Bro. Funk 
at St. Catharines. At Bothwell, friend 
Witmer (I trust wo may soon call him 
brother, judging from his feelings expressed 
to me), and Bro. Funk left the train to visit 
tho brethern in that neighborhood, whilst 
we proceeded to Detroit, stayed over night, 
and in the morning proceeded homeward, 
arriving in the evening, and, the name ot 
the Lord be praised, we found all well. 
May God bless the brethren, and indeed all 
with whom it was our happy privilege to 
meet and form an acquaintance. Farewell. 

Elkhart , Ind. Daniel Brenneman. 

^ 

For tho Herald of Truth. 

1 

A Letter. 


Dear Bro. Diller, It is now my happy 
privilege, and I believe my duty, to write 
to you, though I should have written sooner, 
but I hope you will pardon me and pray 
God to aid me in doing my duty. 

On the morning after leaving you I went 
to Grand Rapids. There I met two of my 
old companions, William and Abraham 
Overholt, and that evening we went to their 
father’s; some of the neighbors had gathered 
in, and wo spent the time pleasantly. 
On Sunday evening we visited Bro. John 
Lcatherman aud the next day his broth- 
er-in-law, and the day following, by the 
grace of God, 1 arrived safely at home, and 
L thank the Lord that he so kindly pro- 
tected both me and my family, so that wc 
could meet again in the enjoyment of health 
and strength. 

To all the ministers who may have 
an opportunity to do so, 1 would say, il 
possiblo stop and visit Bro. Diller. lie lives 
near St. Johns, in Clinton county, Michi- 
gan. Ho may easily be found by inquir- 
ing for him at St. Johns. They desire very 
much to bo visited, especially by those who, 
have the ability to speak in English, as the 
people thereabouts understand only the 
English language. 

Tho preachers are called to preach tho 
gospel to all nations, therefore l think it 
their duty to go to such places where there 
are no regularly ordained ministers, and 
where tho gospel of Christ is not brought to 
light as it should be. By this means there 
might, in due time, churches be established 




HEBALD OP TRUTH. 


guiu 


in such places, and the true gospel of Jesus 

Christ might be made known unto all men, and 

many poor souls brought to Christ and live. 

Dear brethren and sisters, let us all stand 
firm and help one another, and encourage 
and pray for one another, that the Cord may * 
grant us wisdom and understanding that 
we may daily build upon the rocj^, Christ 
Jesus, who is the foundation and the chief 
corner stone of our building. Oh, my 
Christian friends let us not fall back upon a 
weaker foundation, but stand firm and un- 
shaken, so that wheu we are called away 
from this world of sorrow and affliction, we 
may all meet in that better world above, 
where all is peace aud happiness ; where 
sorrow aud afflictions and temptations and 
tribulations arise no more. 

Elkhart , Ind. Jacob Long. 

Letter. 

McPherson Co., Kansas. 

• 4 . 

Dear Friends, brethren and sisters in the 1 
Lord, I feel very thankful for the kindness J 
which you manifested towards us at tbo I 
time of our departure from you. 

“ Your love to me has beeu most lree, 
your conversation sweet,” hut now 1 am 
gone and am here almost alone, yes, we are 
here almost as sheep without a shepherd, 
but I hope you will not forget us in your 
prayers, aud also pray the Lord that he may 
send more laborers into his vineyard, for 
the harvest truly is great but the laborers 
are few. 

It is my heart’s desire that more of our 
people would settle hero. 1 like it well 
here, aud only wi->h that some more of our 
old friends and neighbors were here, and 
we could get a Sabbath-school organized. 
It would be a great satisfaction to us. I 
have already been thinking about starting 
one if the neighbors are willing and wo can 
get suitable books. 

I trust our beloved shepherds will not 
forget the scattered sheep. 

“O may we meet and be complete, 
And long together dwell; 

And serve the Lord with one accord, 
And so dear friends farewell ” 

From your friend, 

Michael Kilmkk. 


Job's Patience. 

" But ho knowetli tho way that I lake; 
when Ini hath tried me, 1 shall como 
forth as gold,” Job 23 : 10. 

Dear reader, have you ever thor- 
oughly studied the history of Job’s 
trials, afflictions and patience, or 
have you been bendited by the les- 
sons they teach us ? Every human 
being that journies through life’s 
thorny path, experiences more orless 
of afflictions; but the afflictions of 
Job, as it appears to me, exceed all 
others recorded in Divine writ It is 


natural the greater height from tl 
which a man falls, tlie greater will be c 
the in jury; soalsothegreateraman’s u 
change from prosperity to adversity, tl 
the greater will be the effect. s 

Let us consider for a moment the 0 
change which Job underwent. Job e 
as it appears was the richest man of J 1 
all the East, whose riches consisted 1 
of a great number of sheep, cattle, s 
and a great many servants and ^ 
hired hands to tend his flocks; with 1 
a wife, seven sons and three daugh- 
ters; indeed every thing that ren- £ 
ders life comfortable in this world c 
was within his reach. The candle c 
of God, he says, shone on him; his f 
blessing rested upon him and pre- 1 
served him through light and dark- 1 
ness. He says, “I washed my steps > 
with butter, and the rock poured me : 
out rivers of oil.” God granted him i 
I wisdom and honor. He was respect- 5 

I ed at home and abroad ; yea, the < 
Almighty called him his just and < 
upright servant. He was eyes to the 1 
blind and feet to the lame; a father 1 
to the poor; and sat chief, and dwelt 1 
as a king in the army. Thus we see 1 
that his rank or position could not ' 
have been much higher on earth. : 
Now this teaches us that those who ! 
are blessed with riches and pros- , 
perity are in great danger of the 
adversary who had all the time his 
eye on Job, and accused him of 
serving God only because God 
blessed him. Satan said to the Al- 
mighty, “Hast not thou made a 
hedge about him, and about his 
house, and about all that lie hath 
on every side? thou hast blessed tlie 
work of his hands, and his substance 
is increased in the land; but put 
fortli thy hand now, and touch all 
that he hath, and he will curse thee 

i to thy face.” In order to try Job, 

| God permitted Satan to destroy all 
.that he had, “only upon himself 
put not forth thine hand.” Satan 
■ had soon accomplished his work of 
destruction, lie slew Job's children 
and servants, that not a friend, 

; house or home was left him. But 
0 did Job curse God as tno arch-ene- 
my claimed lie would? nay: he hum- 
- bled himself, worshiped God, and 
s exclaimed, “Naked came I out of 
r my mother’s womb, and naked shall 
| 1 return thither: the Lord gave and 

II the Lord hath taken away; blessed 
s be the name of the Lord.” 

s Now when God gave him pennis- 
>f sion, Satan smote Job with a loath- 
11 some disease from his foot unto his 


crown. Then said his wife, “Host 


thou still retain thine integrity? 
curse God and die. ’ Hut he said 
unto her, Thou speakest as one of 
the foolish women speaketh. What! 
shall we receive good at the hand 
of God, and shall we not receive 
evil? This teaches us that we should 
not murmur at our troubles, because 
they are never permitted but for 
some valuable end. “All things 
work together for good to them that 
love God,” Horn. 8 : ‘28. 

Now Job’s grief was indeed severe 
and overwhelming. The report there- 
of soon spread in the surrounding 
country, and caused three of Job's 
friends to visit him ; and when they 
first saw him they knew him not, 
because the change of his condition 
was so great. The greatest man of 
all the East had now become the 
most miserable. They found him 
sitting among the ashes, his flesh 
clothed with worms and clods of 
dust, scraping himself with a pot- 
sherd. This caused them to rent every 
one his mantle, and sprinkle dust 
upon their heads and sit in silence 
with him, weeping seven days. Who 
when on the couch of affliction does 
not feel happy when liis friends visit 
him? bnt this was not the case with 
Job; he says, “miserable comfort- 
ers are ye,” “how long will ye vex 
my soul and break me in pieces 
with words.” Job claimed to be 
righteous, and believed in a resur- 
rection of the soul, a future punish- 
ment of the wicked and reward of 
. the just, while his friends claimed 
1 that the wicked received all their 
■ punishment in this world, Job 20; 

5 they accused him of violence, injus- 
t tice and hypocrisy; counted him a 
I liar and mocker, which indeed add 
i ed to the grief of one who was re 
, duced from affluence to penury, and 
1 bereft of every thing near and dear 
f to him. He now begins to bemoan 
1 his miserable condition; he says, 
f “I am as one mocked of his neigh- 
1 bor;” “ my friends scorn me;” “the) 

, abhor me, they flee far from me. 
t and spare not to spit in my face." 

- “ God hath stripped me of my glory. 

- and taken the crown from my head." 
.1 “My breath is strange to my wife." 
>f “ Thou scarest me with dreams and 
1 terrifiest me through visions,” and 
d “my bones are pierced in the night 
d season, and my sinews take no rest." 

“I am a brother to dragons and a 
3 - companion to owls.” “They that 
1 - are younger than I, have had me in 
s derision, whose fathers I would have 
?t disdained to have set with the dogs 


91 


1872 


TT-FTR, A T ,~n OF TBUTH. 


of my flock.” “Corruption, thou art 
m y father ; worm, thou art my 
mother.” J* 

But in all his afflictions Job main- 
tained his integrity. “Till I die I 
will not remove mine integrity,” was 
his language. He looked with com- 
posure to tlie tomb which he called 
the “ house appointed for all living.” 
The heathen regarded it as their 
eternal home; but Job with better 
knowledge considered it as a resting 
place where he should have to wait, 
but not for ever. He says, “Thou 
shalt call and I will answer thee; 
thou wilt have a desire to the work 
of thine own hands.” “I know that 
my Redeemer liveth,” and “In my 
flesh shall I see God,” and as he 
says in the text, “When lie hath 
tried me, I shall come forth as gold.” 

Dear reader, let us remember 
these words, and if we have a little 
trouble, let ns not sink in despair; 
if we are* deprived of some of our 
property, or if sickness tinds its way 
into our midst and death robs us of 
some of our friends that are near 
and dear to us, let us think of this 
venerable patriarch who had not 
only lost all the property that lie 
had in this world, but all his family 
was killed; all his friends forsook 
him, and his mortal body was smit- 
ten with a miserable disease. If it 
would please tlie Almighty to visit 
us with such a dreadful calamity, 
we would not have as much reason 
to complain as Job had. We would 
have to consider it as the wages of 
our sins, because we must acknowl- 
edge ourselves as poor sinners, wliile 
tlie word of God testifies that Job 
was just and upright; and God ac- 
knowledges him as his servant and 
says to Satan, “Thou movedst me 
against him to destroy him without 
cause 




Job was well rewarded for his pa- 
tience, for after his trials he enjoyed 
a hundred and forty years of com- 
fort and prosperity. There came 
unto him all liis brothers and sis- 
ters and all his acquaintance and 
ate bread with him, and his sub- 
stance was increased to double that 
which it was in his former years; 
and he saw his sons and sons’ sons 
even four generations. Then let us 
take Job as an example, and in our 
suffering exclaim hitli him, “When 
he hath tried me, I shall come forth 
as gold." 

David Burkholder. 

Locke, Ind. 


For tho Herald of Truth. 

Receiving the Spirit. 

“And he made haste, and came down, 
and received him joyfully,” Luke 19: 6. 

Zaccheus, being desirous of seeing Jesus 
but could not for the multitude, for he was 
a small man, climbed into a tree which stood 
by the way. What ever his motive, his 
perseverance and determinations were com- 
mendable. We may learn a lesson from 
him which will be of great value to us in 
seeking Jesus. Christ does not reward the 
indifferent Beeker, with that fullness of grace 
which he alone can bestow. We muBt seek 
earnestly to find him, labor perseveringly to 
approach nearer him, make use of all natural j 
advantages to give us a better view of our 
blessed Master. 

It matters not what we have beeu in the 
past, though the most despised publican, 
though the greatest sinner, though we have | 
climbed to dizzy heights, aud that over the 
prostrate bodies of our brethren, to secure 

worldly honor, and applause of men. To-day, 

he says, Make haste and come down. To- 
day you need a Savior,. To-day I wish to 
sup with you. “To-day if ye hear my voice, ! 
harden not your hearts.” Will you, like 
Zaccheus though vile and unclean, receive 
Jesus joyfully ? What guest so worthy 
your supreme respect ? What friend has 
such strong and undeniable claims on your 
affection? He who has redeemed you from 
death and destruction asks now to be re- 
ceived as a friend, as a welcomo guest. ( 
Will you deny him ? Will you be guilty , 
of such base ingratitude as not to receive 
him joyfully ? Have you heard Christ 
bidding you come down from those high 
positions to which self avarice and ambi- 
tion have exalted you, and made you an 
abomination in the sight of the Lord ? 

If in the past you have seut the spirit 
grieved and insulted away ; beware, for 
The spirit so grieved may never return. If 
Jesus calls to-day, make haste aud receive 
him joyfully before he takes his final de- 
parture, and leaves you in darkest despair. 
At times you have made ready to receivo 
him and opened your doors to bid him wel- 
come. Did ho enter ! Have you the abid- 
ing witness that you are a child of Cod ? 
Notice the great change in the character of 
Zaccheus. Though a rich man, he says, 
Lord, I give half to the poor. Charity is 
first to assert its claim. This becomes tbo 
ruling motive in the Christian heart. Think 
not your salvation is sure unless you have 
the disposition to give to tho poor ; to re- 
lieve their wants and distress. Men who 
have not charity have not the love of God 
in their hearts. . - . 

Zaccheus showed immediate fruits of the 
Spirit and we, if sincere in our profession, 
must do likewise. Further evidence was 
(riven by his willingness to return fourfold 
all he had dishonestly taken. The Christian 
is ever willing to do all in his power to un- 
do what he has done amiss; our power to 
do this is very limited, but Jesus has 


promised that if we follow in his footsteps 
and willingly bear the cross he will remem- 
ber our iniquities against us no more. To- 
day he says, “Behold, I stand at the door 
and knock ; if any man hear my voice, and 
open the door, I will come in to him, and 
sup with him, and he with me.” Make 
haste and receive him joyfully. R- 

^ ■ — 

For tbo Herald of Truth. 

Lines 

! on the death of iny brother, John H. Cui,p, 
who died on the 17th ot March 
1872, in Elkhart Co., Ind. 

I always loved a pleasant spot, 

Where John and I were wont to meet ; 
At home, abroad, and e’en tho street, 

For all seemed dark wbero ho was not. 

I can’t speak for the one that died, 

How he has seemed unto others ; 

But to me, like more than brothers, 

And more than all the world beside 

But 0, one day against our will, 

His eyes in death began to roll ; 

And then an angel took his soul, 

The pale brow grew cold, — colder still. 

The broken hearts begin to bleed, 

We all watched him with ardent gaze ; 
We loved our dying brother’s face, 

But ah, his life had ceased indeed'. 

And then como they that bore his head 
That sleeps, or wears the masks of sleep ; 
Then followed thoso who had to weep, 
To see the ritual of the dead. 

And now we’re grieving for the past, 
And now we’re in our sorrows shut ; 

We loved our brother dearly, but 
Saw him sink in the grave at last. 

And now in converse is there none, 

So much the vital spirits sink, 

To see the vacant chair and thiuk, 

How good, how kind, and ho is gone. 

But this alono on death 1 wreak 
The grief that rises iu my heart; 

It put our lives so far apart, 

We cannot hear each other speak. 

For thou ,dear brother, hadst to leave, 
And now thy lonely grave is made ; 
Thou in the silent gravo art laid, 

But yet wo ought not thus to grieve. 

For pure now aro thy joys above. 

From sickness aud pain thou art lree ; 

1 Sorrow and care thou ne’er shalt see, 
Our friend, our brother, and our love. 

Saraii Cui.p 


Why Live Beneath Our Privileges? 

Is it not an incontrovertible fact that lua- 

! ny the majority — of the professors of relig- 

i ion live beneath their privileges, and, in- 
deed, do not aim at what is their perogative? 

| Great blessings, enlarged blessings, aro pro- 
vided and laid in store for all who love Je- 
I aua Christ; great blessings aro promised, 


92 



FT 'FIT?, A.X/D OF TBFTB.. 


gUttC 


and may be obtained by the believer ; liigli 
attainments may be made by those who 
strive after them ; progress in experience 
may be made; growth in knowledge and grace 
is our privilege ; perfection in holiness is 
our high calling, happiness, comfort, peace 
and joy in the Lord is our prerogative ; and 
yet how few attain to it. Much is provided 
for all, but little is enjoyed by many ; much 
is promised, but little claimed. F lo be a 
perfect man, to attain unto the measure of 
the stature of the fullness of Christ ; to be 
filled with all the fullness of God is our 
Savior’s good will and pleasure, and yet how 
many dwarfs in religion, how little growth, 
infancy, life-long infancy, seems to be the 
ideal of religious experience, and the highest 
conception of advancement that many mani- 
fest. To walk with God is our privilege, 
yet how few follow him fully, and enjoy him 
in his gracious presence continually. There 
is a feast prepared for all, yet how many are 
in a starving condition. A table is spread 
with marrow and fatness, and cups running 
over, yet many are satisfied with the crumbs. 
There* is bread enough and to spare in the 
Father’s house, yet many eat husks. The 
righteous shall go in and out, find pasture, 
and grow up as calves of the stall — shall 
Uourish — and yet how many are constrained 
to cry out; “Oh, my leanness, my leanness.” 
God has promised much, is ready to give 
much, waits to fulfill his promise; but how 
few aim at much, desire much, grasp, real- 
ize, experience all that is within their reach. 

Why is all this? Why seek so little when 
so much is offered ? Why live so far be- 
neath our privilege in knowledge, experi- 
ence, holiness and enjoyment? Come, rouse 
yourself, shake off your lethargy, be no 
longer satisfied with meager attainments, 
seek enlarged blessings, open your mouth 
wide. God will fill it, aim high, strive 
manfully, expect much, be strong in faith, 
grasp the prize. Leave the murky streams 
and come right to the fountain, llo, every 
one that is athirst, come ! drink of the 
waters of life freely. “Come, all things are 
now ready” Come, there yet is room. 
Come, be filled with all the fullness of God. 
Come, seek the enjoyment of the religion 
of Jesus. Claim all that Christ has pur- 
chased for you, claim all that Cod has 
promised. It is for you, then claim it as 
yours, in the name of Jesus, claim it now, 
claim it all, lay hold of it by faith, grow up 
in Christ in all things, live up to your 
privilege, and you live happy. Come, be 
filled with glory and with God till the vessel 
caw hold no more. It is your privilege so to 
do, it is your duty. Why live so lar be- 
neath your privilege ? — Evany. Messenycr. 

Meekness cannot well be counterfeited. 
It is not unmanlincss — it is not servility — it 
does not cringe — it does not whine. It is 
benevolence imitating the God man in pa- 
tience, forbearance and quietness. It has 
no connection with insensibility. It feels 
keenly, but not malignantly. It abounds in 
good-will. It bears all things. 


A hidden light soon becomes dim, and if ; 
it is entirely covered up, will expire for want 
of air. So it is with hidden religion. It 
must go out. There cannot be a Christian 
where light in some aspect does not shine. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

To the loung. 


WISE CHILDREN TARE ADVICE. 

“ A wise son inaketh a glad father ; 
hut a foolish son is the heaviness of 
his mother,” Prov. 10: 1- 

Wise children are a blessing to their 
parents. “ The lather of the righteous shall 
greatly rejoice; and he that begetteth a wise 
child shall have joy of him. Thy father 
and thy mother shall be glad, and she that 
bare thee shall rejoice,” Prov. 23:24,25. 
O, how much better it would be in this 
world, how much more pleasant, if all sons 
and daughters would be more obedient to 
the counsel of their parents. I have often 
thought how great a burden and heavy care 
children could prevent if they would be 
obedient to their father and mother. But 
how is it in a general way, with the children 
and youth in this time? Do they not walk 
after the world, follow its foolish and vain 
fashions, lusts and pleasures, on the broad 
road to destruction ? A wise son regards 
the advice and instruction of his parents; 
but a mocker and unruly son regards not 
the advice and punishment of his parents. 
They would sooner leave or fun away from 
their parents, and thus make their affliction 
and heart-rending greater. 

Think of it, dear young friends, how 
great is the love of a father and mother ; 
you who are a sou or daughter, ought, with 
the full measure of gratitude, return your 
affection ; you are bound to them by the 
strongest ties ; treat them with never-failing 
tenderness ; they will love you whatever be 
your character, but let them have cause to 
glory in their child. Disappoint not their 
hopes; do not, by your vices plunge a 
sword into their bosoms; do not break their 
hearts ; do not compel them to wish that 
God would hide them in the grave. Look 
unto J esus, the pattern of every excellence; 
love your parents as the children of God ; 
obey, honor, cherish and protect them, as 
Jesus obeyed his earthly parents. If you 
do this in respect, you will resemble the 
Holy Child Jesus. Finally, imprint on 
your mind the words of the wise man, “ lie 
that is obedient unto the Lord will be a 
comfort to his mother,” “ My son, hear the 
instruction of thy father, and forsake not 
the law of thy mother; for they shall be an 
ornament of grace unto thy head, and chains 
about thy neck,” Prov. 1 : 8, 9. The com- 
mand of God is, “ Honor thy father and 
mother; and, lie that cuiseth father or 
mother, let him die the death,” Matt. 15:4. 
Therefore, “Children obey your parents in 
the Lord, for this is right; Honor thy 
father and mother, which is the first com- 


mandment with promise; that it may he well 
with thee, and that thou mayest live long on 
the earth,” Eph. 6: 1, 3. 

“ Children obey your parents in all things, 
for this is well-pleasing unto the Lord,” Col. 

3: 20. “Ye shall fear every man his 
mother and his father.” It is also required 
of children to treat the aged persons with 
respect, the Lord said, “Thou shalt rise up 
before the hoary head, and honor the face 
of the old man, and fear thy God ; I am the 
Lord,” Lev. 19: 32. 

The Scriptures also saith, That children who 
are disrespectful to their parents are cursed. 

“ Cursed be he that setteth light by his 
father or his mother,” Deut. 27: 10. 0, how 
many an aged father and dear mother could 
proceed on their journey more peacefully 
and happy if their children would be respect- 
ful and devoted to them. But, oh, how 
sorrowful and grievous it is that we must 
say, that in general we find them to be the 
contrary. Children who are kind,, respect- 
ful and cheerfully obey their parents, take 
tlic way to become a blessing to themselves, 
their parents, the church of God, and the 
world. My advice to you my young friends 
is, turn ye from the wrath to come, and from 
the broad road which leads to death and 
hell. Remember and fear the Lord your 
God. “Remember now thy Creator in the 
days of thy youth, while the evil days come 
not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou 
shalt say, I have no pleasure in them.” If 
you take God for your guide you will not go 
astray. What does God ask you to do now, 
in the days of your youth ? saith, 

“ Wilt thou not from this time cry unto me, 
My father, thou art the guide of my youth,” 
Jer. 3 : 4. God says, “ Those that seek me 
early shall find me.” Thus you sec, that 
you are not too young to serve God. Search 
the Scriptures, “ which are able to make 
thee wise unto salvation through faith which 
is in Christ Jesus.” All who have the Bible, 
and read it carefully, may, if they rightly 
treat it, become wise to salvation ; aud it 
they do not, it will be to their own destruc- 
tion. My young friends, flee from the 
wrath to come, and avoid the terrible calam- 
ities that might befall you. 

Hear what God demands of you: “My 
son, forget not my law, but let thine heart 
keep my commandments, for length of days, 
and long life and peace, shall they add to 
thee. Let not mercy and truth forsake 
thee; bind them about thy neck ; write them 
upou the table of thine heart; so shalt thou 
find favor and good understanding in the 
sight of God and man.” Submit yourself 
to God. “ If ye enduro chastening God 
dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is 
he whom the father chastenetb not? But 
if ye be without chastisement, whereof all 
are partakers (or the children of God), then 
arc ye bastards, and not sons,” you are then 
treated as bastards ; your faults are not cor- 
rected, but you are left to go without ref- 
ormation to ruin. “ Furthermore, we have 
had fathers of our flesh which corrected us, 



1872 


93 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


and we gave them reverence, shall we not 
much rather be in subjection unto the 
Father of Spirits, and live?” 

There are many young people that attend 
meeting year after year, but they are not 
willing to become obedient to the command- , 
ments of God. They fear the world will ! 

laugh at them, they fear that they will 
have to refrain from pride, and things 
pertaining to the pleasures of this Avorld. 
The Scripture says that we are not to be con- 
conformed to this world, its sinful spirit, 
maxims, customs, fashions, and habits. “But 
be ye transformed by the renewing of your 
minds;” that is, be changed, not in outward 
conduct only, but also in the spirit and 
temper of your minds, so “that you may 
prove what is that good and acceptable, and 
perfect will of God.” And again we find 
in 1 Jn. 2: 15—17, “Love not the world, 
neither the things that are in the world, if 
any man love the world, the love of the 
Father is not in him.” To love the world, 
and the things that are in the world, is to 
make them our treasures, and put our trust 
in them, instead of in God. “ lor all that 
is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the | 
lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not 
of the Father.” It does not come from God, 
and is not on his side, but stands in opposi- 
tion to him. He created the world and gave 
it to man to be used in his service, not to 
be abused as the minister ot fleshly lust. 
“But is of the world,” comes from the 
world as the nourisher of earthly lust, and 
is opposed to God and his service. Mark, 
my young friends, “The world passeth 
away, aud the lust thereof,” and should not, 
therefore, be made the object of our love, 

“ But he that doeth the will of God abideth 
for ever.” The sum of true religion and 
our whole duty to God and man is, “Hiou 
shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart, and with all thy soul, and with all 
thy mind, and thou shalt love thy neigh- 
bor as thyself,” Matt. 22: 37, 39, and 
“As you would that men should do 
to you, do ye also to them likewise, Luke 
ti : 31. “ Let us hear the conclusion of the 
whole matter : Fear God, and keep his com- 
mandments ; for this is the whole duty of 
man. For God shall bring every work into 
judgment, with every secret thing, whether 
it be good or whether it be evil,’ Eccl. 12 : 

V / m i a . 1 1 A 


I 

I formed a warm friendship with some of 
them. So I feel that I have a few more 
little friends than I had when L left home. 

I feel sure that little Ella and I are warm 
friends. May God help us to be good that 
we may meet pi that beautiful world above. 
Ella will you try ? I will ask God to 
help you. 

I cannot tell how glad I was to see the 
two little friends I took homo from school. 
I should not have felt satisfied if I had not 
seen them. Try to he good little girls, and 
love J esus, that we may meet where he is. 

In a few weeks I am going to Fairfield 
county, Ohio, to the place where I was born 
and brought up, if it is God’s will, to see 
my old friends there. 

I wish to hear from you often, little 
friends. All try to be good. 

Brother Henry. 


For tho Herald of Truth. 


13, 14. 


(To be continued.) 


^fibrin’s fqmrtnunt. 


My Travels. 

I left home on the second day of May, 
and went to Wayne county, Ohio. After I 
visited there among my friends a few days, 
I went to Holmes county* visited there a 
short time, then returned to Wayne county, 
and there took the train for Columbiana 
county. 

I met with a good many little lolks with 
whom I had never met before, and believe 


A Hard Way. 

“ The way of transgressors is hard,’ - 
Proverbs 13 : 15. 

A transgressor is one who disobeys auy 
laws or coinmandmcuts — one who does what 
lie is told not to do, or does not what he is 
commanded to do. In the above text it 
means those who disobey God and break 
his laws and commandments. 

The way of transgressors is hard, because 
they are punished for every transgression ; 
not only in the world to come, but they are 
punished already in this world. The man 
who steals, breaks one of God’s command- 
ments. It is hard for him to go to his 
neighbor's and steal some meat, or corn, or 
wheat, or whatever he can get his hands 
on; perhaps trembling with fear that some 
one might see him; and often when he 
thinks of it that ho is disobeying God, lie 
feels punished, for be knows that God is 
displeased with him. 

When the drunkard goes to the grogshop, 
aud gets drunk, and quarrels and lights with 
his associates, and gets bis eyes blackened, 
or if on bis way home he falls into the gut- 
ter, or in the mud, and is too drunk to get 
out, and must lie there and freeze ; or if he 
is able to get home and is very hungry and 
has nothing to eat hut a dry crust, because 
he spends all his money to buy strong drink, 
then the way of the transgressor is hard. 

Not long ago I was passing along the 
road one cold day, and saw a man with 
poor, ragged clothes on, lying on a heap of 
stones at the road side, shivering with cold. 

1 As 1 looked upon the poor, wretched man 
| \ thought, “ The way of transgressors is 

hard.” 

I have seen men who bad by lighting or 
stealing or some other way transgressed, 
taken by an officer and led away to be shut 
up in the dark prison, there to sleep on a 
bed of straw or rags, and 1 thought, “ r l be 
i way of transgressors is hard.” 

1 The way of the transgressor is hard, when 


! he lias lived many years in wickedness 
and sin, and the time comes that he must 
' die, and when be looks upon bis past life, 
and thinks how wicked he has been, and 
that God is angry with him, and that Jesus 
is not liis friend, and now he must die and 
go into everlasting punishment. 

Oh, how terrible it must be for such a 
one, when he thinks of it that he can never 
get to heaven, and never have any rest, but 
must remain forever away from God, and 
can never more be happy 

Now dear young friends, I hope you will 
think what a terrible thing it ib to be a 
transgressor. Those who transgress the 
commandments of God have very little 
pleasure or happiness in this world, and 
will have none in the world to come. 

Solomon says, “ The way of the wicked is 
| as darkness,” Prov. 4 : 19. “ The way of 

the wicked is an abomination unto the 
Lord, but he loveth him that followeth after 
righteousness,” Prov. 15 : 9. “ Thorns and 

snares are in the" way of the froward, ’ Prov. 
22 : 5. The word froicard, means disobedi- 
ent. One who takes his own way, and will not 
do as he is told or advised, is a froward 
person. 

My dear young friends, if you do not 
wish to be transgressors, keep away from 
wicked companions ; keep away from those 
who curse and swear, and lie, and quarrel 
and fight, for they will lead you into the 
same wicked habits. “ If sinners entice 
thee, consent thou not,” Prov. 1 : 10. “ En- 
ter not into the path of the wicked, and go 
not in the way of evil men,” Prov. 4 : 14. 
Remember the words, “ The way of trans- 
gressors is hard.” Brother IIenry. 


For the Herald ol Truth. 

Heaven and Hell. 


We all are yet in the early morn- 
[ ing of our existence. Sooner or 
later our bodies will die and return 
to the dust whence they came, but 
I om- souls can never die. Our souls 
is that part of us which feels, thinks, 
hopes, believes, and knows. 

Our life in this world will come to 
an end, but the good word of God 
teaches that, when we leave this 
world we shall go to one of two 
other worlds, where we shall con- 
tinue to be for ever. The good 
Father allows us to choose to which 
of these two worlds we shall go. 

■ And now let me try to tell the little 
folks who read this part of the Her- 
ald, something about these two 
i worlds. 

You have noticed that there are 
two very different kinds of people 
in this world, good people and bad 
' people. God has also provided two 
i worlds as unlike as are these two 


7 


HEIR/A-ILiD OF TBTJTH. 


lutu 


kinds of people. One of these h 
worlds is called heaven, the other, tc 

hell. T 

Heaven is a pure world. No 1 , 
drunkard, no blackguard, no swear- ; 
er, no liar, no cheater, no tlnef, in a * 
word, no bad and impure soul will j V 
ever be permitted to enter heaven. 
God himself is in heaven, and he is 
so pure and holy that he does not 
want, nor will he ever permit the 
presence of the impure and the un- 
holy. . 

Heaven is a happy world. It is 
full of beauty, glory and .joy. Rags, 
loneliness, filth, tears, sorrow, sick- 
ness, sin and death can get no en- 
trance within its glorious walls. It 
will be all love, peace and joy. ij 
Here are burdens, cares, labors, ^ 
anxieties, bereavements, and then 
death. It iB pleasant to have good * 
friends', there we shall have hosts i 
of friends, the best, the kindest, the 
most loving will be God, the good j 
Father, Jesus our Savior, and the 
Holy Spirit the comforter. Angels, 
about whom we can read such beau- 
tiful accounts, prophets, patriarchs, 
and apostles, and all the pious men, 
women, and children that have lived 
in this world are there. None will 
there quarrel, hate, envy, backbite, 
or do any other form of sin, for 
none such will be admitted. 

Heaven is a beautiful world. It 
is likened to a city whose streets 
are of gold, pure and clear as glass. , 
It has no need of sun or moon, for 
the glory of God lightens it. The 
pure river of water of life, clear as 
crystal, flows out of the throne of 
God and of the Lamb. No human 
mind can conceive, nor tongue de- 
scribe the beauty and glory of that 
city. Thus great are the joys to 
which we are all invited. 

Those who neglect and refuse this 
invitation and who harden their 
hearts and live in sin, will find their 
portion in hell, with devils, and 
with murderers, thieves, liars, 
drunkards, slanderers, and all man- 
ner of wicked people. Love, mercy, 
and hope will be shut out, and 
never-ending woe will prevail there. 

I am sure that as the time for 
leaving this world comes to each 
one of us— as it surely will— we 
shall all wish for a home in heaven; 
and God wishes to have us all in 
heaven. It is not his will that one 
soul be lost. The way is open for 
all, and we are all invited to get 
ready, if we are not yet prepared. 
Rut who can show us the way to 


heaven? Next month I shall try 
to tell you where and how you can 
find the way. Your friend, 

J. K. Hartzler. 

AfcVeytomi, Fa. 


FOOD FORJHE LAMBS. 

Seek good, and not evil, 
that ye may live : and so the 
Lord, the God of hosts, shall 
be with you, as ye have spo- 
ken, Amos 5 : 14. 

Lo, I am with you always, 
even unto the end of the world. 


The following Table will show those who 
wish to read the Testament in the way pro- 
posed what chapter to read each day. 


Day*. 

Chapter. | 

Day*. 

Chapter. 

June 

17 

J antes 

4 

July 

3 

3 John 

1 

44 

18 

44 

5 

44 

4 

Jude 

1 

44 

19 

1 Pet. 

1 

44 

5 

Rev. 

1 

a 

20 

44 

9 

Zm 

44 

6 

44 

2 

u 

21 

44 

3 

44 

7 

44 

3 

u 

22 

44 

4 

44 

8 

44 

4 

u 

23 

44 

5 

44 

9 

t4 

5 

u 

24 

2 Pet. 

l 

44 

10 

44 

6 

u 

25 

44 

2 

44 

11 

44 

7 

a 

26 

• 4 

3 

4 4 

12 

44 

8 

a 

27 

1 John 

1 

44 

13 

44 

9 

u 

28 

44 

2 

44 

14 

44 

10 

44 

29 

it 

3 

44 

15 

44 

11 

44 

30 

44 

4 

44 

16 

44 

12 

July 

1 

44 

5 

44 

17 

44 

13 

14 

it 

2 

2 John 

1 

44 

1 

18 

44 


died in l8G8. They had no children, never- 
theless he adopted, one after the other no 
less than six children, three boys and three 
girls, and invariably dealt with them on at- 
taining their majority as though they had 
been his own. Of the church of his choice 
he was a consistent member and liberal sup- 
porter. lie gave the site of the church 
near Fisher’s Mills and defrayed most of 
the cost of its erection, while at the opposite 
end of his farm he furnished the site of the 
public school. To the wandering poor, his 
house was ever open, and his pocket an un- 
failing bank and even in his last will and 
testament, charity is not forgotten, for a 
clause therein bequeaths to the Mennonife 
Church in trust the sum of $1000, the in- 
terest of wihch is to be devoted to church 
purposes and the relief of the poor of the 
township of Waterloo. During the last four 
or five years he was extremely teeble, and 
he may be said to have ditd of old age rather 
than of any special form of disease. The 
funeral was attended by an immense con- 
course of old friends and accquaintances 
from all parts of the country. The services 
were conducted by Enoch Detwiler in Ger- 
man, and in English by J. McNally. — Set. 


fltarrifb. 


On the 25th of April, Motes Stahly to Mary 
Wisely, both of Elkhart county, Ind. 


i f b 


This table can be written on a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 

Obituary. 

Died at his residence, in Waterloo Town- 
ship, Waterloo county, Ont., on the 7th of 
May, Henry Wanner, aged 84 years, 2 
months, aud 10 dayB. 

The deceased was one of the earliest 
settlers in the county of Waterloo, and as 
one of the last links that bind us to a gen- 
eration fast passing away, deserves more 
than the customary brief obituary. He 
was born on the 27th of February 1788, in 
Cumberland Co., Pennsylvania, and with 
his father emigrated to Canada in 1806, 
and settled on the farm near Fisher’s Mills, 
which he occupied for upwards of half a 
century. During the war of 1 Si 2 , he was 
compelled to join the Canadian Militia, who 
were despatched to defend the Niagara front- 
ier, but in accordance with the peace prin- 
ciples of the Mennonite church of which he 
was a member, ho steadily refused to fire a 
shot, and was soon excused from the service, 
lie was twice married, and his first wife 
dying young, ho married her sister who 


On the 21 et of March, in Miami co., Ind., of 
erysipelas, Christiana , wife of Wm. llochstetler , 
aged 59 yrs., 9 mos., and 1 day. She leaves a 
bereaved husband and 7 children to mourn their 
Iobs. Buried in Jos. Sohrock’s burying ground. 
Funeral service by A Wolfe. 

On the 27th of March, in Mifflin co., Pa., after 
a lingering illness of about two years, Sarah 
Emma , daughter of Jacob and Lydia Hartzler , 
aged 9 yrs., 8 mos., and 15 days. Her remains 
were interred on the 29th, in the presence of a 
large number of relatives and friends. Sermon 
by Samuel Yoder from Acts 17 : 30, 31. Her 
life had a large share of weakness and suffering ; 
but now she dwells in everlasting light, and joys 
that never fade. 

On the 12th of April, in Elkhart, co., Ind., of 
scarlet fever, Emily Eliza Link, aged 9 yrs., and 
9 days ; and on the 8 th of May, of consumption, 
Anna Mary, wife of Levi Chupp, aged 20 yrs., 7 
mos., and 25 days, both daughters of Jacob and 
Elisabeth Link. Funeral services were held May 
10th, by Jacob Beidler and Daniel Brenneman, 
from Mark 13 ; 23, and Gen. 43 : 14. 

Ye mourning saints, whose streaming tears, 
Flow o’er your children dead ; 

Say not in transports of despair, 

That all your hopes are fled. 

Dear husband, do not grieve nor weep, 

Dear Mary ’s now at rest. ; 

‘ Most calm and peaceful is her sleep, 

Ah ! she is truly blest. 

On the 22nd of March, in Elkharl co., Ind., o! 
scarlet fever, Amanda Arclista, daughter of 
Asher and Marelda Lockwood, aged 4 yrs., 2 mos., 
and 6 days. Funeral services were held May 


95 


1872 


HERALD' OF TBTJTH.' 


12th, by Jacob Beidler and Daniel Brenneman, 
from 2 Kings 4 : 2(3. 

“Is it well with the child ?” who can tell T 
And is she now freed from her pain ? 

Ah yes! with the child “it is well,” 

In heav’n you may meet her again. 

With Arclista, dear child, “ it is well,” 

And to her a bright crown shall be giv’n ; 

Ah yes! with all children ’tie well, 

“ For of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 

On the 14th of May, in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
Dropsy, Mary Ann Houenstein, aged 20 yrs., 3 
mos., and 3 days. Funeral services by Daniel 
Brenneman, from Job 17 : 11. Father, mother, 
brothers and sisters followed the dear and loved 
one to the grave in tears of affectionate love. 
May God comfort their hearts and give them 
grace and wisdom so to live that they may cher- 
ish in their hearts an abiding hope of everlasting 
life in which “ God shall wipe away all tears 
from their eyes. 

On the 3rd of April, in Mifflin co.,Pa., Barbara 
Hershberger, aged 68 yrs., 4 mos., aud 7 days. 
Her remains were interred on the 5th in the 
Juniata River cemetry, on which occasion a dis- 
course was delivered by John Yoder, from 
John 5 : 24. She was a member of the Amish 
Mennonite Church. 

“Farewell my earthly friends below, 

Though all so kind and dear to me; 

My Jesus calls, and I must go, 

Prepare to follow me.” 

On the 13th of May, near McYeytown, Mifflin 
co.. Pa., Samuel Sleinrook, aged 62 yrs., 9 mos., 
and 15 days. His remains were interred on the 
15th, in the Juniata ltiver cemetry, on which oc- 
casion a discourse was delivered by John Yoder, 
from Jn. 6 : 24. Ho was a member of the Amish 
Mennonite church. 

Oh let us then prepare for death, 

Since he on us will call ! , 

When we must here our treasure leave, 

Be ready for him, all. 

On the 15th of April, in Lancaster co., pa., after 
three days Bickness of Scarlet fever, Sarah Amelia, 
daughter of Samuel R. and Martha Hess, aged 
yrs., and 2 mos. Her remains were followed by 
a concourse of sympathizing relatives and friends 
to the Hammer Creek burying-ground. Services 
by Chr. Bomberger and John Risser, from 
1 Chr on'. 29 : 15. 

Dearest sister, thou art gone 
To join our brother above ; 

Where we all shall meet as one, 

If we Bubmit our souls to love. 

How we loved you none can tell, 

Save they who felt the blow ; 

Our consolation is, you dwell 
Far happier than below. 

On the 17th of April, in Lancaster co., Pa., of 
Palsy, Daniel Hostetler , of Strasburg township, 
aged 64 yrs. and 4 days. He w r as confined to his 
bed almost 9 years. He bore his sickness with 
patience, and felt to say with Job of old, “ I know 
i hat my Redeemer liveth.” Funeral discourses 
V>y Henry Shenk, Benjamin and Amos Herr. 
Peace to his ashes. 

On the 28th of April, in Medina co., Ohio, of 
the infirmities of old age, Henry Geisingcr, aged 
86 yrs., 1 month and 23 days. He was a member 
of the Mennonite church for a long time. Fu- 
neral services by Henry Martin from Wayne 
eo., and Henry Davison, from 2 Tim. 4 : 6 — 8 . 
He was buried on the 30th. 

On the 3rd of April, in Tazewell co., 111., of 
dropsy of the heart, Joseph Sleeker, aged 02 yrs. 
Services at the house by Jacob Unziclter and A. 
Rupp, aud at the grave by Joseph Stuckey. 

On the 2nd of May, in Woodford co., 111., of 
the infirmities of old age, John Gerber, aged ,4 
yrs. Service.. .,y Joseph Stuckey. 

On the 9th of May, in Woodford co., Ill,, Mi 


c hael King , aged 66 yrs. Buried on the 11th in 
the presence of many relatives and friends. 
Services by Jacob Zehr, Christian Risser and 
Joseph Stuckey. 

On the 1st of May, in Ontario co., Ont., Cath- 
arine, wife of Abraham Burkholder, nged 35 yrs., 

5 mos., and 5 days. She attended her grand- 
mother’s funeral the day before. She took ill 
about 12 o’clock, and died about 8 A. M. She 
leaves a husband and 6 children to mourn their 
loss. She was a sister in the Mennonite church. 
Interred in Wideman’s grave-yard. Services in 
Gerjman by Joseph Barkey, and by John Steckley 
in English, from 2 Cor. 5 ; 1. 

On the 7th of April, in St. Joseph co., Mich., 
Nancy, wife of Jonathan Hartzler, aged 40 yrs., 

10 mos., and 1 day. She was a faithful member 
of the Amish Mennonite church. She leaves a 
husband and 8 children to mour-n her early de- 
parture, and her loss is much felt in the family 
and church. Services by John Yoder at the house, 
at the school-house by David Hartzler and Chris- 
tian Wcrey, from Ju. 5 : 24 ; Rev. 14 : 12, 13. 

Sister, thou wast mild and lovely, 

Gentle as the Summer breeze : 

Pleasant as the air of evening. 

As it floats ameng the trees. 

On the 28th of April, in Markham, Canada 
West, at the old homestead, where she has lived 
since 1805, Mary Wideman, at the advanced age 
of 90 yrs., 8 mos., and 28 days. She was for- 
merly from Pa.; her offspring numbers 8 children, 
47 grand-children, and 126 great-grand-children. | 
Her end was peace. 

On the 25th of April, in New Orleans, La., Tre. j 
Christopher Maurer, aged 59 yrs. and G mos. He, 
w’ns born in France, but was a resident of the 
City of New Orleans for the last 26 years. He 
leaves three deeply grieved daughters, and many j 
relatives to mourn his departure. Funeral servi- | 
ces by Jacob Uber, from Ps. 90 ; 12. May our i 
loss be his eternal gain. 

On the 12th of May, in DeKalb oo., Ind., Uriah, J 
son of James and Malinda Coyle , aged 18 yrs., 5 
mos., and 23 days. He was a very pious youth, j 
and beloved by all, and left a bright evidence | 
that he died happy. Ho was buried at Fairfield | 
Center burying-ground. Sermon by C. 1>. Beery J 
and Eli Stofer, from 1 Peter 1 : 24. 


On the 28th of April, in Johnson co., Iowa, of 
nerve fever, Veronica, daughter of Paul P., and 
Magdalena Hershberger, aged 6 yrs., 11 mos., and 
4 days Sermon by Abner Yoder, from Mark 
10 : 14, 16. 

On the 16th of May, near Doylestown, Bucks co., 
Pa., John H„ son of Charles and Rachel Springer, 
of Hilltown, aged 25 yrs., 1 month and 26 days. 
His funeral was held at the Doylstown Mennonite 
Meeting-house, Pro. Samuel Godehall speaking 
at the house, and Pre. Isaac Rickert at the Meet- 
ing-house; having for their text the 144th Psalm, 
the first part of the 3rd verse. The deceased was 
a worthy young man, esteemed and beloved by 
all who knew him, and came to his untimely end 
by an accident, while engaged in pulling down 
an old barn on Dr. Bigony’s place, in Warring- 
ton. In attempting to get out of the way of a 
heavy piece of timber, which fell suddenly, he 
stumbled and was struck on the head, fracturing 
his skull and causing almost instant death. 

We weep around thine early bier. 

And thy untimely end do mourn, 

Still wishing oft that you were here 
Kind acts of friendship to perform 


Weep not for me, my parents dear, 

Since I must go and leave you here ; 

With Jesus I shall happy be, 

O parents, do not weep for me. 

Dear sisters too, dry up your tears. 

And trust in God, the balm of fears'; 

And walk along the narrow road, 

And meet me in that blest abode. 

On the 28th of April, in Montgomery co.. Pa., 
of Apoplexy, Hannah, wife of Henry Minigwger , 
in her 59th year. The 1st of May her earthly 
remains were deposited in the bosom of the earth, 
id the presence of an unusually lurge number of 
people, in the Hatfield burying-ground. Funeral 

services by Laux, Jacob Kolb, and 

Nice, from Marh 13 : 33. She was a faithful 
wife, mother and sister in the Mennonite church. 

On the 1 lth of May, in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
Scarlet fever, David, son of Christian I. and Mary 
Yoder, aged 9 yrs., 7 mos., and 6 days. Funeral 
discourse by David If. llochstetler. 

On the 18th of May, in Montville, Medina co., 
Ohio, of Consumption, Elizabeth, wife of Henry 
Freed, aged 39 yrs., 2 mos., and 25 days. Servi- 
ces by E. Hunsberger, and H. Beery, from Jn. 

5 ; 24—30. 

On the 5fh of May, in Westmoreland co., Pa., 
Hannah, wife of D. Fratz, aged 62 yrs., 1 mo., and 

6 days. She leaves an aged husband to mourn 
his loss, but he need not mourn as those who 
have no hope. She was buried in the Mennonite 
grave yard, in the presence of a large number of 

relatives and friends. Sermon by — R»gg 

in German, and Jouas Blongh in English. 


letters tlcrcibcir. 

_g 4/ 

David Nold, John P King, Jacob Beiler, Amos 
Cressman, J K Hartzler, John H Landis, David 
Landis, Daniel Nafziger, John H Landis, Charles 
Hartuug. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

A — Christian B Allebach $1 60 ; John U Am- 
stutz 60cts ; John Albrecht $1 ; Henry Ayle 
$6 70. 

B — Jas Brooks $1 : J N Brubac.her $1 ; John 
Berkey $4 50 ; Jacob Bender $3 60 ; A Bixler 
1 Oct s ; David K Berkey $1 80 5 John B Bechtel 
S2 60 ; Jos Blosser $1 : E II Byler SI ; Christian 
Brenneman $1 ; Abm Bowman 20cts. 

C — Chr Claudon $1 ; Noah B Cockley 50cts. 

D — Joseph H Dobner $2 ; John Diller $1. 

E— Anna K Ebersole $1 50 ; John F Ebersole 
$1 ; Christian Esch $1. 

F-Wm G Freed $1 ; Maria L Forry $1 : Elias 
| M Fisher $1. 

I G—P Goldsmith $1 ‘ Jos Gingrich $1 ; Jos 
Gascho $1 ; Fred Geiger 35cts ; Joseph Gingery 
! lOcts ; Andrew Good $‘3. 

H — Joseph High .$1 ; Christian Ilertzler $1 60; 
Jerry Hahn $1 ; Wm Hine 50cts ; S S Hartzler 
$9 75 ; Jacob llochstetler $3 ; A llunsicker $3 ; 
T Haushaltcr $1 ; II Hartman .$1 60 ; Samuel R 
Hess $1 ; Jacob Homsher $3. 

K — D II King $6 30 ; Jacob C Kenagy 80cts ; 
Henry Kenagy Si : Nicholas King $1 ; Daniel 
Kilheffer $1; Levi Kratz $1; Jacob Kenagy $1 50; 
Carl F Ivuntze $2 50 ; Isaac B Ring $2. 

L— Joseph B Lichty $4 35 ; John Lapp $1 ; 
Mnrtin Lapp $1 ; P S Lehman $1. 

M — Toll n K Miller $1 ; Noah Mast Si ; Elias 
M Miller #3 ; Benjamin Mctzler Si ; C K Miller 
#2 75 ; John M Miller Si 20 ; J J Marner !}i7 ; 
Gideon I* Marner lOets ; Peter J Miller $1. 

N — V Newhauser $1 ; Edward Nittrower 80cts. 
P — Philip 11 l’arret $1 ; John Plank $1. 
p, — Jacob Rupp SI ; Jacob Itiehl 75cts ; Martin 
Restiler $1 ; I’h Ronlet 25cts. 

S — Chr Stahly OOets ; Mrs Geo Sbupc $1 ; 
Peter E Stuckey 70cts ; Chr Stahly $1 ; Chr 
Schlater 50 cents ; Henry Shaum $1 : Joseph 
Stuckey $4; Stephen Sohrock $3'; Elizabeth 
Schrock $1 ; D Stcinman $1 ; Christian Stucky 
Si 25 ; Henry. Shf nk St ; M W Shenk $1 50 ; 
Christian Schertz .SI, 

\V — John Witmcr S3 ; Christian Wyso $1 60 ; 
Samuel Widennin Si ; Christian Wiumor $4 ; 
Joseph Wagoner $ 1 60 ; Wm Wiler Si. 

V— Jonas C Yoder S3 40 ; Jos Yoder $1 ; S D 
Yoder $3 ; Lewis Yoder $1. 

Z— D J Zook $1 ; B Zook $3 ; J Zook $1 50. 


96 


HBE/ALD of truth. 


gun* 



Foe Books — Abm l> et ^« ilel [ r 

Hart $4 50; A N Downer $10; John Lnpp $5 10, 
^H.«bb.im OT *10 06 ; H 
Jacob Gehman $4 ; Samuel Blough $9 10 , P J 
Hershberger $10 80 ; Cbr Gortner *7 60 .David 
Basinger |l6 20 ; C -J Hochstetler *28 60 i iC 
Kenagy $0 50 ; Rev C Tecklenburg $6 85 , Peter 
Schantz $16 50 ; Jacob 8 Kratz $10 50.^ 


TIME TABLE. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passenger trains on find after Apr. 14th, 18i2, 
leave Elkhart as follows : 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Main Line,) 11,20, a. m. 

S % i : 

Grand Rapids, 1 

GOING WEST. 

Special Chicago Express J*J5j * “ 

Night Express, 

Pacific Express, ’ ' ' 

Accommodation ’’ ' ' 

Elkhart Accommodation, ‘ ; 

Grand Rapids train arrives from White rigeon 
at i 05 p. m., and returns at 2,30 p. m. 

Warsaw Wabash and Cincinnati train arrives 
via Goshen at 11,40 a. m., and departs via Goshen 

All trains run on Cleveland time which 
ie 20 minutes faster than Chicago time. 
a£S~ Sleeping cars on all night trains, 
jtjf Time and fare the same as by any otn- 

° r r ° Charles Paine, Gen. Supt. 

C. W. Greene, Agent, Elkhart. 

Books for sale at this office. 

The following books are sent by mail, postage 

^ f The ^English Mennonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the Eaglish Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left the press, and is now ready for delivery , 

at the following price : 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid bU 

Per dozen, “ “ , , 

.. “ sent by express at purchasers 

expense 6 

Pocket edition, - * ‘ 

The German Spelling Book, a work of 160 
nazes adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
ihosc’ who wish to study the German language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. - - - 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers ex- ^ 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 

0D We P have °yet a small number of the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for 75 cents. 

Anoenbhmk Stunden in Zion. The little Rook, | 
•• Angenehme Stunden in Zion." written by Ulrich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenberg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 

Per single copy, postage prepaid, - $0 

“ dozen, , 

•• hundred, by express, at puixliaBers 

expense, - - - " " * 1 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
langnage, worthy of being road by all 


German Catechism or Question Boot We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 

which was originally pubUshed by the Mennonite 

church in Germany, and republished m 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our offioe, 

at the fallowing prices : 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ 0 K 

Per dozen, _ 

“ hundred, by express, - * w 

Repentance Explained, is the title of * little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. W alker, D D., 
and published by the American Tract Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people! and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Price, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of Pride and Humility, Eng. 
and Ger. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 
Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen <5 cts. 


English Mennonite Hymn Book, 
Conversation on Saving Faith, \ 
(Confession of Faith,) English j 
' 4i “ German 

English-German Testaments 
German Bibles, small size 
English Bibles “ “ # 

German Testaments, small size 


$ .60 

.76 

.60 
.65 
1.00 
1.00 
.20 

large size, with clasps 1.60 
44 “ with notes 2.00 

English Testaments, small size .15 to .50 

6 44 4 4 large size -40 to .60 

Dymond on War "99 

Should Christians Fight? 

Peace Manual . , ... 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2.^.0 

44 •• “ German, l.bo 

American Tract Primer, Eng. or Ger. .40 

German and English Primer • 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. jo 

Bible Text Book 
Bible Reader’s Help 

Ahn’s German Grammar i fO 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklmrung J.bO 

OehlschlagerB Eng & Ger Dictionary, 1 <0 

Adlers “ “ “ 2 80 

Adlers large “ “ “ by express 7 00 

Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 1 1? 

Websters Dictionaries, < 5, 90, 1 „0, 1 45 a _ 50 
Habermans German Prayer Book 30 

“ English “ “ SO 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 3 00 

u 4 4 »4 German 4 00 

Enelish Testaments with notes 1 10 

.. “ Psalms 1 40 

German “ “ “ l 19 

Dictionary ot the Bible, by express 5 00 

ii 44 44 Illustrated 1 8 o 

Pilgrims Progress, English or German 75 

History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 65 

IIuebner 8 Bible History, English 1 -0 

Fleetwoods Life of Christ 3 k> 

Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 1 &0 

Menno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 2._o 

Unparteiisches Qcsangbuch, with clasps 1.60 

G emeinschaftliche Lieder-Sammlung 

(mennonitisches Licderbuch) -60 

Unparteiische Lieder-Sammiang 

(amisches Liederbuch) -50 

Spiegel der Taufe (Ger.) - 40 


66 


Ernsthafte Christenpflicht 
Johann Arnd’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arnd’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradies Gsertlein, &c. 3.60 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 26 

Bibles, 1 00, 2 00, 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 

per volume by express 4.00 

Health, or how to live 1-26 

Brown’s Pocket Concordance 
Mind and Words of Jesus 60 

Morning and Night Watches 60 

The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or German, by express 3.75 

For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each year bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.66 
The three years together in one volume, 
by express $3.50, by mail $4.00. 


MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 

Funk’s Bons. 

Price per single copy, Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

44 ,«4 44 «‘ prepaid 14.50 

THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush and Kieffer. 

Price per Bingle copy, postage prepaid, $ 0 .bU 
44 44 doz. 6 -5° 

THE CHRISTIAN HARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 36 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Music. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $ 1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnson’s Bystem tor 
learning to read music is unsurpassedby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $1- 
Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, we will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices- 

i’jcralb of (frntb. 

A Religious Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $1,00 a year in 
either language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Fersons subscribing should be particular 
state whether they wisti the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies sent free. 
Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

Elltliart Ind. 


Mennonite Book Store, Book and Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 



A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY JOURNAL. 


Vol. 9 -No. 7. 


“How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.” 

ELKHART, INDIANA, JULY 1812. 


Whole No. 103. 


Walking with God. 

How happy he who walks with God, 

While wand’ring through this vale of tears ! 
IIow brightly gleams the narrow road ! 

What precious words the pilgrim hears! 

God speaks to him in promise sweet ; 

He talks with God along the way, 

As friends in earnest council meet, 

While peace divinely gilds the way. 

In trial’s hour, iu sorrow’s night, 

He feels a heavenly presence near, 

A Bmile whose lustre brings delight, 

A hand that wipes each rising tear. 

The pilgrim feeds on angel’s fare ; 

He drinks where living waters flow ; 

When weak, is strong; ’mid pain and care 
He feels his heaven begun below. 

Death Is translation; death is life. 

Faith sees the new-fledged spirit rise 
Far, far above earth’s sin and strife, 

To meet her God above the skies. 

M. A. W. C. 


The Unanswerable Question or the 
Great Salvation. 


by j. m. brenneman. 


“How shall we escape if we neglect 
so great salvation,” lleb. 2 : 3. 

i ( Continued.') 

Briefly, he gives to all truly believing and 
penitent persons, the power to become the 
children of God. and heirs of eternal life in 
the world to come, where there is fulness 
of joy and pleasure forevermore; where no 
sorrow, sickness, plagues, pain nor suffering 
shall ever be, but “a far more exceeding 
and eternal weight of glory/* where they 
may rest from their labors, and their works 
do follow them ; where they shall shine forth 
as the sun in the kingdom ol their bather; 
where they shall be like unto the angels, 
yea, like unto the Lord himself, for we shall 
see him as he is (1 Jn. 3 : 2). _ They shall 
be with him always, and shall sit down with 
Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the king- 
dom of heaven, where they shall see all the 
prophets and the apostles, with all the saints 
and pious children of God. \\ here, clothed 
with white raiment, and with palms in their 
hands, they shall triumph forever, and sing 
praises, thanksgiving and honor unto God 
and the Lamb. Well may the prophet have 
said, “Say yo to the righteous that it shall I 


be well with him, for they shall eat ot the 
fruit of their doings,” Is. 3 : 10. Paul also 
writes, “ I reckon that the sufferings of this 
present time arc not worthy to be compared 
with the glory which shall be revealed in 


us. 


I think that all these things taken together 
may very properly be called a great salva- 
tion : That such poor, deeply-fallen, wicked, 
impure sinners, and enemies of God should 
bo raised up to such a blessed, holy and ex- 
ceedingly glorious and happy condition, 
which shall endure forever in heaven. But 
as already said, this salvation is too great for 
us to describe. There is indeed nothing that 
is above it or better than it. It (rod had 
said wc should ask what we desired that he 
should give us, we could have asked for 
nothing better than this eternal salvation 
which is offered to us yet, through grace, 
and oh, how shall we escape if we neglect it t 

O ye people, let us properly consider that 
it depends upon us beyond a doubt, whether 
we will obtain this great and eternal salva- 
tion or not ! For though we must be saved 
by grace, and not by good works, yet we 
may, notwithstanding, neglect the grace of 
God, lleb. 12 : 15, and receive the same in 
vain’ 2 Cor. 6:1, and also fall from grace, 
Gal. 5 : 4. 

If we are not eternally saved, it is our own 
fault, for God hath done his part “As I 
live, saith the Lord God, I have no pleas- 
ure in the death of the wicked, but that the 
wicked turn from his way and live. Turn 
ye turn ye from your evil ways ; for why 
will ye die Ezek. 33 : 11. God will have 
all men to be saved, and to come unto the 
knowledge ot the truth, 1 Tim. 2 '• 4. He 
is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that 
any should perish, but that all should come 
to repentance and live, 2 Pet. 3 : 6- He 
couimandoth all men everywhere to repent; 
that is, that they feel sorry for their sins, 
cease from them, lead a better life, yea, that 
they cease to do evil and learn to do well. 

The first sermon that Jesus preached was, 
“Repent ye and believe the gospel” for he 
came to call sinners to repentance. 1 Ic taught 
that men must be changed, and become as 
little children ; that they must be born again 
of the Spirit of God from above, else they 
can not enter into his kingdom, or be saved. 
Paul taught the same (Gal. 6: 15), “ For in 
Christ Jesus (says he) neither circumcision 


nor uncircumcision availeth anything, but 
a new creature.” 

As a matter of course we cannot regener- 
ate ourselves, but we can pray to God for a 
pure heart and a right spirit, and if we ask 
in faith we shall receive. Although Jesus 
died for all men, and made an atonement for 
the sins of the whole world, he does not 
compel any one to accept this salvation ; no, 
but through grace lie offers it, and asks, and 
invites us to accept it. But we ourselves 
also must work out our salvation with fear 
and trembling. We must avail ourselves of 
the appointed means and make use of them. 
We must put onr hands to the plow, follow 
Jesus and do all things whatsoever he has 
commanded us, and labor to enter into that 
rest, giving diligence to make our calling 
and election sure, for we cannot give heed 
to salvation if we neglect the means there- 
unto appointed. 

The chief means which God has given us 
to make use of, are the following. First, ho 
has given us the Holy Scriptures, as a means 
and guide unto salvation, which we should 
daily read and search. It shows us how ut- 
terly lost and unsound we are by nature, 
and points us to Jesus the Physician of souls. 
It points us to salvation through faith in 
Christ Jesus. We should especially read 
the gospel, for it is the power of God unto 
salvation to every one that believeth, and is 
called the word of reconciliation, the glad 
tidings, the gospel of.salvation, the gospel 
of peace, a shining light, &c. 

In the second place, God has appointed 
the preaching of the word, which also is an 
excellent means, and is called “the ministry 
of reconciliation,” 2 Cor. 5 : 3. This we 
should diligently attend, for “faith cometh 
by hearing,” and through the foolishness ot 
preaching 0 it pleased God to save them that 
believe, 1 Cor. 1 : 21, The commjuid to the 
apostles was, to “preach the gospel to every 
creature; he that believeth and is baptized 
shall be saved.” They are called the “serv- 
ants of the most high God, which show unto 
us the way of salvation.” The angel com- 
manded Cornelius that he should call Simon 
whoso surname was Peter, who should tell 
him words whereby he and all his house 
should be saved. To the Jews Paul said 
in a certain discourse, “To you is the word 
of this salvation sent/ Acts 13 : 26. Again 
he says, “Now then, wo are embassadors tor 
Christ, as though God did beseech you by 


98 


-pr-m-FP. A ±JD OP TBUTH. 





who have been awakened. He 
upon me in the day of trouble 


us ; we pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye rec- 
onciled to God,” 2 Cor. 5 : 20. Again, 

“ How beautiful are the feet of them that 
preach the gospel of peace,” Horn. 10 : 15. 

In the third place, prayer is a means of 
inestimable value appointed of God, for those 

” says, “Call 
and I will 

deliver thee.” A soul that is truly awakened 
from the sleep of sin will often feel itself in 
great trouble, like the poor publican who stood 
afar off and smote upon his breast and said, 

“ God be merciful to me a sinner.” Those 
who with a contrite and broken heart thus 
pray to God, have the promise that he will 
hear them, even as Cornelius, who prayed 
always to God, and whose prayers came up 
for a memorial before him. He was told to 
send and call Peter, who would declare unto 
him the words of salvation. “For whosoever 
shall call upon the name of the Lord (in 
faith) shall be saved.” Hence we ought to 
pray, “Lord increase our faith.” “The Lord 
is nigh unto them that call upon him in 
truth.” 

When Paul was troubled about the salva- 
tion of his soul, Ananias was sent to him by 
the Lord, for it was said, “ Behold he pray- 
eth.” He then again received his sight and 
was filled with the Holy Ghost. No doubi 
Paul knew by experience that prayer was a 
means well adapted to obtain the favor of 
God, and hence he exhorts to “ pray without 
ceasing.” 

We must however pray in faith and not 
doubt. “ What things soever ye desire, 
when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, 
and ye shall have them.” I believe he that 
will avail himself of the three above men- 
tioned means in faith, diligently, and with 
an upright heart, will not fail in attaining 
this blessed salvation. God does not pass by, 
any one without convincing him by his 
Spirit and reproving him of sin. Jesus 
stands at the door of our hearts and ofttimes 
knocks earnestly for admission, that he may 
sap with us, and we with him. When 
Zaccheus received him with joy, Jesus said 
to him, “ To-day is salvation come to this house.” 
To-day if we hear his voice we are not to 
harden our hearts, as in the day of provoca- 
tion. lie desires to enter into the temple of 
our hearts. God also calls and invites us in 
various ways. By sickness, by death and 
by many reproofs and chastisements, which 
he sends in love to remind us of our duty, 
and bring us to a knowledge of salvation 
(Luke 1 : 77), and to convince us that we 
need a Savior. 

This salvation also is free unto all men who 
will accept it, for it is said, “ Look unto me, 
and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth 
(Is. 45 : 22), for the grace of God that 
bringeth salvation, hath appeared to all 
men,” Tit. 2 : ll. God is no respecter of 
persons, but in every nation, he that feareth 
him and worketh righteousness is accepted 
with him. Among all nations and tongues, rich 
and poor, educated and uneducated, noble and 
ignoble, who or wherever they may be, all 
are called, and may come and be saved. 


“Ho! every one that thirsteth, come ye to 
the waters, and he that hath no money, come 
ye buy and eat; yea, come buy wine and 
milk, without money and without price. 
Wherefore do ye spend money for that which 
is not bread ? and your labor for that which 
satisfieth not? hearken diligently unto, me 
and eat ye that which is good, and let your 
soul delight itself in fatness.” “And the 
Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let 
him that heareth say, Come. And let him 
that is athirst come. And whosoever will, 
let him take of the water of life freely.” 
AH who believe in Jesus, are obedient unto 
him, and remain faithful unto the end, shall 
without any doubt obtain eternal salvation. 
But who has believed our report? And 
where arc any to be found who value eternal 
salvation above all things as they should ? 
Not only do most people not regard or value 
it, but they yet despise it. Even as the 
guests who were invited to the wedding, ol 
whom it is said, “But they made light of it, 
and went their ways, one to his farm, anoth- 
er to his merchandise.” For the sake of 


temporal gain many will neglect the eternal 
riches, the eternal salvation. By this par- 
able of the marriage feast, and the invita- 
tion to it, is plainly represented to us how 
GodTias prepared everything that is neces- 
sary to our eternal happiness and salvation, 
and how all men are invited thereto, for it is 
said, “As many as ye shall find, bid to the 
marriage.” Oh ! how sad it is that so many 
reject such gracious invitations and despise 
the riches of his goodness ! 

If, for example, we should be in great 
want of food, and knew no way to save our- 
selves, and had nothing to expect but short- 
ly to die from starvation, and there was a 
very rich king in a neighboring state who 
had everything in abundance, and out of 
sympathy, should send his servants to us, 
with the offer that if we would come unto 
him and become eitizens of his dominion, 
and be subject unto him, he would care for 
and give us food and all that we should 


us „ 

need as long as we should live; and also 
that he would bestow upon us good and 
beautiful dwellings, with all necessary fix- 
tures and conveniences that could be desired; 
and that he would also Bend for us even as 
Joseph sent for his father Jacob and his kin- 
dred, and brought them to Egypt during 
the famine. Would we not very highly 
prize such an offer? no doubt we would. 
And would we not sincerely love and thank 
this king for his goodness, and with pleas- 
ure obey him, aDd be subject unto him ? Or 
could it yet be possible that we would be so 
ungrateful that we would despise such an 
offer? Would not every man say we were 
acting very foolishly thus to do ? But alas . 
how many thousands of people act still 
much more foolishly than this would be ; 
for the soul is much more noble than the 
body ; and the eternal salvation of the soul 
is of an indescribably greater value than the 
temporal happiness of our dying bodies ever 
can be; for nothing may be compared with 
the value of the eternal salvation of the soul 


in heaven, and how shall we escape if we 
neglect so great a matter ! 

The apostle makes the inquiry, “How 
shall we escape ?” He includes also himself, 
for he too was a “ Hebrew of the Hebrews,” 
Phil. 3 : 5. 

And now the important question is also 
addressed to us, which no man can answer, 
“How shall we escape?” How shall we go 
about the matter ? Whither shall we turn ? 
What shall we do to escape if we neglect so 
great salvation ? Here the most learned up- 
on earth must be silent and unable to answer 
the great question. None is able to show us 
a safe way to escape if we neglect this great 
salvation. 

Our text clearly implies that there is great 
danger before us, from which the careless 
| and unconcerned who disregard this prof- 
fered salvation cannot possibly escape ; for 
where there is no danger there is nothing 
to fear, or from which it is necessary to es- 
cape. And that there is really before us a 
great danger, a terrible punishment, from 
which all impenitent, unbelieving, and 
those who only make a show of religion, and 
only bear the name of being Christians, can- 
not escape, is very clear from several pass- 
ages which have already been quoted. “To 
whom sware he that they should not enter 
into his rest but to them that believed not?” 

“ Let us therefore fear, lest a promise being 
left us of entering into his rest, any of you 
should seem to come short of it.” “Let us 
labor therefore to enter into that rest, lest 
any man fall (mark) after the same example 
of unbelief,” even as the Jews, is the mean- 
ing of the apostle. That is, that on account 
of unbelief we will be debarred from this 
rest and salvation, for “he that believeth 
not shall be damned.” “ Oh, generation of 
vipers, who hath warned you to flee from 
the wrath to come?” said John the Baptist; 
for “ the wrath of God is revealed from 
heaven against all ungodlines and unright- 
eousnes of men,” Korn. 1 : 18. There shall 
be rendered “indignation and wrath, tribu- 
lation and anguish upon every soul of man 
that doeth evil,” Rom. 2 : 8, 9. Jesus said 
to the unbelieving Jews, which would give 
no heed to the salvation which he preached 
unto them, “Ye serpents, ye generation of 
vipers, how can you escape the damnation 
of hell?” Matt. 23 : 33. “For, behold, the 
day cometh that shall burn as an oven ; and 
all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, 
shall be stubble, and the day that cometh shall 
burn them up, saith the Lord of Hosts, 
Mai. 4: 1. “Behold, the Lord cometh with 
ten thousand of his saints, to execute judg- 
ment upon all, and to convince all that are 
ungodly among them of all their ungodly 
deeds which they have ungodly committed, 
and of all their hard speeches which ungod- 
ly sinners have spoken against them,” Jude 
14, 15. “The tares are the children of the 
wicked one.” The reapers arc the angels 
! which shall “cast them into a furnace of tire: 
I there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth .' 
Matt. 13 : 42. 


1872 


99 


HEBALD OP TRUTH. 


In the day of judgment Jesus shall say to 
those on his left hand, which neglected the 
great salvation, “Depart from me, ye curs- 
ed into everlasting fire prepared for the 
devil and his angels, * * * and these shall 
.ro away into everlasting punishment.” “The 
Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven 
with his mighty angels, in flaming fire taking 
vengeance on them that know not God, and 
that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, who shall be punished with everlast- 
ing destruction,” 2 Thes. 1 : 7, 8, 9. The* 
Lord knoweth how to reserve the unjust 
unto the day of judgment to be punished, 
2 Pet. 2 : 9. But “fear him which is aide 
to destroy both body and soul in hell,” Matt. 
10 : 28. The unbelieving shall have their 
portion in the lake which burnetii with fire 
and brimstone, Ilev. 21:8. “Every tree 
that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn 
down and cast into the lire,” Matt. 7 : 19. 
“ It is better for thee tc enter into the king- 
dom of God with one eye, than having two 
eyes to be cast into hell fire, where their 
worm dicth not and the fire is not quenched,” 
Mark 9 : 47, 48. “He that soweth to his 
flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption,” Gal. 
6 : 8. “ Woe unto the wicked ! * * * for 

the reward of his hands shall be given him.” 
( To he continued.) 

- — — m m s 

Translated from the M Gemeindeblaft.'’ 

Origin ofthc Mennonite Church, and 
the Life of Menno. 


Continued. 

The mighty movement of the reformation 
began in the sixteenth century, and by the 
great reformers, especially Luther, through 
his translation of the Bible, the light of the 
gospel was spread abroad; those who suffer- 
ed for Jesus, and **ere scattered in all lands, 
rejoiced; they hoped that the end of their 
suffering, and a universal victory for the old, 
apostolic Christianity which they retained, 
had arrived. But they soon found them- 
selves sadly deceived, and acknowledged 
that in the heads ofthc reformation, and in 
the now churches they had new enemies, 
who hated them even as their old enemies. 
INen Luther wrote to princes and senators, 
to prevail upon them, to banish out of their 
eities and country, t lie old anabaptists, who 
would not yield their apostolic rules and 
unite with the Lutheran church* or the 
church of state. In Switzerland, the perse- 
cution of the anabaptists, by the Culvanistic 
protestants, was the most inhuman, as may 
he seen by the following account from the 
Martyrs’ Mirror. 

In the year 1530, an official edict was is- 
sued by the government authorities of Zu- 
rich as follows : “ Wc, therefore, deteruiin- 
ately command all the citizens of this land, 
and all those who arc any in the least con- 
nected therewith, namely, the chief and un- 
der officers, town councils, judges, church 
deacous, and deaconesses, that it they meet 
with auy anabaptists, that they will report 
them to us according to their oath, and not 


to suffer them anywhere, nor let them in- 
crease, but to imprison them, and to deliver 
them to us; for we will, according to law, 
punish with death, all the anabaptists, and 
those who adhere to them ; and we will also 
punish those without mercy, who aid them, 
who will not report or disperse them, or do 
not surrender them to us to be imprisoned ; 
we will punish them all according to their ( 
demerits, as such as have violated the oath , 
which they swore to the magistracy.” An 
official notice of similar import appeared la- , 
ter, not only in Zurich and Berue, but also j 
in the towns of Holland, the contents of j 
which was, that the anabaptists must be con- 
verted to the predominant (Calvanistic) par- 
ty, whether they were willing or not ; that 
they must attend the Calvanistic churches ; 
abandon the baptism of believers; accept 
infant baptism, and in short they must agree 
with them iu faith and conduct. 

Imprisonment with water and bread, flog- 
ging, stocks, fine, and many other great, 
aud so-called light punishments, were in- 
flicted for the first offense, banishment for 
the second, and death for the third. Final- 
ly that “ We ordain that the exercise of all 
religion, except the Calvanistic, shall he for- 
bidden.” Tn accordance with that ordi- 
nance, in Switzerland, many anabaptists 
were beheaded, drowned, or burned. Thus 
the church minded protestants dealt in the 
time of the reformation. 

About this time also iu the southern part 
of Germany, many anabaptists were put to , 
death, on account of their faith. I will here 
present an example from the Martyrs’ Mir- 
ror. In the year 1529, by an edict of the 
emperor Charles the V., through the pals- 
grave, at Altzey, in the Palatinate, there 
were about three hundred and fifty persons 
beheaded, drowned, and in other ways put 
to death on account of their faith. Wher- 
ever anabaptists were known to be, they 
wore taken from their houses, and led to the | 
place of execution ; and those who refused to 
recant, were speedily put to death. But 
they had such a cheerfulness in death, that 
the others who were to be executed, during j 
the execution, of their brethren and sisters j 
-ang spiritual songs, until the lot fell upon 
them. They cut eff the fingers, and burn- 
ed crosses upon the foreheads of others 
whom they did not execute, and treated 
them with other indignities. Notwithstand- 
ing all this cruelty, these Christians remain- 
ed steadfast, and their numbers constantly 
increased, so that at last the burgravo him- 
self inquired : “ What shall I do ? The more 
I execute, the more they increase.” In the 
same year, at Bausclilet (probably Bausch- 
let at Pfortzheiin), a brother, named George 
Bauman, for the sake of the faith, and the 
word of God, was apprehended aud tortured 
on the rack, by the nobleman of this place, 
and with great cheerfulness he went to the 
place of execution, and was beheaded. Al- 
so in the year 1530, at Pfortzheiin, a broth- 
er, named George Steinmetz, for the testi- 
mony of J esus Chiist, was apprehended and 
beheaded. 


In the year 1535, an edict was issued by 
the emperor .Charles, against the anabap- 
tists, in which it is said, “ All those who 
shall be found contaminated by the accursed 
sect of anabaptists, of whatever condition 
or rank they may be, their ringleaders, ad- 
herents, and all who participate, shall for- 
feit their lives and possessions, and shall be 
severely punished by fire, and that without 
delay.” Further : “ But as regards the oth- 
ers who have been rebaptized, or who have 
harbored any of these anabaptists knowing- 
ly, or did not make known their evil inten- 
tions and doctrines, if they do not sincerely 
regret it, they shall be executed with the 
[ sword ; but the women shall be buried in a 
! pit.” It was made known to all subjects, 
that whoever knew of such people, he should 
report them, and one third ofthc property 
belonging to the party returned, was 
! promised to the informer. None were per- 
mitted to plead, or present petitions for 
them ; neither was grace to be granted 
them. In such an inhuman manner were 
the sufferers for Christ treated, by those 
called Christians, because they maintained 
the apostolic baptism. To them applied 
the words, Ileb. 11 : 25, 26, 36-38. Their 
enemies did all this in the manner prophe- 
sied by tho Lord in John 16 : 2. 

About this time also commenced the la- 
bors of the man after whom our church was 
! named, namely Menno Simon. He was 
born in Witmarsum, a village of Holland, 
in 1496. What is known of his early years, 
he has written in a little book eiffctled, “Re- 
nunciation of Popery,” in which he says, 

“ In the year 1524, being then in my twen- 
ty eighth year, I undertook the duties of a 
priest in my father’s village, called Ping- 
jum .” Some think that he studied ii? Hei- 
delberg, or Freiburg. He had already 
served two years as priest, without having 
even touched the Iloly Scriptures, for he 
feared if he should read them they would 
mislead him. Thus, except in reading 
mass, and other necessary exercises in wor- 
ship, in company with two others, one of 
whom was his pastor, who was well educa- 
ted, and a subordinate ecclesiastic, he spent 
all his time in playing, drinking and all 
manner of frivolous diversions. Both of 
them had partially read the Scriptures, on 
the contrary, to Menno, their contents were 
eutirely unknown., aud ho could scarcely 
speak of it without being mocked. “ Be- 
hold !” said lie, “ such a stupid preacher 
was 1 for nearly two years.” 

In the third year of his priesthood, he 
began to be in doubt about tho mass, aud 
as 'often as he handled the bread aud wine, 
in the mass, these thoughts were renewed 
in him, that it was impossible for them to 
be the flesh aud blood ofthc Lord. fior a 
; time he thought it was the suggestion of 
the devil, that he might lead him off from 
his faith; wherefore ho confessed it often 

sighed and prayed to God. In order to 

obtain knowledge, ho read the New lesta- 
ment the first time. He had not proceeded 
far therein before he discovered that they 



hieir^ilid or truth. 


lull) 


were deceived. Thus all doubts concerning 
the transformation of the bread and wine 
were soon removed ; he was encouraged by 
the words of Luther, That the commands of 
men, which he now recognized as the doc- 
trines, could not cause eternal death. In 
one of his works he says, “ Through the il- 


ing his own opinion, I became convinced filements. I wished only to live comforta- 
that we were deceived in relation to infant bly and without the cross of Christ, 
bantisni. Thus reflecting upon these things my soul 

Thus my reader, I obtained a knowledge was so grieved that 1 could no longer en- 
of baptisni and the Lord’s Supper, through dure it. I thought to myself— I, miserable 
the iUumination of the Holy Ghost, through man, what shall I do . If I continue in 
much reading of the Scriptures, and medita- this way, and^ live not agreeably to the 


niucn ruauiiiL; u i tuc • — •/ » ... ,*• i 1 

sSSSBtjs 

was soon considered by some, though unde 1 ' T , t i ’ t t wr ; tp the truth ability the hypocrisy, the impenitent, carnal 

scrvedly, as being an evangelical preacher. por e | 0 11 • • * P , . though gopie pf e the perverted baptism, the Lord’s Sup- 

was a fine man. ’ the truth, neither use all my powers to di- 

. Previous to this, Merino knew but little Meanwhile it happened, when I had re- rect the wandering flock, who would gladly 
of the anabaptists According to the a P L ar that quite a num- do their duty if they knew it, to the true 

Martyrs' Mirror, in the ^ 1533 he rc ; but 1 whence the pastures of Christ-Oh how shall their 

ceived the remarkable intelligence that in b j® 1 or where they resided, shed blood, though shed in error, rise 

his vicinity, in the town of Leeuwarden a ^c e «nei no ' , ^ . g ^ hour qgainst me at the judgment of the Al- 

Eg UDkuowh to me, neither have I ever seen 

Sicke Snyder, and was a Swiss. What nn- the “ ftcrward( . the gcct of Munster made in- My heart trembled in my body. I pray- 

pression this made upon him, can best be A ■ , pious hearts incur ed to God with sighs and tears, that he 

learned from his own words, ^ ^ int / er ? or . My soul wa8 would give to me, a troubled sinner, the 

very strange to me to hear a second b p 1 , ' ' h \ ed for I perceived, that though gift of his grace, and create a clean heart 
tism spoken of. I examined the Scriptures much troubled, lor l perceivea, ^ ^ ^ merit£J of the 

crimson blood of Christ, he would graciously 


pious and trtTproacliable mao was executed or who they properly wore, is to this hour 
CTc“rXptizcd. This man was named unknowh to me, neither have I ever seen 

Sicke Snyder, and was a Swiss. What im- th «”' a the s of Munstcr lnado 
nression this made upon him, can best be Aiw-r»««o . , . 

learned from his own words, «• It sounded roads, by whom many pious hearts in our 
very strange to me to hear a seeoud hap- quarter, wore led into error. My soul was 
S spoken of. I examined the Scripture much troubled, for I perceived, that though 
assiduously and meditated on them earnest- they were zealous they erred in doctrine, 
r tZZlu find nothing in thou, concern- I exerted my feeble efforts as far as I was 
iuit infant baptism. After I had discovered able, in opposing them by preaching an 
S i convened with my pastor on the sub- exhortations. 1 conferred twice with one 
icct'j and after much discussion, he had to of their leaders, once m private, and again 
admit that there was no scriptural founds- m public; bur my admonitions availed noli ■ 
tion for infant baptism. Notwithstanding ing, because I did that myself which I we 
all this, i dared not trust my own under- knew was not right. , , 

standing* but consulted several ancient an- The report spread far abroad that I could 
thors. They taught me that children were readily silence these persons. All lookedto 
to be washed by baptism from their original me. 1 saw that I was the leader and defend- 
sin. I compared this doctrine with the er of the impenitent, who all depended up- 
Scriptures, and found that it made baptism on me. This Pitied my heart , I sig e 
take the place of the blood of Christ* and prayed, Lord help me, lest I make my- 


“ Afterwards desiring to know the grounds self partaker of other men's simt My soul 
r infant baptism, ] went and consulted 1-? 


for infant baptism, I went and consulted 
Luther. IIo taught me that children were | 
to be baptized on account of their own faith. 

L perceived that this also was not in accord- 
ance with the word of God. 

Next I consulted Bucer. lie taught 
that infants were to be baptized, that their 
baptism would cause those who bad their 
trainiug, to bo more careful in bringing 
them up in the way of the Lord. I per- 
ceived that this doctrine, too, was without 
foundation. 

I then consulted Bullinger. lie direct- 
ed me to the covenant and circumcision. 
This I found incapable of being substan- 
tiated by Scripture. 

Having thus observed that authors va- 
ried greatly among themselves, each follow- 


able, in opposing them by preaching and forgive my unclean walk and unprofitable 
exhortations. 1 conferred twice with one life, and bestow upon me wisdom, Spirit, 
of their leaders, once in private, and again candor and fortitude, that I might preach 
in public ; hm my admonitions availed noth- his exalted and adorable name and holy 
ing, because I did that myself which I well word unperverted, and make manifest bis 
knew was not right. truth to his praise. 

The report spread far abroad, that I could I began in the name of the Lord to 
readily silence these persons. All lookedto preach publicly, from the pulpit, thcwoid 
me. 1 saw that I was the leader and defend- of true repentance ; to direct the people into 
cr of the impenitent, who all depended up- the narrow path, and through the power ot 
on me. This pained my heart; I sighed the Scripture to reprove all sin and ungodli- 
and prayed, Lord help me, lest I make my- ness, all idolatry and false worship, and 
self partaker of other men’s sins. My soul to present the true worship also bap- 
was troubled and I reflected upon the result tism and the Lord’s Supper, according 
of my doings, namely, that if I should gain to the doctrine of Christ, to the extent that 
the whole world, and live a thousand years, I had at that time received grace from 
and at last have to endure the wrath of God, God. 

what would I have gained ? 1 also faithfully warned every one in re- 

Afterwards, the poor, straying flock, who lation to the abominations of Munster, con- 
wandered as sheep without a shepherd, af- corning kings, polygamy, dominion, the sword, 
ter many severe edicts and slaughters, as- &c., uutil alter the expiration ot about nine 
semblcd near my place of residence, called months, when the gracious Lord granted 
Oude Klooster, and, alas ! through the un- me his fatherly Spirit, aid and power ; then 
godly doctrines of Munster, and in opposi- I voluntarily renounced all my worldly hon- 
tiou to the Spirit, the word, and the exam- or and reputation, my unchristian conduct, 
pic of Christ, drew the sword to del'eud masses, infant baptism, and my unprofitahlo 
themselves, which the Lord commanded life, and at once willingly submitted to dis- 
Peter to put up in the sheath. tress and poverty, and the cross of Christ. 

After this had transpired, the blood of In my weakness I feared God ; I sought 
the slain, although it was shed in error, out the pious, and though they were few in 
grieved me so sorely that I could not cn- number, I found some who were zealous 
dure it. I could find no rest in my soul. I and maintained the truth. I conversed 
reflected upon my carnal, sinful life, my hyp- with the erring, and through the aid and 
ocritical doctrine and idolatry, in which I power of God, with his word, reclaimed 


grace from 


*For the benefit of the readers who 
are but little, or not at all acquainted with the 
history of Monno Simon, 1 will here give his own 
words concerning liiH awakening, conversion, 
and calling to the ministry of the anabaptists, as 


...ovw.jr j rmdlincss. I saw that these zealous child- 

words concerning his awakening, conversion, . * * . .. - . . 

and calling to the ministry of the anabaptists, as ren willingly gave their lives and their es- 
narrated in his “ Itenunciation of the church of 1 tates, though they were in error, for their 
Rome in which the reader, as 1 believe, can doctrine and faith. And I was one of those 

L*-! 1 1 •-1 11! - i a I • 


continued daily under the appearance of some from the snares of damnation, and 
godliness. I saw that these zealous child- gained them to Christ, while the hardened 
ren willingly gave their lives and their es- and rebellious, I commended to the 


obtain a clear and intelligent representation of 
his life and character. For the sake of brevity 
a few paragraphs have been omitted,- £V. Qemcin- 
dcblatt. 


Lord. 

About one year thereafter, while I was 


who had discovered some of their abomina- secretly exercising myself in the word of 
tions, and yet I myself remained satisfied God by reading and writing, it happened 
with my unrestrained life and known de- that six, seven or eight persons came to me, 


1872 


101 


ttTZJsbJLTjT) OF TBTITH. 


who were of one heart and one soul with 
myself, iu their faith and life, and as far as 
man can judge, were unblamable, and ac- 
cording to the testimony of the Scriptures, 
separated from the world and subdued to 
the cross. They sincerely abhorred, not on- 
ly the sect of Munster, but the anathemas 
and abominations of all other worldly sects. 
For the sake of those pious souls who were 
of the same mind and spirit both with them 
and with me, they with much solicitude 
kindly requested me, to reflect on the great 
sufferings and necessity of the poor, op- 
pressed souls (for the hunger was very great 
and the faithful stewards were very few), 
and apply to advantage the talents which I 
had unmeritedly received from the Lord. 

When I heard this, my heart was greatly 
troubled. Trouble and fear were on every 
side ; for, on the one hand I was sensible of 
my limited talents, my great ignorance, my 
weak nature, the timidity of my flesh, the 
unbounded wickedness, perversity and tyr- 
anny of the world, the powerful sects, the 
subtlety of different minds, and the heavy 
cross that would oppress me, should I com- 1 
ply with their solicitations, and on the other 
hand, the miserable, starving condition and 
necessity of these god-fearing, pious chil- 
dren, tor I saw plainly that they erred as in- 
nocent sheep which have no shepherd. 

At last, after much prayer, I placed my- 
self and these circumstances before the Lord 
and his church, in order that we might 
pray earnestly to the Lord for a season ; 
should it accord with his acceptable and ho- 
ly will that I could or might labor to his 
praise, that he would give me such a mind 
and heart as would enable me to say with 
Paul, “ Woe is me, if I preach not the gos- 
pel,” and if not, that he might provide a 
way to prohibit the same, for Christ says, 

“ That if two of you shall agree on earth as 
touching anything that they' shall ask, it 
shall be done for them of my Father which 
is in heaven. For where two or three are 
gathered together in nty name, there am I 
in the midst of them,” Matt. IS : 19, 20. 

Thus, my reader, behold, I was not called 
to serve among the followers of Munster, 
nor of any other seditious sect (as it is false- 
ly reported concerning me), but I have 
been called, unworthily, to this office by a 
people who were ready' to receive Christ and 
his word, led a penitent life in the fear of 
God, served their neighbors in love, bore 
the cross, sought the welfare and salvation 
of all men, loved righteousness and truth, 
and abhorred wickedness and unrighteous- 
ness, which shows pointedly that they were 
not such perverted persons as they are slan- 
derously reported to have been. But they 
were true Christians, though unknown to 
the world. 

When the persons before mentioned, did 
not desist from their supplications, and my 
own conscience in some degree made me 
uneasy (although in weakness), because 1 
saw the great hunger and need, already re- 
ferred to, I surrendered myself, soul and 
body to the Lord, and committed myself to 


his grace, and commenced in due time, ac- 
cording to the contents of his holy word, to 
teach, and to baptize, to labor in the vine- 
yard of the Lord with my limited talents, to 
build up his holy' city and temple, and to 
repair the dilapidated walls. The great 
and mighty God has made known and re- 
vealed the word of true repentance, the 
word of his grace and power, together with 
the salutary use of liis holy saeranients, 
through our humble service, doctrine and 
unlearned writings, together with the care- 
ful service, labor and help of our taithful 
brethren, in many towns and countries, to 
such an extent, and made the condition of 
his churches so glorious and bestowed up- 
on them such a subduing pow'er that many 
exalted and proud hearts not only became 
humble; the unclean, pure; the drunken, 
sober; the avaricious, benevolent ; the laro- 
cious, mild, and the ungodly, pions; but 
they also faithfully yielded their possessions 
and blood, bodies and lives, for the blessed 
testimony they had, as may yet daily be 
seen. These are not the fruits and eviden- 
ces of false doctrines, in which God is not a 
co-worker. Neither could they endure so 
long under such grievous misery and op- 
pressive crosses, were it not for the power and 
word of the Almighty which sustains them. 

Behold this is our calling, our doctrine 
and fruits of our labor ; on account ot which 
wc arc so grievously slandered, and so ma- 
levolently persecuted ; whether or not all the 
prophets, apostles, and faithful servants ol 
God, have endured similar sufferings on 
account of their faithfulness, we willingly 
leave all the pious to judge. 

I hope through the mercy and assistance 
of the Lord, that no one upon earth may 
have reason to accuse me of leading an av- 
aricious and luxurious life. Money and af- 
fluence I have not ; neither do I desire 
them, although alas, some from a perverted 
heart, say that I eat more roasted than they 
do seethed ; and drink more wine than they 
do beer. My Lord and Master, Jesus , 
Christ, was also called a wine-bibber and a , 
glutton. I trust that through the grace 
of the Lord, I am innocent in this matter, 
and stand acquitted before God. 

lie who purchased me with the blood of 
his love, and culled me, who am unworthy, 
to his service, knows me, and knows that I 
seek not wealth, nor possessions, nor luxury, 
nor ease, hut only tho praise ot the Lord, 
my salvation, and tho salvation ot many 
souls. For tliis I, my poor, feeble wile and 
children have for eighteen years endured 
* extreme anxiety, oppression, affliction, mis- 
ery and persecution, and at the peril of my 
life, have been compelled everywhere to live 
in fear and seclusion ; yea, when ministers 
repose on easy beds and downy pillows, we 
generally have to hide ourselves in secluded 
corners ; when they at weddings and feasts, 
pipe and beat the tambour, and vaunt loud- 
ly, we must look out when the dogs bark, 
lest the captors be at hand. Whilst they 
arc saluted as doctors, lords and teachers 
by every one, wc have to hear that we arc 


anabaptists, hedge preachers, deceivers and 
heretics, and must be saluted in the name 
of the devil. In short, whilst they are glo- 
riously rewarded for their services with large 
incomes and easy times, our recompense 
and portion must be fire, sword and death. 

Behold, my faithful readers, in such fear, 
poverty, misery and danger ot death, have 
I wretched man, performed to this hour, 
without change, the service of the Lord, 
and 1 hope through his grace to continue 
therein to liis glory, as long as I remain in 
this earthly tabernacle. What I and my 
faithful co-workers have sought or could 
have sought in performing these our ardu- 
ous and dangerous duties, is apparent to all 
the well-disposed, who may readily judge 
from the works and their fruits. 

I will here humbly entreat the reader for 
Jesus’ sake, to aecept in love, this my con- 
fession in relation to my illumination, con- 
version and calling, and to meditate there- 
on. I have made it out of urgent necessity, 
for the information of the pious reader, be- 
cause I was slandered by the clergy, and 
am accused, without foundation ot truth, 
of being called and ordained to this seriice 
by a seditious and heretical sect. He that 

feareth God let him read and judge. 

Men xo Simon. 

( To he continued.) 

Little Things. 


“A spark is a molecule of matter, yet it may 
kindle the world ; 

Vast is the mighty ocean, but drops have made 
it vast. 

Despise not thou a small thing, either for evil or 
for good, 

For a look may work thy ruin, or a word create 
thy wealth. 

The walking this way or that, the casual stop 
ping or hastening, 

Hath saved life and destroyed it, hath cast down 
and built up fortunes. 

Commit thy trifles unto God, for to him nothing 

is trivial, . 

And it is but the littleness of man that seeth no 

greatness in a trifle’’ 

This is not an exaggerated representation 
of little things. Every one can testify from 
liis experience to the far-reaching power ot 
what at least seemed to be comparatively 
insignificant objects and events. A random 
conversation in a rail-car, perhaps, or an ac- 
cidental interview with a friend in the place 
of business, or the turning of our foot into a 
-place of worship that was near, because it 
rained, instead of going to our usual place 
of worship at a greater distance, or the 
picking up of a hook to while away an idle 
hour, some little thing such as these has 

been the turning point in many men’s charac- 
ter* so that, humanly speaking, if that small 
event had not taken place, the whole alter 
1 conduct of life would have been changed. 

The same thing is true in the history ot 
nations. A spark of envy iu the bosom of 
Joseph’s brethren grew into settled enmity, 
and led them to aim at the destruction of 
his life; and hero commenced a series ot 
■ events which became so vast and extended 


OF TRUTH. 


iuft! 


as to give complexion to the affairs of two himself; great in knoavlcdge through study- 
nations through all subsequent periods. ing the least sentence and treasuring the 
The educational influence of little things least fragment; great in faith through not- 
is too much overlooked. The ambitious ing God’s hand in little incidents and go- 
friends of Napoleon Bonaparte taught him ing to him in little sorrows ; great in hoh- 
when a boy that he would one day be a great ness through avoiding little faults and being 
conqueror ; and to inspire him with the exact in little duties. 

same feelings, they formed mimic armies, The Christian lias Divine example tor 
and set him at the head of them, by which fidelity in regard to little things. In crea- 
he received a love of conquest and predom- tion and providence, as much care, wisdom, 
inance; and thus he who, with the same and attention, are expended on the least 
care and expense, might have been made a things as on the greatest. If we examine 
good man, was made by the plays of his the petals of a rose, we find it as exquisitely 
childhood the ambitious tyrant, and sent and as delicately tinted and touched by the 
like a scourge across the continent of Eu- pencil of God as the largest star that shines 
r 0 p (l and stands before his throne. Or if we take 

Voltaire, when five years old, committed the mightiest orb that the telescope brings 
to memory an infidel poem, and was never within our horizon, we find that it is not fin- 
able to undo its pernicious influence upon ished with greater care than the smallest 
his mind. He lived and died a corrupter molecule of matter that the microscope ro- 
of the world ; and thousands who have been veals to our view. In all God’s works, in- 
ruiued by him will bewail his memory to all deed, we see infinite detail, exquisite elabora- 
eternity. tion of the minutest and most microscopic 

The mother of Philip Doddridge taught j things, patient labor, process, attention, 
him to love God by sentences written on the Jesus also, during the days of his flesh, 
tiles which composed the hearth-stone ; and gave attention to little things as well as great 
he lived to be one of the worlds brightest or- ones. Wo are accustomed, when quoting 

- 1 n I . I 1 • 1 I 1 i. _ A. „ r.b hrtTtr r/nntwl 


Awake aud Repent. 

By I. C. Ryle. 


naments and greatest benefactors. Even 
the smallest influences give some shape and 
complexion to our principles. 

Little things make up character. The im- 
mensity of the Divine works is composed of 
parts. Our globe consists of elements, and 
even particles of matter comprise the whole. 


his character, and trying to show how grand 
it was, to point to him stretching out his 
hand, laying it upon the crested waves of the 
unruly ocean and making it lie down and be 
still, turning water iuto wine, opening the 
closed eye, and unstopping the dcat ear. 
But it is questionable whether these are the 

1 * 1. ..L _ A f nil ATTAnffl 


UVUIl piUUUlUO IllclblUI I/UV/ nnv*v. JJUl JO IjUCOWUUUUiU a*wv«*w* - 4 

The face of nature, when exhibiting its most highest proofs of his greatness. At all events, 
beautiful scenery, is infinitely diversified; we find that, while he displayed his mighty 
yet 9 pircs of grass, plants, and leaves of trees power in these great things he yet descend- 
are the component parts. The clouds which ed to what we should call very minute things, 
sometimes overspread the heavens are con- In beautiful hut truth-breathing tones, he 
stituted of mists or vapors of the air. Riv- exhorted Martha not to he over-anxious a- 
ers, rills, and even springs, may be considered bout the affairs of her household. lie used 

i n . p rt . i i 1 Cl i 


Urn, rlllrJj ttUU UVtJll uiaj uu vvuoiul-iou uuul anaiio vi uci uuuoouum. * 

us the fountains of the mighty deep. Storms [ more eloquent, earnest, and impressive rca 

- I* - .1 1. And iliA 11 1 rli ATirnru I in » ,1 i«nnni a Ann r\nAV WAnnn fl f iL, 


0 v A 

of snow and hail, and the falling showers, 
give demonstration to our senses that all things 
in nature are made up of little things. To 
this law man’s character is not an exception. 
A character for industry is acquired, not by 
some great and special exertions, but by the 
daily and persevering pursuit of some useful 
occupation. An amiable character is estab- 
lished not by any great exhibition of this 
spirit on a particular occasion, but by acts 
expressive of kindness to all in the little so- 
ciabilities and business transactions of life. 
Most people have neither ability nor oppor- 
tunity for great and noble enterprises; and 
hence, if they have a character at all, it is 
made up of small matters. 

Many a man’s piety is injured by over- 
looking or disregarding little things. Ho 
iails to take notice of’ them, and they accu- 
mulate into great, lie allows himself in lit- 
tle things, and thus forms a strong habit, ho 
relaxes in them and thus loosens the bonds 


soning in addressing one poor woman at the 
well of Samaria, than ho ever expended up- 
on kings, counselors, and liighpriests. After 
the miracle of the loaves and fishes, he 
closed that stupendous evidence of stupen- 
dous power by bidding his disciples gather 
up the crumbs that remained, in order that 
nothing might bo lost. When he rose tri- 
umphant from the grave, the great stone 
having been rolled away, and all the 
obstructions of the tomb having been rent 
asunder at his word, the napkin that had 
been wrapped around his head was found, 
not left behind in a state of confusion, but 
rolled up and laid aside by itself. What 
attention to little things ! What faithfulness 
“ in that which is least!’’ — Am. Messenger. 


Jesus went about doing Good. — He 
was not content with sending his disciples to 
do it, or doing it at a distance. No. lie 


I UlaAUO III UlULU UUU l/UUD A VSISOVUU V4 IWj Wi 1.10111^ t HV tv uh'mmivv* ’ 

which hold him to duty. So, on the other hand, would walk to the spot himself. He dc- 

maqy a man becomes eminent in piety by lighted to do good. Ho would sacrifice 
giving heed to little things, being grateful needful rest or food to do it. lie would go 
for the smallest good, watchful over the out of his road to do it. lie would speud a 
smallest error, fearful of the smallest sin, whole day in doing it. lie would do it 
careful of the smallest truth. He becomes for the worst. All of us might imitate him 
great through counting nothing little hut more in this. 


Reader, when I take the Bible in my 
hand, and look at the ways of the world, I 
?ee much that is very distressing, I see many 
persons, about whose souls 1 am exceedingly 
afraid. Listen to me for a few minutes, 
and I will soon tell you what I mean. 

I see many, who if Bible words mean 
anything, have not yet been converted and 
horn again. They are rot justified. They 
have not the spirit. They have no grace. 
Their sins are not forgiven. Their hearts 
are not changed. They arc not ready to 
die. They are not meet for heaven. They 
are neither godly nor righteous, nor saints. 

If they arc, Bible words mean nothing at all. 
Reader, are you one of these? If you are, 
awake and repent. 

I see many who to all appearance think 
no more about their souls than the Leasts 
that perish. There is nothing to show that 
they think of a life to come any more than 
the horse and ox, which have no understand- 
ing Their treasure is evidently all on 
earth. Their good things are plainly all 
on this side the grave. Their attention is 
swallowed up by the perishable things of 
time, meat, drink, and clothing, money, houses 
and lands, business, pleasure or politics 
marrying, reading or company, these are 
the things which fill their hearts. They 
live as if there were no such book as the 
Bible. They go on as if the resurretion and 
eternal judgment were not true, but a lie. 
As to grace and conversion and justification 
and holiness they are things which, like 
Gallio, they care not for; they are words and 
names they are either ignorant of or despise. 
They are all going to die; they are all 
going to be judged, and yet they seem to 
be even more hardened than the devil, for 
they appear neither to believe nor tremble. 
Alas! what a state this is for an immortal 
. soul to be in ; but O, how common. 

■ Reader, are you one of these ? if you are, 

; awake aud repent. 1 see many who have 
. aot a form of religion but alter all it is 
; nothing but a form, they profess and call 
> themselves Christians; they go to a place of 
t worship on the Sabbath, but when you have 
said that you have said all. Where is the 
religion of the New Testament to bo seen 
iu their lives? nowhere at all. Sin is plainly 
not considered their worst enemy nor the 
a Lord Jesus, their best friend ; nor the will 
of God their rule of life; nor salvation the 
great end of their existence. The spirit d 
slumber keeps possession of their hearts and 
e they are at ease, selfsatisficd and content, 
o They are in a Laodicean frame of mind 
c and fancy they have enough religion. 

!- Reader, are you one of these? if you art 
e air alee and repent. Reader, I put it solemnly 
o to your conscience^ as in the sight ot God. 
a are you one of those persons whom I have 
t just described ? There arc thousands of 
n such people iu our land, thousands in our 
country parishes, thousands in our towns, 


1872 


iHEZR/A-XTE) OF TRUTH. 


103 


thousands among churchmen, thousands 
among dissenters, thousands among rich, 
thousands among poor. Now, are you one 
of them ? if you are I fear for you. I 
tremble for you. I am alarmed for you. 

I am exceedingly afraid. What is it that 
I fear for you ? I fear everything. I fear^ 
lest you should persist iu rejecting Christ 
till you have sinned away your own soul. I 
fear lest you be given over to a reprobate 
mind and awake no more. I fear lest you 
come to such deadness and hardness of 
heart that nothing hut the voice of the 
archangel, and the trump of God will break 
your sleep. I fear lest you cling to this 
vain world so closely that nothing but 
death will part it and you. I fear lest you 
should live without Christ, die without par- 
don, rise again without hope, receive judg- 
ment without mercy and sink into hell with- 
out remedy. 

Reader, I entreat you to remember that 
the Bible is all true and must be fulfilled; 
that the end of your present ways is misery 
and sorrow ; that without holiness no man 
shall see the Lord ; that the wicked shall be 
turned into hell and all the people that forget 
God; that God shall one day take account 
of all your doings and that christless sinners 
like yourself cau never stand iu his sight. 
0, that you would consider these things ! 
Where is the man that can hold his finger 
for a minute in the flame of a candle? who 
shall dwell with everlasting burning? 

Reader I beseech you in all affection to 
break off your sins, to repent and be convert- 
ed. I beseech you to change your course to 
all your ways about religion, to turn from 
your present carelessness about your soul 
and become a new man. I offer to you 
through Jesus Christ the forgiveness of all 
past sins, free and complete forgiveness. I 
tell you in my Master’s name that if you will 
repent and turn to the Lord J esus, this for- 
giveness shall at once be your own. 0 do 
not refuse so gracious an invitation. I)o 
not hear of Christ dying for you, Christ 
stretching out his hands to you, and yet re- 
main unmoved. Do not love this poor, per- 
ishing world better than eternal life. Dare 
to be°bold and decided. Resolve to come 
out from the broad way which leads to 
destruction. Arise and escape for your life, 
while it is called to-day. Awake, repent, 
believe, pray, and be saved. 

“Sinners, turn, why will ye die ? 

God, your Savior asks you why ; 

lie who did your souls retrieve. 

He who died that ye might live. 

“Will ye not his grace receive? 

Will ye still refuse to live ? 

O, ye dying sinners, why 

Will ye grieve your God aud die? 

Selected by Jacob G. Long. 

Elkhart , hid. 


For tha Herald of Truth. 

Regeneration. 


Thou hast never been as near to death and 
eternity as thou art at this moment. Art 
thou prepared for thy departure? 


<l Ye must be born again,” John 3:7. 

These are Christ’s words and well worthy 
our prayerful consideration. Regeneration 
is among the subjects of the first import- 
ance, for Jesus says, “ Verily, verily, Isay 
unto thee, Except a man be born of water 
and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the 
kingdom of God.” In this we are plainly 
taught that the new birth is an absolute ne- 
cessity. Why must we be horn again ? 
What occasions this necessity ? The cause I 
is nearly as old as man. \\ e read that God 
created man in his own image, and placed 
him in the garden of Eden on probation. 
That man was placed on trial, proves that 
he was not immutable ; that he was suscep- 
tible of change. 

We must agree then that whatever of 
God’s attributes man possessed, immutability 
was not among tha number. Man does pos- 
sess a spiritual nature, an immortality, a free- 
dom of will, a dominion over animal crea- 
tion, &c., and in all these things resembles 
his heavenly Father ; but his most glorious 
likeness to his Creator consists in moral pu- 
rity or righteousuess. 1 his he possessed be- 
fore the fall, and as God is love so the rul- 
ing power in man’s heart must have been 
love. But the tempter camo, and by cun- 
ning led man into disobedience. After his 
fall°man could not bear the presence of the 
Lord. He hid himself, 4 and the heart 
which never knew aught but love, experi- 
enced a new emotion. 

Fear, guilty fear, destroyed all the happi- 
ness ke had, knowing that it was contrary to 
God’s law, knowing that the wages of sin is 
death. For God said, “ The soul that sin- 
neth, it shall die.” This terrible penalty 
fell upon man and instead of love, fear 
possessed the heart ot man, and he fled from 
his Maker. With the loss of God’s love in 
the heart disappeared all the purity and 
uprightness of man, leaving him a fallen be- 
incr indeed, with the foul stain of sin upon. ! 
him, and his body subject to all manner of | 
diseases. In this condition he was an ene- | 
my to his God, and a friend to all that was 
impure and unrighteous. M hen we fully 
comprehend man’s iniquity, and the de- 
pravity of liis heart, we must acknowledge 
that there is no power in man to do good, 
lienee the necessity for an entire change 
before man becomes tit for the employments 
and enjoyments of heaven. Heaven is a 
holy place, and nothing impure can enter 
its gates. Here then, we find an answer | 
to the question, Why must we be. born 
amain ? But what is the nature of this new 
birth ? We know nothing of it only as it 
appeals to our consciousness. Wc can only 
jtdtre of its results and effects. M;iny things 
are beyond reason and yet evidently true. 
Christ warns us against wearisome investiga- 
; tions, when he says “ The wiud blowetli 
where it listeth, and thou hearcst the sound 
thereof, but knowest not whence it oometh 


nor whither it goeth. So is every one that 
is born of the Spirit.” 

If we are born of God, his Spirit will bear 
witness with ours of the fact. If we have 
not this evidence, seek, Oh seek it now. 
To-morrow may be too late. Let us seek to 
regain that Bpirit of love which man lost in 
the fall, and become pure as Christ our Sav- 
ior is pure. Then shall we have power to 
overcome the world, to draw sinners to ns, 
and teach them the way of salvation ; to be 
as a city set upon a hill that cannot be hid, 
and to be bright and shining lights to the glo- 
ry of God here on earth, and kings and prin- 
ces unto God in the kingdom above. R. 

m m — 

Thy Kingdom Come. 


When at home we teach the little ones to 
pray, or in the Sabbath-school to unite with 
others in saying “Our Father,” do we real- 
ize the depth of meaning contained in the 
words “Thy kingdom come?” do we teach 
them that they have a part and lot in this 
matter ; that the lambs of the fold may join 
the prayer of faith, ever ascending like the 
smoke of the morning and evening sacrifices 
that briogeth down blessings on this world 
of sin, and that is to hasten the day ot 
millenial glory?” “Of such is the kingdom 
of heaven,” says the great head ot the 
church. Is it not meet then that they 
shonld understanding^ pray “Thy kingdom 
come; thy will be done in earth as it is in 
heaveu?” Friends of the children, let us see 
that the little ones are taught this prayer of 
prayers! Lovers of the Savior, lovers of our 
country, teach them that the kingdom is the 
Lord’s, and that he is the governor among 
the nations. 


The Bible. 


This word signifies Book ; by way of dis- 
tinction, The Book of all books. It is also 
called Scripture, or, The Scriptures, that is, 
the writings. It comprises the Old and 
New Testaments, or more properly, Cove- 
nants, Ex. 24:7; Matt. 26 : 28 . The for- 
mer was written mostly in Hebrow, and 
was the Bible of the ancient Jewish church; 
a few chapters only were written in Chaldee. 
The latter was wholly written in Greek, 
which was the language most generally un- 
derstood in Judea and the adjacent coun- 
tries first visited by the gospel. The entire 
Bible is the rule of taith to all Christians, 
and not the New Testament alone; though 
this is of especial value as unfolding the his- 
tory and doctrines ot our divine Redeemer 
and of his holy institutions. The fact that 
God gave the inspired writings to men in 
the languages most familiar to the mass ol 
the people who received them, proves that 
he intended they •hould be read not by the 
learned alone, but by all the people, and in 
their own spoken language.— Bib. Die. 


How sweet to work all the. day for trod 
and then lie down at night beneath his 

smiles ! 


ZEUEZR/j^-XjID OF TE/UTB.. 


Multi 


« rz\ | of our church, and I hear much said about 

tralh of (fmtl). ! faith, which is all proper, but James, says, 

I ‘Faith without works is dead.’ As I under- 

Tnnn 1 Q*70 stand ifc WC sh ° W 0Ur faIth ^ ° Ur W ° rkS ‘ 

Elkhart, Ind., June 1872. d bebeve a truc c Mid 0 f God, w ho possesses 

To ou* sumcuibms. — if any of our «nbscriber* do not the spirit of Christ and who has been 1C- 
g«t their I»pers regularly, or ir any persons who send lor QCWe( J j^y power and Spirit of God, will 
hooka, Ac., do not obtain them in due time, they will confer , 11 .Ammaml 

a faTor by informing ua, and we will do our best to have not refuse to Comply W ltll t 


everything properly forwarded to its destination. 



How to sum Mottrr. — If in sums more than a dollar, it 


ments.” 

Remarks. — This is true If we love 


nun TV Pidif tuuniii. ai ■»* v * — ' 

(attest to obtain either a draft, or a Post Office money Qod and our Savior, WC Surely Will liot re- 
registered w k* r * tUeM cannot b * ° bUiM<1, ^ ^ fuse to keep the commandments; they will 

°i A ] • . * . v. be our delight. 

Those of onr siibscribors who do^ot wish to take the 
Herald of Truth any longer, will pleftae to inform ns of — 

the fact by letter and pay up all Arrearages and the j, the Church ill Elkhart 

matter shall have our prompt attention, otherwise it will . , . , 

,e considered that they wish to continue their subscriptions COUIlty. The Brethren J . EurknOlaer 

f - — and B. Suavely, from Lancaster county, Pa., 

Mcnno Simon’s Complete Works, in have visited some of the churches in Ohio 
the English language are now ready for de- an ^ xni n0 j s an d 0 n the Gth of June they 
livery. All who wish to obtain this valua. a j so stopped w ith us and attended meeting 
hie work may have it promptly forwarded afc y ellow Creek Meeting House, on Friday 
to them, by sending in their orders to this June tbe y th We f e l t sorry that other du- 
offico. The price of the work is $4.50 cents ^ prcveuted ua from meeting with the 
per copy. Any person taking 12 copies brcthrcn ou that occasio n. We hope also 
will receive one gratis. We have gone to a ^ ^ Lord may blcgs the effort to sow the 
great expense in translating and publishing and fcbafc otbers 


the work, so that our people might have the 
opportunity to examime and read the wri- 
tings of the eminent reformer whose name 


good seed of the word of life and that others 
may follow the example and also visit their 
brethren in the west and see how they do, 


tines Oi tno eminent reiormer wuuese uarnc , , , ip . 

h , , , . , r . , and speak to tlipm words of encouragement 

our church bears, and we hope our lricnds [ . 

V . . from the word of God. 

will feel an interest in selling as many copies . T *i 

A meeting was held on Saturday June the 
as possible. Single copies of the work may „ , , , v i 

be^eent b, mail! and those wishing to have f * f.«m » Meetog house where a good- 

then, thus sent will please add ,64cto to the ly ^mber of people were present. Bro. J. 

r , T . , , M. Brcnneman of Allen co., Ohio, was with 

price for postage. It may be obtained at , „ , , 

, . „ . , us and on Sunday 27 persons were baptized, 

the following places: , , . , , . , 

J. E. Barr’s Bookstore, Lancaster, Pa. »° d t "S c,llCT ,' tlth ono , who , hi,d b “" J 0 ’ 
J. C. Hunsicker, Berlin, Waterloo co., Ont. claimed, received iuto church membership. 


” — 7 f 

Jacob Funk, near Line Lexington, Bucks 
county, Pa. 


On Monday there was an appointment at 
Yellow Creek, where five persons were also 


CUUUIJ, A <*• XC11UW Vvlt’tJlij WUUIU live pCiOUUD m t'A V ftiou 

J^obN^Iirubaker, Mount J oy. Lancas- baptized and received into the church. Justas 
tCr john Baer^s Sons, Lancaster-}'.. the baptismal services were concluded, Bro. 


was chosen at Blosser’s Meeting-house; there 
were six candidates and the lot fell upon 
Bro. Jacob H. Wisler. May the Lord bless 
him in the important duties of his office. 

On Sunday the 16th the communion of 
the Lord’s Supper was observed at Holde- 
man’s Meeting-house, where a large number 
of persons wore present. 

We also enjoyed the privilege of a visit 
from Bro. C. C. Beery, from Fairfield county, 
Ohio, who on his way to Stephenson county, 
111., stopped with us over Sunday, and spoke 
in the Elkhart church, in the forenoon, and 
at Sh aim’s, at G o’clock in the afternoon. 
Wc trust these meetings may not have been 
in vain, and may God’s blessing rest upon 
them. 

The Mennonites in Russia —In 

another column will be found an article, 
“The Mennonites,” which has been going the 
! rounds of tho Press, and appears to have 
had its origin in despatches from St. Pe- 
tersburg, the capital of Russia. From what 
we have learned from a private corrcspond- 
j ence from a brother residing in Berdiansk, 
we know that the matter of emigrating has 
been considerably* Fpoken of and there is a 
probability that a deputation may visit this 
country during the present season, and it is 
1 also likely that some of them will emigrate 
before a great while, but as to their emigra- 
ting to this country in a body is doubtful. 
The matter however is one which demands 
i our sincere sympathy, as the giving up ol 
home and cnigratiDg to a foreign land on 
• account of religious liberty is a matter of no 
; small sacrifice. Let us not forget our breth- 
> ren on the other side of the great waters. 


The Martyrs’ Mirror in English 


the baptismal services were concluded, Bro. 
C. I). Beery from Michigan arrived, having 
been delayed somewhat, on account of not 


The subscribers for this valuable work are j be ; ab j e t0 et a tra j n S00 ner. 

; l_ nr- i ° .. 


coming in slowly. Wc hope o’ur friends 
who are interested in the publication of the 
work will make an effort to send in their 
lists as soon as possible. 


In the afternoon the communion of the 
Lord’s Supper was observed at the same place, 
of which a large number of brethren and sis- 
ters took part. 

On Tuesday there was meeting in Locke, 


, r. „ iopto un luesaay mere was meeuug ju ajucive, 

Our Family almanac for 1873 , , , % , , 

will bo printed again by about the first of wherc also four P erson3 wcre ba P‘ ,ZC(1 and 
August. If any of our patrons or others to the church, and m the afternoon a 

have any articles, or items of interest that sllort scrvicc was hekl at tbe house of Henry 
they wish to have inserted they will please Rickert who was confined to his bed by rea- 
send them soon, in order that they may be son of sickness. "W e hope the Lord will be 
ready in time. : with him and restore him to health that he 

j may serve him in all faithfulness unto the 

A Brother writes from Pa., “In my ( end. 
neighborhood there aro very few members j On Wednesday tho 1 ‘2 th of June, a deacon 


Sinful Amusements.— The Confer 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
recently held, adopted a resolution, amend- 
ing their disciplinary rule, against impru- 
dent conduct so as to condemn “neglect of 
duty of any kind, imprudent conduct, in- 
dulging sinful tempers or words, the buying 
; or selling or using intoxicating liquors as a 
beverage, dancing, playing at games of 
chance, attending theatres, horse-races, 
circuses, dancing-parties, or patronizing 
dancing-schools, or taking such other amuse- 
ments as are obviously of misleading or 
questionable, moral tendency, or disobedi- 
ence to the order and discipline of the 
church.” 

This step, though looked upon with con- 
tempt by some and even ridiculed and scoffed 
at by others, is a subject of great importance 
and one upon which all ivill do well to re- 
, fleet. The love of pleasure and worldliness, 


r 


105 


1872 


HIZEIRaA-IjID of tieltttiel 


in other words, worldly conformity, and the 
love of gain are the baits by which Satan 
catches thousands of souls and leads them 
to destruction. Let no one be deceivod 
thereby. Many indeed under the guise of 
a good moral character and a Christian pro- 
fession, are seeking to explain away all the 
badness of these things, in order that their 
own lust and inclinaiions t may be the more 
readily gratified ; but every reflecting man 
or woman and even young children know 
that it does not become a professor of re- 
ligion and a follower of Jesus to dance, 
play at games of chance, goto theaters, balls, 
circuses, dancing-schools, horse-races, or to 
sell intoxicating beverages. It is certainly 
very unbecoming for a Christian to be a 
saloon keeper ; and there are many other 
points which might be touched upon here 
whmh men try to make right in order to 
gratify their carnal inclinations. But one 
might say. Where will you draw the line ? 
Right hero my friend- If you can glorify 
God by it, and benefit your own soul — if it 
has a tendency to bring you nearer to God, 
and causes you to grow in grace; if you 
can ask God’s blessing upon it, believe that 
the Spirit of God will go with you, then it 
is not wromg. But when you do anything 
upon which you can not ask God’s blessing 
with a clear conscience, or if you would go 
to a place at which you feci that you would 
not like your best friend to see you, thon 
you should not commit that act — you should 
not go to that place. “Pure religion and 
undefiled before God, and the lather is 
this, To visit the fatherless and widows in 
their afflictions and to keep himself un- 
spotted from the world”. Let us cultivate 
moral purity and holiness. — Editor. 


where we had to stay Qver night. 
Next morning we took the train 
north. At New Paris, Bro. Christo- 
ph el left me, and I went on to the 
town of Elkhart, without a change 
of cars. I visited around among 
the bretliern in Elkhart County, 
until the 17th, attended 9 meetings; 
37 persons were added to the church, 
all by baptism except one. Several 
more made application to be added. 
Twice was the Lord’s Supper celebra- 
ted. A deacon was ordained in Chris- 
tophel’s district; the lot fell on Bro. 
J acob H. W ialer. May the blessing 
of God rest upon him, and may he 
be enabled faithfully to discharge 
his duty in the church, and Oh! may 
the blessing of God also rest upon 
those dear souls who have just given 
their hearts to him, and made the 
solemn covenant. Oh ! may they be 
watchful and prayerful, both day 
and night, lest the enemy lead them 
astray, and they again be caught 
in his net. Dear children, forget 
not your promise to the all wise God. 
Be faithful unto death, and a crown 
of life shall be yours. And may the 
rich blessing of God rest upon all 
the dear brethren and sisters in 
Elkhart, and bind them together 
with the bonds of love. Amen. On 
the 17th I reached home safely and 
found all well, thanks be to God 

J. M. Brenneman. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Merits of Christ. 


Sorrtsponhtncc. 


A Visit to Indiana. 


On the 31st of May, myself and 
wife, and Pre. Peter Basinger from 
Columbiana County, Ohio and his 
brother from Riley Creek, in Allen 
co., Ohio, took the train at Elida, 
and went within 5 miles of .Ft. 
Wayne, then south to Berne station 
in Adams co., Ind., and stayed un- 
til tuesday the 4th of June, attend- 
ed four meetings and also celebrated 
the Lord’s Supper. Brother John 
M. Christophel, preacher from Elk- 
hart, Ind., also met us there, we 
enjoyed ourselves quite well among 
the brethren, and feel thankful for 
the love they manifested to us, while 
we were with them. On Tuesday 
afternoon, myself and wife and Bro. 
Christophel, took the train at Berne 
and went to Ft. Wayne, from where 
my wife returned home, and I with 
Bro, Christophel went to W arsaw, 


“ We have peace ■with Goil through 
Jesus Christ,” Rom. 5: 1. 

That man is by nature depraved, 
is a universally admitted fact. That 
on account of man’s wickedness 
there is enmity between him and his 
heavenly Father. How can man be 
accepted and justified with this load 
of iniquity, and his heart in open 
rebellion to God? Man has never 
been able to solve this problem, 
though hundreds have attempted it. 
God’s doctrine is plain, and he who 
will not accept Christ as the way, 
can never see salvation. We are Jed 
to inquire, AVhat are Christ s ments 
that they can effect so much in our 
behalf ? This is an important ques- 
tion to both seeker and professor, 
for daily we ask God's blessings 
through the merits of Christ. Have 
you ever considered them? Have you 
ever thought what they were? Are 
you pleading that, day after day 
which you do not comprehend? Let 
us spend a few moments in investi- 
gating their character. 


Merit is something deserved. For 
instance, you engage a laborer to 
work on your farm, promising a 
certain sum for a specified amount 
of work. As soon as the work is 
completed he has merited his pay, 
and you would do wrong by refusing 
his wages. But how does this apply 
to Christ’s merits ? Did he promise 
to secure onr salvation for us? Have 
we any claims upon him ? Is he un- 
der any obligations to us ? None at 
all. Then his merits cannot be taken 
in this sense. Suppose you should 
fall sick while away from home and 
be brought near the gates of death, 
your life only being saved by the 
constant watchfulness of a stranger 
who attends to your every want even 
to the neglecting of his own. What 
gratitude would till your heart 
for such kindness! Words would 
fail to express it, and you would 
feel under life - long obligations 
to him, which if possible would 
only be increased at learning that 
this service was all done from love 
to man, and not for gain. Such con- 
duct would be meritorious in the 
highest degree. Such is the merit of 
Christ. While we were dead in 
trespasses and sin, he came to save 
and rescue us from our fallen con- 
dition and exalt us to a life of right- 
eousness. Who will deny merit to 
Christ? Who can deny obligations 
for this voluntary service so glori- 
ous in its results and privileges to 
man? But what gives these merits 
value in God’s eyes that we may ask 


V til UV> A AX Vi v/v*. « n S'* 1 

for eternal life through them? God 
loves mankind, though fallen far be- 
low the estate when first created, and 
whatever is for man's good, has 
merit with him. 

If Christ’s atonement changed the 
condition of man for the better, it 
was doing the Father a service. Oh ! 
of what infinite merit must the life 
of Christ be with God, for he healed 
the sick, gave sight to the blind, 
hearing to the deaf, strength to the 
weak, and vigor to the lame. He 
cast out evil spirits and performed 
many deeds of mercy, which none 
else were equal to. He gave the 
world an example of a most hon 
life. He taught mankind how to 
overcome temptation, how to bear 
trials, which was of infinite value 
to a people surrounded by evil and 
suffering. He taught the true char- 
acter of God and the justice of the 
law. He was the author of a reli- 
gion which raises fallen humanity 
to the favor of God. Whose base 


106 


HEBALD OE TIRATTIH:. % u l » 


is so broad that it reaches to the 
uttermost parts of the earth ; its 
towers so high that they reach to 
heaven; its strehgth so enduring 
that all the kingdoms of the world 
can not overthrow it. 

We have enumerated many mer- 
its of Christ, and yet we have just 
begun. Even the greatest merit 
known to us has not been mentioned 
—his death and resurrection, the 
most grand and glorious of all. By 
these he becomes surety for us, bear- 
ing all claims of the outraged law 
and making a way whereby con- 
demned man may be justified. Who 
doubts the merits of the life and 
sacrifice of Christ? We can no more 
estimate them than we can mark the 
boundaries of eternity. Why should 
we hesitate to seek pardon, even 
though our sins be many ? There is 
merit enough for all. It is inex- 
haustible. All may come and par- 
take of the water of life freely. 
Praise be to God for this blessed as- 
surance. B. 

- — — — — -m* 

For the Herald of Truth. 

LINES, 

Written on the doath ofour beloved brother, 
Levi Longenecker, who died on 
the 20th of March 1872, in 
St. Joseph eo., Ind. 

Farewell dear friends to all below, 
Though all so kind and dear to ine ; 

My Jesus calls me as you see, 

I hope you’ll try and follow me. 

Weep not for me my brothers dear, 
Since I must go and leave you here, 
With Jesus I shall happy be, 

O father, sisters, weep not for mo ! 

O, what are all my sufferings here, 
Compared with joys so sweet; 

With the enraptured host t’ appear, 
And worship at his feet. 

In that bright, happy laud of rest, 
We’ve another sister blest, 

In Jesus arms tbey sweetly rest, 

In Jesus arms they’re blest. 

There nobler songs of sweet essays, 
Fill every heart with joy; 

There we may of its virtues reap, 
There we will have no cause to weep. 

Yes there we’ll meet, in joy complete, 
Eternally to dwell ; 

At Clod’s right hand a happy bund, 
No more to bid farewell. 

My suffering time shall soon be o or, 
There shall 1 sing and weep no more, 
Angels shall bear my soul away, 

To sing God’s praise in endless <Jtiy. 

J. M. 0UT.HERT.SON, 

Mishawaka, Ind. 


Heaven. 

• 

In heaven there will be no more 
tears! “It is tearless, because it is 
sorrowless, it is sorrowless, because 
it is sinless; it is sinless, because it 
is the dwelling-place of the holy 
Lord God, and of the spirits of just 
men made perfect. How magnifi- 
cent the description! ‘And God 
shall wipe away all tears from their 
eyes, and there shall be no more 
death, neither sorrow nor crying, 
neither shall there be any more 
pain.’ 

“Confide in the uncliangeableness 
of Christ’s love. Nothing shall 
take it from you, or separate you 
from it. It ebbs not with the ebb- 
ing of your feelings, it chills not 
with the chill of your affections, it 
changes not with the changing 
scenes and circumstances of your 
life.” — Winslow. 

— « • 

The Mcnnonltes. 

From recent despatches from St. 
Petersburg, it appears that the Men- 
nonites, a sect numbering some forty 
thousand souls, will probably leave 
Russia in a short time and emigrate 
in a body to either tlie United States 
or Canada. The creed of tlie Men- 
nonites closely resembles that of the 
Friends, one of tlieir principal doc- 
trines of belief being non-resistance 
— that war is unlawful and military 
service sinful — and the reason of 
their leaving Russia is that the gov- 
ernment of that country has recently 
rescinded the law which exempted 
them from military duty, thus mak- 
ing their further stay in the Empire 
incompatible with their religion. 
The sect had its origin at the time 
when the Anabaptist and other 
mystical beliefs nourished in the 
Netherlands, its apostle being one 
Menno Simon, who, having been a 
priest in the Roman Catholic 
Church, abandomed Catholicism 
and preached a doctrine whose fun- 
damental elements were charity 
and faith, and who sought by liis 
teachings to restore the simplicity 
of the Primitive Church. About 
the time of the death of Menno 
Simon, a large number of the “Men- 
nonites” emigrated to East Prussia, 
settling near Elbing, Dantzig and 
Marienburg, where they remained 
until 178 l J, when, in consequence of 
certain arbitrary laws passed con- 
cerning them by the Prussian au- 


thorities, many of the sect accepted j 
an invitation, which had been ex- 
tended to them as early as 1786 by 
the Empress Catharine II., to settle 
in Russia, and emigrated to that 
country, their traveling expenses 
being defrayed by the Russian gov- 
ernment, which also granted one 
hundred and ninety acres of land 
to each family, ten years exemption 
from all taxes, exemption forever 
from military duty, and many other 
privileges and immunities. A large 
portion of the Mennonites remaining 
in Prussia in after years followed 
their pioneer brethren to the new 
home, and by the beginning of the 
present century they formed a ^col- 
ony numbering some fifteen hun- 
dred souls, a number which since 
that date lias increased, as stated 
above, to nearly forty thousand. 
The Russian government lias always 
shown great consideration for the 
sect, and they have been allowed to 
govern themselves by tlieir o wn laws, 
thus pratically forming, except 
that they paid taxes to the State, 
an independant government within 
the dominions of the Czar. It was 
not without reason that so much 
favor was shown the Mennonites, 
for they were and are subjects that 
any country might be glad to own. 
Settling originally on a barren 
steppe, devoid of water, trees, or 
plants, they truly made the wilder- 
ness a very garden, introducing 
artificial watercourses, planting for- 
ests and orchards, and raising agri- 
culture to a higher degree of excel- 
lence than in any other portion ot 
Russia. As stock-raisers they have 
also been exceptionally successful, 
while manufactures have been by 
them carried to great perfection and 
extent, there now being no less than 
three hundred and fifty mills and 
factories of various kinds in opera- 
tion in their territory, while in tlieir 
villages are men proficient in al 
most every known calling and trade. 
Crimes are exceedingly rare amongst 
them, and popular education is 
one of their fundamental laws ; in 
short, as a race and as individuals, 
their character is such as to make 
them a very desirable acquisition 
to any country in which they may 
choose to reside. That it is to the 
interest of our Government to en- 
deavor to obtain them, now that 
the opportunity is offered, as resi- 
dents of the United States, is very 
plain, as their natural thrift, intelli- 
gence, and self-dependence mark 


1872 


107 


HEBALD OB’ TBTJTH. 


| 

them out distinctly as fit citizens of 

the Great Republic. Indeed, the 
law-abiding nature and thrift of the 
colony of the sect already establish- . 
ed in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, affords abundant proof of 
the desirability of having added to 
it either further additions, or else 
of having a new colony founded, in 
some other portion of the Union. 
There is one obstacle in tlie way of 
the Mennonite hegira from Russia, 
and that is the Russian law, which 
forbids a subject to leave the coun- 
try without the consent of the au- 
thorities, and although there is little 
doubt but that this consent would 
be accorded to one or two, or even 
to ten or twenty of the sect, but when 
permission is asked for the. en - 1 
tire forty thousand to leave in a 
solid body it is extremely doubt- 
ful whether the Government will 
grant the permission desired. For 
the United States, however, Russia- 
has always professed a high regard, 
and it is quite possible that al- 
though for their own individual 
asking the Mennonites would not 
be allowed to emigrate, yet it is by 
no means improbable that if their 
request was urgently seconded by 
our Government, it would be grant- 
ed, and the advisability of thus 
urgently seconding it is evident, 
both on the grounds of lending as- 
sistance to an oppressed people 
and on the grounds of political 
economy and self-interest, that it 
seems to be the plain duty of our 
Government to take sucli action ifi the 
matter as will secure to tlie United 
States a colony of people who will 
add so largely to the morality, 
wealth, and intelligence of the na- j 
tion. — Phila. Press. 

The Goodness or God. 

In all the earth there is no name 1 
like the name Jehovah. Through- 1 
out all the earth there is no heart 
like his. There is no love or wel- ■ 
come such as he grants to them who 
come unto him. He invites all to , 
come back, to enter into and to 
dwell in him. If we be bumble, | 
though we be cast into the extreme- 
ties of life lie will not disdain us. 
It* we are bumble and contrite lie 
delights to dwell with us. We 
should rejoice that he is thus wel- j 
coming all those who seek him, 
helping their infirmity, and that 
his mercies extend not only to those 
who come unto him, but that he is , 


awaking, by bis word and spirit 
those that sleep and those who are 
dead in sin, and by all bis influen- 
ces drawing souls back unto him, 
their Source and their Head. We 
should thank the Lord continually 
for all his mercies to us. We should 
consider the goodness of God, 
“wherein he hath helped us,” and 
when we have brought before the 
mind all tlie bounties and blessings 
it can comprehend we should re- 
member that there are many others 
which we do not understand. Tlie 
gifts of God to mankind are more 
numerous than the leaves in summer. 
They shine more brilliantly than 
the stars at night, illumining our 
way all through life — filling it with 
comfort and blessedness, and their 
full purposes of good to the soul are 
yet unfulfilled. God is long suffer- 
ing toward us, waiting for us to be 
able to appreciate and to enter into 
the fruition of bis nature. As wewait 
for our children, watching them and 
taking care of them until they come 
up to us, so the Lord waits upon j 
us to bless us abundantly more than 
we can imagine. When we arrive 
in the other and better world, when 
we have come to tlie measure of the 
stature of perfect men in Christ 
Jesus, our eyes shall be cleansed, 
then we shall see liow thickly God s 
mercies were strewn along our path- 
way through life. All men should 
rejoice in God’s immeasurable gen- 
erosity, and in the out- flowing ever- 
pouring abundance of liis thoughts 
and goodness to them, notwithstand- 
ing tlieir rebellious, unworthy nat- 
ures. What is man that he should 
withstand God’s holy nature ? Fear, 
guilt, remorse or humiliation should 
not take us away from God, for it 
is because of our weakness, our in- 
firmities and our wickedness that 
lie desires us to come to him, that 
lie may strengthen, forgive and 
cleanse us from all sin, and that he 
may establish us forever in liis 
righteousness. We should not keep 
away from God because we lia\ e 
been selfish, neither by reason ot 
tribulation or sickness should we 
fgf\is 0 to be filled with tlie unbound- j 
ed love of God. Under all the 
varied circumstances of life we 
should look up to God as the au- ; 
tlior and finisher of that faith the 
end of which is the salvation of the 
soul. Oh that men would every- 
where be willing to be won by the 
goodness and gentleness of a mer- 
ciful, indulgent God, that they ( 


might know liis greatness, bis pow- 
er, and liis willingness to accept 
abundantly tlieir feeblest endeavors 
to come to him, — that they might 
understand how he will not break a 
bruised reed nor quench smoking 
flax until he brings forth judg- 
ment unto victory. But, alas ! 
among the innumerable host are on- 
ly a few, here and there one, who are 
walking upon the narrow way, who 
are striving “to enter in at the 
strait gate.” For the goodness 
which God gives unto many they 
return ingratitude. Their eviden- 
ces of indifference and disobedience 
are heaped up before him like moun- 
tains of iniquity. But if they come 
out from darkness and turn to God 
to seek him he will be found of 
them. He will cause tlieir burden 
of sin and guilt to roll away and 
instead will give them a burden 
that is light and a yoke that is easy. 
He will permit them to see, by 
faith, that there is beyond the. tear- 
ful, clouded days of this life, a 
place where the weary are forever 
at rest. God helps all his cross- 
l bearing children to see, even under 
the most distressing circumstances, 
to find a comfort — a soul-cheering 
view of the goodness which is laid 
up for them in heaven. All who 
are sorely tried with pain, . with 
burdens, with cares and weariness, 
until they almost lose the ambi- 
tion of life, for whom there seems 
to be nothing but a rough path 
down to the grave, whose earthly 
prospects are as a shattered mirror, 
to all such there remainetli a rest 
that no storm can disturb. Our 
earthly friends will leave us, tlie 
enjoyment of health will soon be 
gone, our earthly treasures will fl\ 
away, worldly honor is as a bubble, 
all tilings terrestrial are passing 
away. But the goodness of God^ 
they that are born of him will on 

dure forever. . 

God gives glorious privileges 
unto men, but many disregard them. 
They do not see them. They grovel 
through life with their minds uncul- 
tured, undeveloped. Oh, that they 
might be filled with anguish that 
they should bear such souls, which 
are so benighted— missing the en- 
joyment of tlie goodness ot God. 
When the conscience is stained 
with sin, when the heart is filled 
with guilt— when our lying down and 
rising up is in company with fears 
and remorse, God will abundantly 
bless and forgive if we turn our 


108 


herald of truth 


8*«l 


faces toward his loving kindness 
and his forgiving love. May the 
time speedily come when all men 
shall be taught of God, and shine 
forth in the beauty of true religion, 
and may his kingdom come until 
the whole earth shall be tilled with 
his goodness. — Pilgrim. 


Severe Misfortune in Missouri. 

[The following letter was received 
after the English Herald for June 
was printed.] 

St. Martin’s, Morgan Co., Mo., j 

May 28th, 1872. ) 

Dear Bro. Funk: 

It is alone through the grace of 
God that we are yet here, and that 
I have the opportunity to write to 
you, for the Almighty God has 
manifested his omnipotence unto us. 

About C o’clock last Sunday even- 
ing, there was a tornado in this 
vicinity, which developed itself with- 
in three quarters of a mile of my 
house, and blew down a house in 
which no person resided. There it 
drew, as it were by the providence 
of God, a little to the left, and pass- 
ed four rods north of my house in 
a southeasterly direction. If it had 
continued in its course as at first, it 
would have passed between our 
house and Bro. Kauffman’s, which 
are about thirty-live rods apart, and 
undoubtedly it would have gone 
with us as with the others, of whom 
I will inform you. 

At the time the tornado passed 
by, there were in our house besides 
the family, two of Bro. Wingard’s 
sons; it carried fence rails about 
thirty rods, tore a portion of the 
roof from my house and reduced 
it to fragments. This was done in 
a twinkling. As soon as the storm 
was over, Bro. Kauffman andlwalk- 
ed across the field to the next neigh- ! 
bor, whose house and everything lay 
scattered about, and a terrible sight 
presented itself. The neighbor and 
his family were covered with blood 
and dirt by a pile of ruins, the par- 
ents being severely injured, while the 
three children remained unharmed. 
We used every effort to remove the 
family to the next house as quickly 
as possible, for we saw that Bro. 
Brundage’s house, a half mile ofl, 
was also blown down. In a short 
time we were there, where a mourn! ill 
scene was before us; but some breth- 
ren and neighbors had already ar- 
rived. Before us lay the house of 


Bro. Brundage, about ten rods from ) 
its foundation; but the saddest of 
all was that which befel the inmates. 
Bro. Jacob Blosser, who lived in the 
house with Bro. Brundage, was 
killed; near him lay his wife with 
her child bleeding and lamenting; 
the child, Sophie E., died at 11 
o’clock that evening, aged 1 year, 

G months and 21 days. Two rods 
farther lay Sister Brundage, severely 
injured, and in the greatest agony; 
near her stood her son, covered with j 
blood and dust, so that I did not 
know him; however he was not 
much injured. While we were pro- 
viding for these severe afflictions 
here, we observed also that Bro. 
Peter Blosser's house, 80 rods dis- 
tant, was blown down, and we learn- 
ed that his wife was somewhat in- 
jured. 

At the same time we learned that 
Bro. John Driver’s house was also 
destroyed, but they came to the 
neighbor’s house, and were not much 
hurt. Medical aid was given to the 
wounded before midnight. 

On Monday the people came from 
all directions to see the result of the 
tornado. At 4 p. M., Bro. Jacob H. 
Blosser was buried. Sermon by D. 
I). Kauffman and B. Wein, from 
Matt. 24 : 44. There were m any pres- 
ent, all of whom manifested their 
sympathy with the bereaved. 

The loss in property is great, es- 
pecially that of Bro. Brundage, in- 
asmuch as he is old, and it is im- 
possible for him to cover his loss, 
for there is nothing of his left; all 
his buildings, his means of subsist- 
ence, furniture, bed-clothes, and their 
clothes are gone, even the clothes on 
their persons were torn ; so that they 
barely escaped with wounded bod- 
ies, hence their need of assistance is 
great. 

At the time of the disaster, Bro. 
Brundage was attending Conference j 
in Illinois. 

All who were injured are improv- 
ing. 

Lorenzo Horciiheimer . 

D. J). Kauffman. 

Remarks — In this case all can 
see their duty. Let us, then, render 
assistance to the afflicted, as mem- 
bers of one body; for if one member 
suffers, then they all suffer. If any 
person has somewhat to bestow, he 
can send it direct to the deacon, 
Jacob Huber, St. Martins, Morgan 
Co., Mo.; or if any will send to us, 
we will see that it will be properly 
sent. Editor. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

To the Young. 


WISE CHILDREN TAKE ADVICE. 


“ A wise son maketh a glad father; 
but a foolish son is the heaviness of 
his mother,” Prov. 10:1- 

( Conclusion .) 

We occasionally hear some persons say, I 
am just as goqd as others, if even I am not 
baptized and united to a religious society. 

It makes no difference, I can continue to 
live in my unconverted state at present ; I 
can make a good appearance and act before 
people as though I was a good Christian, 
they will not know any better. But, ah, 
my friend, God knows if you are acting the 
hypocrite. If I become converted, be bap- 
tized and unite with some church, my com- 
panions will point the finger of scorn at me. 
and say all the evil against me they can ; I 
will have no company ; my pleasures will 
all be gone. But, my friends, let not such 
thoughts enter your minds. What makes 
you think and believe so? I would answer ; 
The tempter, the devil that instills into the 
minds of the people such erroneous doc- 
trines, is transformed into an angel of light. 
“As a roaring lion he goeth about seeking 
whom he may devour, whom resist, stead- 
fast in the faith,” by refusing to yield to 
temptations, but persevere in that which is 
good. Though the devil is subtle and 
powerful, he is busy and untiring in his 
efforts to lead men to destruction, yet the 
weakest believer may effectually resist him 
by watchfulness and prayer to Jesus for 
assistance. If you seek an interest in the 
righteousness and reign of Jesus, he will 
bestow it unto you. O, how great is his 
goodness. “ Only fear the Lord and serve 
him in truth with all your heart.” Con- 
sider how great things he hath done for 
you. 

“Seek ye the Lord while he may be 
found ; call ye upon him while he is near 
“Be careful for nothing; but in every thing 
by prayer and supplication with thanksgiv- 
ing let your requests be made known unto 
God.” He will not leave you comfortless. 
Christ giveth; he saith, “I will not leave 
you comfortless.” Literally : orphans be- 
reft of my presence, as children bereft of 
the presence of their father, “I will come 
to you.” Spiritually : “ To comfort all that 
mourn; to appoint unto them that mourn in 
Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, 
the oil of joy for mourning, the garment ot 
praise for the spirit of heaviness ; that they 
might be called Trees (or Children) el 
righteousness, The planting of the Lord, 
that he might be glorified.” O, my young 
friends, waste not this precious time where- 
in you could work out your salvation. “ For 
what is your life ? It is even a vapor that 
appeareth for a little time and then van* 
isheth away.” How uncertain is your life- 
How soon may death cut you off from your 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


friends. We are convinced that we must 
once die, prepared or unprepared. But 
how, where and when, we know not; no 
man can reveal death to us. Duty and in- 
terest require that we should so live as to 
be always ready, whether we die suddenly 
or after a lingering illness. Xo sooner shall 
we be “absent from the body” than we shall 
be “ present with the Lord,” if we are his 
children, beholding his glory and rejoicing 
in the fullness of his love, that everlasting 
glory, which “ Eye hath not seen nor ear 
heard, neither have entered into the heart 
of man, the things which God hath pre- ( 
pared for them that love him.” Oh, would 
we not all like to enjoy that beautiful home 
which abideth for ever, where there will be 
no moro sickness, sorrow, tribulation, and 
death ; where no tears will be shed ? 

But all will be joy and happiness for ever. 
The question might arise, What shall we do 
to be saved ? John says, “ Repent ye and 
believe in the gospel,” and Deter says, 
“Repeat and be baptized every one of you 
in the name of Jesus Christ, for the re- 
misson of sins, and ye shall receive the gift 
of the Holy Ghost,’’ Acts 2 : 38. It is the 
duty of all men, young and old, to save 
themselves from eternal ruin, by repenting 
of their sins, and seal that repentance with 
baptism, and believe on the Lord Jesus 
Christ, that their sins may be blotted out, 
and consecrate themselves wholly to his ser- 
vice. “Put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ.' 
Clothe yourselves with his character and 
spirit. All should loook upward to him, 
that his heavenly influence may descend in 
copious effusions, and the evils of sin be- 
come as the frosts of winter on the ap- 
proach of spring; and vanish as darkness 
before the light of day. Wait not for a 
more convenient season, or think I will put 
it off until some other time, till old 
age or sickness comes, there will then be 
time enough to call upon my God, and 
make peace with him. Alas my friend, 
none of these opportunities might ever 
come. God might withhold his spirit from 
you, for he says, “ My Spirit shall not al- 
ways strive with man,” In the twinkling 
of an eye death might summon you Irom 
time to eternity, without any warning. 
Almost daily do we hear of persons, young 
and old, whose prospects for long life were 
good in the morning, and in the eveniug 
they were a corpse. 

What would become of our poor souls it 
we were to die in an unprepared state ? They 
would be banished from the presence oi 
God, into a place of everlasting torment, 
where there will be wailing and gnashiug 
of teeth. Then what^ould our companions 
or the world, or the riches thereof help us 
at that day? Nothing. God alone is able 
and willing to help us, if we call upon him 
sincerely, for he is faithful and will not 
suffer us to he tempted above that we are 
able. The Lord is good, a stronghold in 
the day of trouble; and he knoweth them 
that trust in him. Trust in the Lord and 
he will help you. “ Delight thyself also in 


the Lord and he shall give thee the desires 
of thine heart ” “ Acquaint now thyself 

with him, and be at peace ; thereby good 
shall come unto thee.” “For then shalt 
thou have thy delight in the Almighty, and 
shalt lift up thy face unto God.” 

Perchance, if you turn to God you may 
be the means of bringing your companions 
also to him. If all young people would go 
hand in hand and put on the Lord Jesus 
Christ ; follow his footsteps, “ and be clothed 
with humility, it would be well, for “God 
resisteth the*proud ant ^ g iv eth grace to the 
humble,” 1 Peter 5:5. I advise you, my 
young friends, “Seek ye out of the book of 
the Lord, and read : Xo one of these shall 
fail, none shall want her mate ; for my 
mouth it hath commanded, and his spirit it ; 
hath gathered them,” Isa. 34: 16. “Let 
the word of Christ dwell in you richly in 
all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one 
another in psalms and hymns and spiritual 
songs, singing with grace in your heai-ts to 
the Lord.” Submit cheerfully to the deal- 
ings of God’s providence. 

The Apostle says, “ Humble yourselves, 
therefore, under the mighty hand of God, 
that he may exalt you in due time ; casting 
all your care upon him, for he careth for j 
you. Be sober, be vigilant ; because your p 
adversary, the devil, as a roaring lion, g 
walketh about, seeking whom he may de- 
vour.” Therefore, “ Watch and pray that j j 
ye enter not into temptation ;” pray always 
that ye may be accounted worthy to escape I 
all these things that shall come to pa% and 
to stand before the Son of God, for we are j 
all born in sin, and apt to do evil. Satan, 
that wicked one whom God cast out ol 
heaven, tempts us to wish for what is wrong 
in the sight of God, and to make us feel 
angry and proud ; and to say things that 
are not true. We must look to God for 
grace to keep us from evil when we are 
tempted to sin. 0 1st us learn from Jesus, 
to obey God, and not mind satan when he 
whispers mischief in our ears. If you wish 
to be like Jesus, hear what he says to you, 

! “ Come, and learn of me, for I am meek 
and lowly in heart ; and you shall find rest 
unto your souls.” "W ould you not desire to | 
enjoy the blessedness ot Christs kingdom , 
and dwell therein for ever? There are* 
crowns of glory to he given us, and garments 
that will shine like the sun in the firma- - 
meut of heaven. There shall be no more 
crying or Borrow, for Jesus will wipe all . 
tears from our eyes. ’There we shall be 
with seraphim and cherubim. There also 
we shall meet with thousands who have 
[ gone before us to that place ; none of them 
I are hurtful, but loving and holy ; every one 
walking in the sight of God, and standing 
in his presence for ever. 

In a word, there we shall see the ciders 
with their golden crowns, there we shall see 
holy virgins with their golden harps, Rev. 
4:4; 14: 1 — 5; there we shall see men 
that by the world were cut in pieces, burnt 
in flames of fire, eaten of beasts, drowned 
in the seas, for the love that they bare 


to the Lord Jesus. O would you not like 
to live in that beautiful; homo that abideth 
forever? If wo be truly willing we all may, 
for the Lord Jesus has promised it. Jn. 6: 
37; 7 : 37. Jesus said, “Him that comefh 
to me 1 tcili in no icite cast out.” Delay not 
repentance. 

“ O ’tis a folly and a crime, 

To put religion by ; 

For now is the accepted time, 
To-morrow you may die. 

Our hearts grow harder every day, 

And more depraved the mind ; 

The longer we neglect to pray, 

The less we feel inclined. 

Yet sinners trifle, young and 'old, 

Until the dying day ; 

Then they would give a world of gold, 
To have an hour to pray. 

O then, lest" we should perish thus, 

We would no longer wait; 

For time r will soon be past with us, 

And death will fix our state.” 

Jacob Kilmer, 
Winesburg, Holmes Co. 0. 


bxltrrctt s -department 


Verses for Youiijr Children. 


God lives on high 
Beyond the sky, 

And angels bright, 

All clothed in white, 
The praises sing 
Of heaven’s King. 

This God can see 
Both you and me ; 

Can see at night, 

As in the light: 

And all we do. 
Remember too. 

’Tis he bestows 
My food and clothes, 
And my soft bed 
Te rest my head, 

And cottage neat, 

And mother sweet. 

And should not 1 
Forever try, 

To do what he 
Has orderetfme, 

And dearly love 
This Friend above ? 

I always should 
Be very good : 

At. home, should mind 
My parents kind ; 

At school obey 
What teachers say. 


Now if I fight 
And scratch and bite ; 
In passions fall 
And bad names call ; 
Full well 1 know 
Where I shall go. 

Satan is glad 
When 1 am bad : 

And hopes that I 
With him shall lie 
In fire and chains, 
And dreadful pains. 

All liars dwell 
With him in hell, 

And many more 
Who curs’d and swore; 
And all who did 
What God forbid. 

And I have not 
Bone what I ought, 

I am not fit 
With God to sit, 

And angels bright 
All clothed in white. 

I will confess 
My naughtiness ; 

And will entreat 
For mercy sweet. 

O Lord, forgive, 

And let me live. 


My body must 
Bo turned to dust ; 
Then let me fly 
Beyond the sky, 
And see thy face 
In that sweet place. 


herald of truth. 


/ For the Herald of Truth. 

From a Child. 

1 am but a little child, a little pilgrim in 
this world, and Jesus Christ is my Redeemer. 
This is a very sinful world, and I too am 
a great sinner, but Jesus died for me, to 
redeem me from the sin ol Adam, and I 
pray Jesus that he may guide me with his 
Spirit of truth, that I may not be led astray 
in my childish days, and in the days of my 
youth. I pray too that the Lord may renew 
my heart and make mo a new creature, that 
I may be a true child of Jesus, that when 
my 60 ul shall leave its earthly home it may 
find rest in heaven. Amen. 

S alin a Smoker. 

S/truce Ilill , Juniata Co ., Pa. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

The Way to Heaven. 


Dear little friends, last month I told you 
I would try to tell you where and how to find 
the way to heaven ; and now I shall try to 
do so. The wisest and best being who has 
ever lived in this world used to express a 
large part of his teaching by taking common 
objects of nature and familiar customs of the 
people and putting them in the form of 
beautiful parables, intended to illustrate 
and teach men spiritual truths in a plain 
way. So I shall try to illustrate what I have 
to say by a little comparison. 

Many people cross the ocean every 
summer in great ships to visit the old 
countries.” They travel in Germany, Switz- 
erland, England, France, and other foreign 
lands ; and some press on still farther and 
visit Asia and Africa, llow do these people 
find the way to and through those countries 
so far away ? Could roe find the way to one 
of those distant countries — to Germany for 
instance? Yes we could ; and just in the 
same way as those travelers do of whom I 
told you above. 

In the first place, when these people once 
make up their minds to cross the ocean and 
travel in foreign lands, they get. very much 
in earnest about the matter. They talk and 
think about, it every day. If they meet any 
one who has experience in traveling, they 
try to learn as much as possible from him 
about the best route to take, and the pleas- 
ures, the dangers, and the difficulties of 
such a journey. Rut, they do not depend 
merely on hear-say. They provide them- 
selves with a “ guide-book ” in which are 
directions as to the best route to travel, with 
descriptions of the people and the natural 
and historical curiosities to be seen and en- 
joyed, and cautions as to the dangers and 
difficulties likely to be met. They read and 
study their “ guide-book ” carefully and 
refer to it often on their journey. So, you 
sec, that these people do f. id the way to 
foreign lauds, about which they at first 
knew as little as you or I. In the 
same way you or 1 could find it, which is 
simply by being very much in earnest and by 
reading and studying our “guide-book” 
often and following its instructions. 


Now, you and I are traveling, and if we 
would find the way to heaven, we must get 
at the matter in about the same way as we 
would take to find the way to a foreign land, 
that is, first, roe must be in earnest. And it we 
are really interested heartily in this matter, 
we shall often think of it, and, perhaps, talk 
about it with our young friends and with 
old and experienced persons. 

Christians are pilgrims, or travelers heav- 
enward ; with such people it will be a 
delight to talk and to learn from them what 
we can. Secondly, we must not fail to read, 
and strictly obey the book which God him- 
self has given unto men as a guide-book to 
heaven. It will surprise some of my little 
friends to hear of a guide-book to heaven. 
Why, that is just what they wanted ; they 
never knew there was such a book or, pei- 
haps I should say, they never thought cf the 
matter in that light, for whatever else the 
Bible may be called, it is the book that shores 
the way to heaven , and that is just what 
we want. 

You will find many things in the Bible 
that you will not understand, but you will 
also find much that you can understand. 
But, let one be ever so quick at learning, 
yet, if he would rightly understand the 
Bible, lie must have the good Spirit of God 
to show him the truth. AVe should, there- 
fore, ask God for his Spirit to guide and 
help us to a right understanding of his 
good Book. If we ask, he will give, for so 
he has promised, and so he will do. 

Your friend, J. K. Hartzler. 

Mr Veytown, Pi t. 


For the Herald of Truth. 

A Pleasant Way. 


“ Her ways are ways of pleasantness, 
and all her paths are peace.” Prov.3 : 17 


Dear children, last month I told you 
about a hard way ; a way that is hard to 
every one who walks in it. Now 1 will tell 
you about a pleasant way; a way that makes 
every one happy who walks in, it. The 
difference between the hard way and the 
pleasant way is so great, that it can hardly 
be told. It can only be felt and realized 
by those who have tried both. 

‘ This pleasant way is the way of wisdom. 
AH who love and fear the Lord, and keep his 
commandments arc in this pleasant way. Da- 
vid says, “ The fear of the Lord is the begin- 
beginning of wisdom ; a good understanding 
have all they that do his commandments.” 
Solomon says, “ Tlappy is the man that 
findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth 
understanding; for the merchandise of it is 
better than the merchandise of silver, aud 
the gain thereof than tiue gold. She is 
more precious than rubies; and all the 
things thou caust desire are not to be com- 
pared unto her. Length of days is in her 
right hand, and in her left hand riches and 
honor. Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and 
all her jiaths are peace.'’ 

There are many things that make this 
way pleasant, some of w r hich I will tell you. 


God loves those who walk in it, and there- 
fore makes it pleasant to them Jesus is the 
friend and companion of every one who is in 
this way, and this makes it pleasant. They 
who are in this way have the children of 
God for their companions and friends, who 
love them and do all they can to make them 
happy, and this makes the way pleasant. 

All who are in this way feel sure that 
God will take care of them; they believe 
that when they die, Jesus, that dear friend 
who was with them in life will still be 
with them, and will take them to that beau- 
tiful world above, and these thoughts make 
the way pleasant. 

Those who walk in that hard way often 
become afraid. AVhen they think of dying 
they become afraid, because they know that 
God does not love them, and that if they 
should die, he would punish them for then- 
wickedness. Often when they lie down at 
night they are afraid they might die before 
morning ; but those who are in the pleasant 
way have none of these fears. Solomon says 
to them, “When thou best down, thou shalt 
not be afraid ; yea, thou shalt lie down, and 
thy sleep shall be sweet.” 

There are still many more things to make 
this way pleasant. If those who are in the 
hard way could only be persuaded to come 
into the pleasant way, they would have nu 
more desire to walk in that hard and un- 
pleasant way. My little readers, in which 
of these ways do you think of traveling? 

I hope you will all say, I will try to travel in 
this pleasant way, 

If you think you will go in the pleasant 
way, let me say to you, do not think you 
will first go in the hard way for a time, and 
then go in the pleasant way. These are 
very foolish thoughts. A great many people 
have done this, and while they were in this 
hard way, disobeying God, he took then- 
lives from them; and now they must be 
punished forever, and can never he happy. 

None were ever sorry that they com- 
menced to walk in wisdom’s ways when they 
were young, but thousands who waited until 
they were old before they left the hard way 
and then began to walk in the pleasant wav, 
were sorry they did not begin when they 
were young. 

Now dear little friends, if you think you 
would like to walk in this pleasant way, you 
must ask God to help you make a beginning 
while you are young; before the evil days 
come, aud the years draw nigh when yon 
shall say, I have no pleasure in them. 

Just think how foolish it is for people to 
think they will disobey God, and go in tin- 
hard way, and be miserable and unhappy 
until they are old, before they will begin t<> 
obey God, who made them and keeps them 
alive, and gives them all these good things 
which they enjoy ' It is just as foolish as it 
would be if one who was sick would say. 
“1 will not do anything to make me well; 1 
want to he sick a long time before I shall 
take any medicine, or do anything to make 
me well.” 

I want to walk in the pleasant way as long 


i 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 



as I live; do not you, my little friends? 
May Hod help us all to walk in it. 

Brother Henry. 


FOOD FOR THE LAMBS. 


Now therefore hearken un- 
to me, O ye children ; for 
blessed are they that keep 
my ways, Prov. 8 : 32. 

Do not my words do good 
to him that walketh upright- 
ly ? Micah 2:7. 


bronchial affection, Anna Johnson, aged 45 yrs., j On the 6th of June, in Wayne oo., Ohio, of 
3 mos., and 21 days. A husband and two daugh- dropsy, Magdalena , wife of Christian Lehman, 
ters are left to mourn their loss. Death however, aged 69 yrs., 10 mos., and 1 day. Buried on the 
we feel was gain to the departed sister. Funeral 8th in the Sonnenberg grave-yard. Sermon by 
services by D. Brenneman, from 2 Cor. 5:1. Chr. Sommer at the house, and by C. P. Steiner, 

„ . , of Allen co., at the meeting-house. She leaves 

Now rest thy weary head an affectionate husband and 3 sons to mourn 

From care and labors free ; their loss. She had a full share of earthly suf- 

Thou dost but sleep ! thou art not dead . f(jringg tQ endure A few ycar8 ftg0 she fell on 

iy ace again we see. th e stove and burned her right arm so badly that 

\ On the 31st of May, in Stephenson co., 111., of amputation became necessary. She bore all her 
lung fever, Preacher Christian Snyder aged 42 afflictions with patience, 
vrs . 5 mos., and 28 days. Funeral discourses On the 12th of June, in S 


The following Table will show those who 
wish to read the Testament in the way pro- 
posed wliat chapter to read each day. 


Days. 

Chapter. 1 Days. 

Chapter. 

July 

19 

Rev. 

15 Aug 

4 

Matt. 

9 

U 

20 

it 

16 

5 

tt 

10 

ft 

21 

tt 

17 “ 

6 

tt 

11 

tt 

22 

tt 

18 “ 

t 

it 

12 

it 

23 

it 

19 “ 

8 

tt 

13 

tt 

24 

. tt 

20 “ 

9 

tt 

14 

it 

25 

u 

21 “ 

10 

tt 

15 

it 

26 

a 

22 “ 

11 

ft 

16 

ft 

27 

M att. 

1 “ 

12 

tt 

17 

It 

28 

tt 

2 « 

13 

tt 

18 

tt 

29 

ti 

3 “ 

14 

tt 

19 

tt 

30 

tt 

4 “ 

15 

tt 

20 

a 

31 

tt 

5 “ 

16 

tt 

21 

Aug. 

1 

tt 

6 

17 

it 

22 

U 

2 

tt 

7 i “ 

18 

ft 

23 

tt 

3 

tt 

8 “ 

19 

ft 

24 


This table can be written on a piece of pa- 
per and kept in the Testament for a mark. 

§ i r b 


On the 26th of April, in Grundy co., 111., of 
scarlet fever, George, aged 2 mos., aud 20 days. 
And on the 4th of May, Rebecca, aged 2 yrs., 9 
mos., and 9 days, children of Lewis and Nancy 
Kulp. Funeral discourse by II. L. Shelly, from 
Rev., 14: and part of the 13th verse. 

On the 29th of April, in Juniata co., Fa., at 
the residence of her son-in-law, J. L. Vanart, 
Sister Martha Kinzer, aged 72 yrs., 8 mos., and 
25 days. 

Mother, thou hast gone before us, 

Where thy saintly soul has flown, 

Tears are wiped away forever, 

And all sorrow is unknown. 

Bach, like thee, in peace departing, 

To the kingdom of the blest, 

Where the wicked cease from troubling. 

And the weary are at rest. L. L. V. 

On the 26th of May, in Morgan co., Mo., death 
caused by the fall of a house, Jacob II. Blosser, 
aged 26 years. 

Also at the same time, Sophie IC. Blosser, aged 
1 yr., 6 mos., aud 21 days. Funeral sermon by 
D. 1). Kauffman and D. Wein, from Matt. 24 : 44. 

On the 3rd of August, 1871, Mary /’..daughter 

of Jacob H. and Blosser, aged 2 yrs., 3 

mos., and 28 days. 

On the 30th of May, in Fayetto co., P.i , of 


yrs., 5 inos., and 28 days. Funeral discourses 
were delivered by Joseph Burkholder, of Lancas- o 
ter co., Pa., Matthias Eby and Benj. Lapp, of d 
Missouri. He w-as sick only a few days ; having s 
attended Conference in Whiteside co. and remain- a 
ed there over Sunday, he took sick on Monday t 
night and was with difficulty conveyed to his j 
home, where he lingered until Friday about N 
noon, when be went to his final rest. He was a 1 
preacher in the Mennonite Church for a number i 
of years, and had the good will and love of all. 
Little did we think that when we bade him fare- J 
well the Saturday previous that he should so 1 
soon be called to his final account, lie leaves a i 
deeply afflicted wife and nine children to mourn i 1 
his unexpected death. The Church there too ] : 
will feel that there is a vacant place in their j ! 
midst. May God grant that it may soon be filled 
again by a faithful laborer in the vineyard. We 
hope he has gone to the rest prepared for all 
those who love him. 

On the 6th of June, in Cass co., Mich., of rheu- 
matic fever, Sarah Ann, twin daughter of Alex- 
ander and Louisa Fredricka Caiyer, aged 9 yrs., 

2 mos;, and 4 days. The little girl was a promis- 
ing child, and was beloved and esteemed by those I 
who knew her. She was especially dear to her 
parents, being a twin child and of an exceedingly 
kind and loving disposition. But we trust that 
she is in the arms of a blessed Redeemer, and 
therefore we would not mourn as those who have 
no hope. God bless the mourning parents, broth- 
ers and sisters, that they too may all meet their , 
Savior in peace. 

On the 6th of June, in Logan co., Ohio, of 
dropsy and a disease of the lungs, Lydia, only 
daughter of John C. Yoder , aged 14 yrs., 10 mos., 
and 12 days. Funeral discourses by John P. 
Kinig in German, and Joseph Kauffman in En- , 
glisb, from 2 Cor. 5 : 1 — 4. 

On the 21st of May, in Montgomery co., Fa., 
Catharine , wife of John Q. Clemens, aged 37 yrs., j 
and 13 days. The deceased was beloved by all | 
who knew her for her virtues and Christian con- 
duct. 

On tho 8th of May, in Bucks co., Pa., Amanda, 
daughter of Jacob M. and Susanna Leothcrman, 
aged 26 yra,, 4 mos., and 22 days. Buried at the 

old Deep Run Meeting house. Sermon by 

Godschalk, at the house, and Isaac Moyer at the 
meeting-house, from 2 Cor. 4 : 17. 

On the 14th of June, in Elkhart co., Ind., of 
typhoid fever, Salome, daughter of Abraham and 
Anna Culp, aged 2 yrs., 11 mos., and 22 days. 
Buried on the 16th, at Yellow Creek meeting- 
house. 

On tho 13th of June, in Osceola, St. Joseph 
co., Ind., Cora Ellen, daughter of Solomon and 
Susan Ilulburn , aged 2 yrs., 1 month and 2 days. 
Her death was caused by a piece of a fish bone, 
which, in the attempt to swallow, lodged in her 
throat. Sfie lingered several days until death 
put an end to her sufferings. But we feel assured 
i | that she is in that better land where sorrows can 
• never come, and where the deeply afflicted pa- 
rents may meet their loved one again. 

1 On tho l«t of May, in Wayne co., Ohio, ».f 
y dropsy of the heart, Maria, wife of Abraham 
Moser, aged 51 yrs., 4 mos., and 28 days. She 
r leaves a husband aud 7 children to mourn their 
3 loss. Buried on the 3rd, in the Sonnenburg 
grave yard. Sermon by Chr. Schneck at the 


On the 12th of June, in St. Joseph co., Ind., 
of dropsy, David Klingaman, aged 86 yrs. and 1 
day. For the last three years his sufferings were 
severe, yet he bore it with patience. During his 
affliction, he worked out his salvation with fear and 
trembling. Funeral service by Samuel Gettig 
and M. W. Shcnk, from Luke 18: 7, 8 ; Gen. 3:22. 
K On the 12th of June, in Grundy co., 111., of 
bronchitis and general debility, Abraham Bueh- 
icalter, aged 78, years 4 months and 26 days, he 
was a faithful member of the Mennonite Church 
55 years and a deacon in the church 10 years, he 
leaves a bereaved widow and seven children to 
mourn their loss, yet they mourn not as those 
having no hope ; he frequently expressed himself 
as being willing and ready to go to God. Funer- 
al services by H. L. Shelly in german from Rev. 
14: 13, and by Pre. Hart in english. 

On the 3rd of June, in Lagrange co., Ind., of 
lung fever, Peter Lumbrich, aged 73 yrs., 9 mos., 
and 17 days. Buried ou the 5th, at which time 
au appropriate address was delivered by John 
C. Yoder and Joseph Miller. He leaves 6 cbil- 
I dren and 30 grand-children to mourn their loss. 


letters UecctbelJ. 


Chr Herr. 

MONEY LETTERS. 

B — Eli E Borntreger $1 ; Noah Byler 30 cts ; 
Jacob N Brubacher $1 ; John F Boldosier 25cts; 
John Bixler SI ; Abrahhm Bitschy $1 ; G. Z. 
Boiler $12 ; Lydia Buckwalter $1 ; N Brunk $1; 
John Baer $3 50. 

C — Peter Culp $2 ; John Cassel Si 50. 

D — John Driver $3 ; C T Detweiler $4 50- 
E — Benjamin Eicher $23 ; Samuel Eberly $1 ; 
James Everts 75cts ; E R Ebersole 50cts. 

F — Mrs M Fieles 25cts. 

G — Noah Grabill $1 ; Elizabeth Gafl' $1. 

II — John W Hoover $1 10 ; John Ilaga $1 25 ; 
Amos Herr $2 ; Anna Huber $1 ; Joseph Iler- 
shey lOcts ; Benj D Hershey $9 ; C Ilooly $1 50. 

K — Michael Kilmer 50cts ; Annie Kulp Si ; 
Jacob Kindy $1 ; Joseph Kaufman $1 50. 

L — Emanuel Lichti $1 ; Jacob H Landis $1 ; 
J B Larimer 30cts ; Chr A Lehman Si. 

M — Isaac H Moyer $5 25 ; Catharine B Metz 
d l 50 ; 1* S Miller $1 : Peter D Mishler $7 ; 
A Murnmert Si ; Abm Mc-tz $6. 

N — John Neiswanger $1 50 ; Jacob II Nicode- 
miis $3 ; Christian Nafzigcr $2 ; Iieuj Neff $1. 

p — I C l’lank S2 ; Philip II Parrel $1 ; Sevilla 
raff$l. 

R — John Hoop 50c t s ; Jacob Rediger $2 ; R B 
lteigert lOcts. 

S — Michael Souder 25cls ; Benjamin Stauffer 
$1 50 ; Jacob Sharp $2 ; Henry Suavely $1 50 ; 
Maria Slienk $1 50 , Christian Schlanter 50cts ; 
Nicholas Stecker $2; Nicholas Schertz $2; Anna 
II Stoner Si ; Christian Schenk 25cts ; Benjamin 
Shoemaker •$•'> 60 : Joseph Lias $1 ; Elias Shantz 
:j;ti 50 ; Peter Stauffer S2 50. 

S John B Tyson .1 70 ; David A Troyer $3 15. 

V — Peter Vircler SI 50. 

W— John Witmcr $2 : Jacob D Weaver $1 50- 
Y — Samuel 1 oder Si >0. 

Z — Joseph Zehr $2 ; Jon K Zook ‘JOcts ; Shcm 


house, aud Chr. B. Steiner at the moeling-housc. j Zook ?'2 70; Peter Ziegler 40cts. 


op truth. 


S«»s 


For Books. - Jacob H Nicodemus $3 ; Jacob 
Shenk $2 30 ; C T Detweiler $5 *5 ; Ahm Roth 
$3 ; Samuel Stemen $6 ; J C Hunsicker $-1 94 
Contributions for the Brethren in Missouri 
who suffered from the storm on Sunday, May 28. 
Church in Elkhart Co., $116 65 ; Ghurchm 

Burr Oak $5 05; m Haw Patch $11 ; 

Henry Gerber $5 ; Henry L Martin $ 1. 

TIME TABLE. 

hake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad. 

Passenger trains on and after June 2nd, 1872, 
leave Elkhart aB follows: 

GOING EAST. 

Accommodation, (Air Line,) 12,05, r. m. 

Special New York Expr., (Air Line) 1.40, r. m. 
Atlantic Express, (Air Line) 9,o6, p. m. 

Night Express, (Main Line,) 1,10 a. m. 

Mail, (Main Line) IJIO f.J. 

Grand Rapids, "i 45 p ’ M ’ 

GOING WEST. 


» Pe uF.Sr™ 0EiPr '“' 2,40 I! M. ! 

Night Express, > 

Pacific Express, 

Accommodation p - » ’ , 

Elkhart Accommodation, .” )U Y. A - 

Grand Rapids train arrives from White 1 lgeou 
at 1,30 r. m., and returns at 2,45 r. m. 

Cincinnati, Wabash and Michigan train arrives 
via Goshen at 11,35 a. m., and departs via Goshen 

at 1.45 p. m. _ , . .. . . . 

gj.jy- AH trains run on Cleveland time wnicn 

is 20 minutes faster than Chicago time. 

8^*“ Sleeping cars on all night trains. 
fliqy - Time and fare the same as by any oth- 
er route. _ 0 . 

Charles Paine, Gen. Supt. 

C. W. Greene, Agent, Elkhart. 

Books for sale at this office. 

The following books aro sent by mail, postage 

^ The English Mennonite Hymn Book. Anew 
edition of the English Mennonite Hymn Book has 
just left, the press, and is now ready for delivery, 

at the following price : 

Single copies, by mail postage prepaid bU 

Per dozen, “ “ " , $ 6 00 

• < -» “ sent by express at purchasers 

expense ----- 6 00 

Pocket edition, - - - * " 

The German Spelling Book, a work of 100 
pages adapted for schools, Sunday schools, and 
those ’who wish to study the German language 
without a teacher. 

Price per copy, by mail. - - - ■“& 1 

Per dozen, by express at purchasers ex- 
pense - * " . " ~ ^ 

For larger quantities special rates will be given 

on application. . ,, ,,, , , 

We have yet a small number ot the Virginia 
edition of the Confession of Faith, translated by 
Joseph Funk and also published by him, which 
we will send, postage prepaid, to any address in 
the United States, for 75 cents. 

Anoenehme Stunden in Zion. The little Book, 
“ Angenehme Stunden in Zion” written by Ulrich 
Steiner, a Mennonite minister in Switzerland, to 
the Sonnenbcrg church in Wayne county, Ohio, 
has been reprinted and may again be obtained at 
this office, at the following rates: 

Per single copy, postage prepaid, - $9 10 

dozen, “ “ - ; 100 

“ hundred, by express, at purchasers 

expeusc, - - - 7 . J ' 

This is a beautiful little work, in the German 
language, worthy of being road by all 


60 

$6 00 


German Catechism or Question Book. We 
have just republished a small German Catechism, 
which was originally published by the Mennonite 
church in Germany, and republished in 1824 by 
the brotherhood in Canada. This little book is 
especially adapted to the use of children in schools 
and Sabbath schools, and wherever our brethren 
maintain German Sunday schools, they should 
have of these books. 

The little Catechism may be had at our office, 
at the following prices : . . * n in 

Single copies, per mail, postage prepaid, $ y 
Per dozen, “ “ “ J ™ 

“ hundred, by express, - ‘ ou 

Repentance Explained, is the title of a little 
book of 80 pages, written by Chas. Walker, D. D., 
and published by the American Traot Society, 
and is a choice little work for young people and 
children, though it may be read with profit by 
older people also. It is a book which we would 
recommend to be read by all. The price of the 
book is 25 cents, by mail 30 cents. 

A new Edition of Christianity and War, in the 
English and German languages has been issued. 
Send for a copy. Price, lOcts. 

Also a new Edition of Pride and Humility, Eng. 
and Ger. by J. M. Brenneman, has been issued. 

Price per single copy lOcts, per dozen 75 cts. 

EnoRah Mennonite Ilvmn Book, $ .60 


Ernsthafte Christenpflicht 65 

Johann Arad’s Complete works (Ger.) 
including Arad’s Wahres Christenthum, 
Paradies Gaertlein, &c. 3.60 

Buck’s Theological Dictionary “ 3 25 

Bibles, I 2 00, 4 00 

Cottage Bible, with notes, in two volumes, 

per volume by express 4.00 

Health, or how to live 1.25 

Brown’s Pocket Concordance 60 

Mind and Words of Jesus 60 

Morning and Night Watches 60 

The Words and Minds of Jesus, and the 

Faithful Promiser 80 

Bound volumes of the Herald of Truth for 
1864, 1865, and 1866, bound in one volume, 
English or German, by express 3.75 

For ’67, ’68 or ’69 each year bound in a separate 
volume, per volume, by mail, Eng. or Ger. 1.65 
The three years together in one volume, 
by express $3.60, by mail $4.00. 

MUSIC BOOKS. 

THE HARMONIA SACRA, published by Jos. 
Funk’s sons. 

Price per single copy, Postage prepaid $ 1.40 
“ “ doz., Express charges at 

purchasers expense 12.00 

“ “ “ “ prepaid 14.50 


$0 10 
1 00 

- 7 50 


English Mennonite Hymn Book, $ .60 

Conversation on Saving Faith, 1 .75 

(Confession of Faith, ) English / 

a “ German .60 

English-German Testaments -65 

German Bibles, small size 1-00 

English Bibles “ “ l.jjj 

German Testaments, small Bize .20 

«( << large size, with clasps 1.60 

u “ with noteB 2.00 

English Testaments, small size .15 to .50 

<> *< large size .40 fit .60 

Dymond on War *60 

Should Christians Fight? .10 

Peace Manual _ -60 

Prince of the House of David, English, 2.20 

.< << »* “ German, 1.65 

American Tract Primer, Eng. or Ger. .40 

German and English Primer .45 

German Spelling Book by B. Eby. .25 

Bible Text Book -45 

Bible Reader’s Help -40 

Ahn’s German Grammar l- 28 

Heinrich Funk’s Erklaerung 1.60 

Oehlschlagers Eng & Ger Dictionary, 1 70 

Adlers “ “ “ 2 80 

Adlers large “ “ “ by express 7 00 

Letter Writer, Eng and Ger 1 75 

Websters Dictionaries, 75, 90, 1 20, 1 46 a 2 50 
Habermans German Prayer Book 30 

“ English “ “ 30 

Fox’s Book of Martyrs, English 3 00 

<« •» “ German 4 00 

English Testaments with notes 1 10 

ii “ ** Psalms 1 40 

German “ “ “ 1 10 

Dictionary of the Bible, by express 6 00 

44 *4 44 Illustrated 1 85 

Pilgrims Progress, English or German 75 

History of the Patriarchs, Eng and Ger 65 

Iluebners Bible History, English < 1 20 

Fleetwoods Life of Christ ' -s 3 75 

Spurgeons Sermons, per volume 1 50 

Menno Simon’s Foundation (Ger.) 2.25 

I Unparleiisches Gesangbuch, with clasps 1.6C 

I Geniein8ckaft.liche Lieder-Sammlung 

(mennonitisches Liederbuch) .6C 

I Unparteiische Lieder-Sammiang 
1 (amisches Liederbuch) -6( 

Spiegel dcr Taufe (Ger.) -4t 


THE SONG CROWNED KING, published by 
Rubush and Kieffer. 

Price per single copy, postage prepaid, $0.60 
“ “ doz. 6.00 

THE CHRISTIAN HARP AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL SONGSTER published by Rubush and 
Kieffer. Price per single copy, 35 cents, per 
dozen $3.00, postage prepaid 

GLAD HOSANNAS. A new Music Book for 
Sunday Schools. 100 pages of new Music. 
Price per single copy, 30 cts. ; per dozen, $2.76. 

THE GOLDEN CITY SONGSTER by Rubush 
and Kieffer. A work of 32 pages of New Music 
and Hymns. Price per single copy 10 cents, per 
dozen $1.00 postage prepaid. 

THE ALLEGANY COLLECTION by A. N. 
Johnson. A collection of new and excellent 
church music of 380 pages. Johnson’s system for 
learning to read music is unsurpassedby any now 
published. One copy prepd. $1 40, per doz. $12. 

Any person desiring any books that we 
have not on hand, we will send for them and 
forward them at the publisher’s prices’ 

jpcntlir of <|rMtb. 

A Religious Monthly Journal. 

Devoted to the interests of the Mennonite Church 
the exposition of Gospel truth, and the 
promotion of practical piety among 
all classes, is published by 

JOHN F. FUNK &. Bro., Elkhart, Ind., 

in English and in German, at $’1,00 a year in 
either language, or $1,50 for both the En- 
glish and the German paper to the 
same person, or one copy, six 
months, fifty cents. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Persons subscribing should be particular 
state whether they wish the English or the 
German paper. Specimen copies sent free. 
Address, HERALD OF TRUTH, 

Elliliart 111 cl. 


Monaonite Book Store, Book and Job Printing, and Book Binding, by J. F. FUNK & Bro., Elkhart, Ind. 


A RELIGIOUS MONTHLY JOURNAL. 


Vol. 9 -No. 8. 


“How bcautirul arc the feet of them that preach the Gospel of Peace.’ 

ELKHART, INDIANA, AUGUST 1872. 


Whole No. 104 


Through Night to Light. 1 

i 

FROM THE GERMAN BY TETER 11. STAUFFER. 

Through night to light ! And may terrific sad- , 

Envelop gloomily the world ; [ness 

Be not afraid ! for after midnight’s darkness 
Will follow sunrise, sweet and mild. 

Through storm to rest ! And may both earth and 
Be shook by roaring tempests wild, [heaven 
Be not afraid ! tornado’s wild confusion 
Is followed by a calm so mild. 

Through work to sleep! Although the heat of 
Be resting on you burdensome, [noonday 

Be not afraid ! fresh ev’ning breeze will alway 
Be wafting yet ere day is done. 

Through cross to crown ! And may earth, s nto- 
Like giants pertly menace you, [lestation, 
Be not afraid ! when painfnl lamentations 
Are o’er, God’s peace is granted you. 

Through woe to bliss! Although you're sadly 
At early morn aud ev’ning late, [weeping 
Be not afraid ! Jehovah is providing 
Your wants however small or great. 

Through death to life! From out this vale of 
From out t his field of work and strife [sadness, 
The Lord will lead his children soon with gladness, 
To fadeless joy and endless life. 

For the Herald of Truth. 

The Unanswerable Question of the 
Great Salvation. 

BY J. M BRENNEMAN. 

“How shall we escape if we neglect 

so great salvation,” Heb. 2 : 

( Concluded.) 

I think the passages quoted should he 
sufficient to convince us that there is, surely, 
great danger of punishment, from which the 
disobedient cannot escape. 01 tremble, ye 
who feel so secure ! Ye slothful and luke- 
warm, O tremble, before sucdi a '"fearful 
looking for of judgment and fiery indigna- 
tion, which shall devour the adversaries.” 

»< Behold, the .1 udge standeth before the 
door,” Jas. 5 : 9. ' “ The great day of his 
wrath ” is fast approaching. 0, therefore 
11 work out your salvation with fear and 
trembling.” Escape for your lives; stand 
not still; look not behind you; be uot sloth- 
ful in this important, matter ; remember 
Lot’s wife. It is terrible fur all impenitent 
sinners to fall into the hands of the hiving 
God! There will indeed be no esca’pe for 
them. Therefore, “ See that ye refuse not 
him that speaketh ; for if they escaped not 


who refused him that spake on earth, much 
more shall not we escape if we turn away 
from him that speaketh from he«aven,” Heb. 
12 : 25. “For if God spared not the angels 
that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and 
delivered them into chains of darkness to 
be reserved unto judgment ; and spared not 
the old world, but saved Noah the eighth 
person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing 
in the flood upon the world of the ungodly. 
(They regarded it not, says Jesus, until the 
flood came and took them all away, Matt. 
24 : 37, and how shall we escape if we 
neglect this great matter ?), and turning | 
th? cities of Sodom and Gomorrah into 
ashes, condemned them with an overthrow, 
making them an ensample unto those that 
after should live ungodly,” “ suffering the 
vengeance of eternal fire (as Jude says, 
ver. 7), therefore let us fear that we may 
escape such a terrible end. 

God also destroyed Pharaoh and his host 
in the lied Sea. They could not escape. 
Neither could the rebellious company of 
Korah, Dathan and Abiram escape, but the 
earth opened her mouth and swallowed them 
up and they went down alive into the pit, 
N urn 16 : 32, 33. 

The stiffnecked Jews who crucified the 
Captain of our salvation and despised his 
saving and comforting doctrine, could not 
escape the reproving hand of God. He sent 
forth his armies, destroyed those murderers 
and burned up their city. And those who 
will not better themselves and walk in a 
new life in the day of grace, will also all be 
destroyed. The rich man who here in this 
world fared sumptuously every day, lived 
happily and clothed himself in purple and 
fine linen could not escape, for in hell he 
lifted up his eyes, being in torment and 
called very lamentably to Abraham for 


mercy, “ for ’ says he, “ I am tormented in 
this flame.” The Savior no doubt declared 
this unto us that we might take warning 
by it, and 0, how good would it be for many 
thousands of poor souls, if they would take 
warning by these things, that they might 
not also go to that place of torment. 

We have an account of another rich man 
whose field brought forth much, who would 
build his barns larger and then gather into 
them all that his fields had produced, and 
his goods, and say to his soul, “Soul, thou 
hast much goods laid up for many years ; 
take thine ease, eat, drink aud be merry, 
wbo could not escape, for God said to him, 


“Thou fool, this night shall thy soul be 
required of thee ; then whose shall those 
things be which thou hast provided ?” 
Thus it will be with those who gather for 
themselves treasures and are not rich towards 
God, for “ they that will be rich fall into 
temptation and a SDare, and into many foolish 
aud hurtful lusts, which drown men in de- 
struction and perdition.” And how shall 
we escape if we, contrary to the prohibition 
of the Savior, exert ourselves day and night 
and seek to gather for ourselves perishable 
treasures here upon the earth, and thereby 
neglect our salvation ? “ For what is a man 
profited if he shall gain the whole world and 
lose his own soul; or what shall a man 
give in exchange for his soul ?” Hence we 
should guard ourselves against the love of 
money. Wealth is uncertain and deceptive, 
yea, perishable and vain. 

It will be a useless excuse in that great 
day to say, I have bought a piece of land, 
or a yoke of oxen, and my temporal engage- 
ments detained me, therefore I could not 
come. O what folly it is for us to esteem 
temporal things more highly than eternal 
things, while yet we know not what to-mor- 
row may bring forth; for to-morrow, yea, to- 
day already we may die and be called into 
eternity, and then we must leave all our 
temporal goods behind us, no matter how 
securely we have trusted and built thereon ; 
and how shall we escape when the hour of 
death cometh and we have no treasure and 
no home in heaven. 

It is indeed greatly to be regretted and 
lamented, as we look forth into the world 
and see how little this eternal salvation is 
regarded by mankind in general. The 
greatest part of their attention and study is 
directed to the obtaining of riches, pleasure 
and honor and to be highly esteemed in the 
world. It iB indeed terrible to reflect upon 
the gluttony, drunkenness, gaming, cursing, 
swearing, lying, deception, adultery, forni- 
cation, stealing, robbing and murdering 
which is continually carried on in the world ; 
and who can describe the astonishing pride, 
and extravagance, the adorning of the body 
and the disgraceful decorations which the 
world practices t () how shall they escape . (I 
| cannot but believe that there is a speedy and 
terrible judgment hanging over the world). 
And if we are prompted by love to reprove 
aud admonish the people on account of such 
wickedness, it seems to them ridiculous, and 
they scoff over the matter. The Savior 



114 


HERALD OE TRUTH. 


says, “But as the days of Noe were, so 
shall also the coining of the Son of Man 
be ;” they regarded it not. And again, 
“Nevertheless, when the Son of Man com- 
eth, shall he find faith on the earth ?” As 
though he would say, The true, saving faith 
will almost be extinguished and have pass- 
ed away from among mankind, at his second 
coming. 

O dear brethren, Should we not earnestly 
examine ourselves, whether we he in the 
faith, or whether we perhaps only have the 
name that we live and are dead ? It iB 
plain and manifest, and we dare not deny it, 
that generally in regard to religion, there is 
too much lethargy (lukewarmness) and in- 
difference to be found among us Mennonites, 
who should walk as “ children of the light,” 
before the world. What do we most desire 
and labor for ? To which are our thoughts 
most inclined, and which seems to be ot the 
greatest importance unto us ? "which do we 
esteem the more highly, eternal salvation 
or the world? Usually that which we 
esteem the most is much upon our minds ; 
we think about it a great deal, and reflect 
upon it. If it is a precious treasure, of which 
we expect to obtain possession, the heart 
will be filled with it, and we love to talk 
about it, and we will use every necessary 
meaus and make every effort to obtain it 
without delay. Thus it should be by all 
means with us in regard to our salvation. 
'Phis should always be in our minds ; we 
should converse about it when we meet to- 
gether, and encourage each other to seek 
after it and to value it above everything 
else, since we can obtain nothing that is 
better neither in time nor in eternity. About 
what do we converse when we meet togeth- 
er? Is it not frequently too much, or alto- 
gether about temywral or earthly things, if 
not even vain and idle talk and foolish 
jestiug ? “ Out of the abundance of the 

heart the mouth speaketh.” O how shall we 
escape if we so lightly esteem this great 
salvation, for which the blood of the Lamb 
was shed ? O let us consider what we have 
cost, and how abundantly the love of God 
has manifested itself towards us, and for 
this reason let us strive and contend, and 


apprdacheth nearer every day and every 
hour, if we are in Jesus and have his Spirit 
and walk after the Spirit. “Let us therefore 
cast off the works of darkness, and let us put 
on the armor of light,” Rom. 13: 11, 12. 

But also a word to the impenitent, who 
read or hear this article, know ye that 
except ye turn and become new creatures, 
your “damnation slumbereth not” (2 Pet. 
2 : 3), but also every day it cometh nearer, 
therefore “awake, (0 awake) thou that 
sleepest and arise from the dead and Christ 
shall give thee light.” O do not wait, ye 
poor sinners, for a more convenient season, 
for the longer you wait and put it off, the 
faster Satan will bind you ; 0, do resist him 
and he will flee from you; draw nigh to 


God and he will draw nigh to you ; seek 
the Lord while he may be found, call upon 
him while he is near ; 0 do allow yourselves 
to be moved and come to Jesus ; believe in 
him and yield yourselves in obedience unto 
him, and ye shall be saved. 


Human life is very insecure, therefore 
“boast not thyself of to-morrow, for thou 
knowest not what a day may bring forth.” 
“Behold now is the accepted time, behold 
now is the day of salvation.” “ Repent ye 
therefore and be converted, that your sins 
may be blotted out when the times of refresh- 
ing shall come from the presence of the Lord.” 
“Repent and be baptized every one of you 
in the name of Jesus Christ, for the remission 
of sins, and ye shall receive the giiit of the 
Holy Ghost,” for how will you escape if you 
neglect so great salvation ? The great day 
of the Lord will, finally come, and that 
without fail, “As a thief in the night, in the 
which the heavens shall pass away with a 
great noise, and the elements shall melt 
with fervent heat ; the earth also and the 
works that are therein shall be burned up. 
Seeing then that all these things shall be 
dissolved, what manner of persons ought ye 
to be in all holy conversation and godliness,” 

2 Pet. 3: 10. “For ye yourselves know 
perfectly that the day of the Lord so cometh 
as a thief in the night; for when they shall 
say, Peace and safety, then sudden destruc- 
tion cometh upon them * * * and they shall 
tillio i vaouu iV/U um own v uu\t wutvmtj uuv« i not escape,” 1 Thess. 5: 2,3. But we also 
tight earnestly against the enemy of souls ! who are ministers, that are placed as watch- 
and not be weary, for he is feeking to devour l men over the souls of men, “as they who 
our souls eternally. Now. it is yet possible i must give account,” should especially value 
for us to escape from the destroyer, if we this great salvation very highly, for it is our 
walk in the narrow way, and contiuue in the duty to reccommcnd it very highly to our 
good fight, and cease not therefrom. There- ■ hearers, and to seek to bring them to love it, 
lore watch at all times and pray that ye and to show them and explain to them how 
may be accounted worthy to escape, all these it may be obtained ; and also earnestly to 
things (mark) that shall come to pass in I warn them of the great danger to which 
the day of judgment, and to stand before they are exposed if they neglect this great 
the Son of Man, Luke 21 ; 36. salvation. But if we ourselves neglect it, 

Herein the Savior shows us how we may our preaching will be vain, 
escape; if we are careful, continue in prayer, Paul, no doubt, esteemed the salvation of 
and make use of the time and the means man very highly. Therefore he made so 
of grace ; in other words, if we have ret/aril many dangerous journeys and preached the 
to mlvation, Luke 21 : 36. gospel unto many nations. The Ephesians 

And now that we know this, namely, that he warned day and night with tears, for the 
the day and the hour for us to awake Out of space of three years. However terrible his 
sleep is at bund, inasmuch as our salvation is persecutions were, yet did he not become 
now nearer than when we believed, yea, it i disheartened, neither could he be silenced 


by men lie was not ashamed of the gospel, 

“for it is the power of God unto salvation.” 
‘•Woe unto me,” says he “ if I preach not 
the gospel. If I do this thing willingly 1 
have a reward ; but if against my will, a 
dispensation of the gospel is committed unto 
me,” 1 Cor. 9 : 16, 17. But we should not 
do it willingly for the reason that we think 
we are so competent, or for the purpose of 
acquiring a reputation before men; I’or it we 
are competent or able, “our sufficiency is of 
God,” but we should do it willingly, prompted 
by pure love to win souls, that they may be 
saved. Neither should we do it for “filthy 
lucre’s, sake, 'as a great many do, but of a 
ready mind.” We should also be “ cn- 
samples to the flock.” Paul could say, 

“ Be ye followers of me, even as I also am 
of Christ.” lie sought not the honor of 
men. “If I yet pleased men,” says he, “1 
should not be the servant of Christ,” Gal. 

1 : 20. To Timothy he writes, “Preach the 
word ; be instant in season, out of season ; 
reprove, rebuke, exhort,” &c. We are to 
preach the word “ whether they will hear or 
whether they will forbear.” Bear brethren 
and fellow-laborers in the vineyard of the 
Lord, whosoever ye may be that read this; 
also ye brethren on the other side of the great 
ocean, we would also include you. Let us 
not be slothful nor indifferent in this great 
and important work that is committed to us, 
namely, to lead precious souls through the 
gospel to Jesus Christ that they may be 
eternally saved, for we have to give an ac- 
count of our stewardship. Paul says, “ Let a 
man so account of us, as of the ministers of 
Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 
Moreover it is required in stewards that a 
man be found faithful.” Faithfulness is un- 
doubtedly required of us, bnt. is not our 
preaching sometimes as though it were com- 
pulsory, and not as of a willing mind and in 
sincerity of heart ? Bo we not sometimes 
feel as though we would rather attend to 
our temporal labors and not go to preach ? 
Let us be on our guard and give that which 
is best the precedence, for “they that be 
wise (German translation, the teachers), shall 
shine as the brightness of the firmament, 
and they that turn many to righteousness, as 
the stars forever and ever.” AVe may also 
apply to us what Ezekiel says, 33 : 6, “ But 
if the watchman see the sword come, and 
blow not the trumpet, and the people be not 
warned ; if the sword come and take any 
person from among them, he is taken away 
in his iniquity; but his blood will I require 
at his hand;” and in the 9th verse, “Never- 
theless if thou warn the wicked of his way 
to turn from it ; if he do not turn from his 
way, he shall die in his iniquity; but thou 
hast delivered thy soul.” Therefore, ( > 
brethren, let us be in earnest, “cry aloud, 
spare not,” yea let us lift up our voices like 
a trumpet and show the people their trans- 
gressions and their sins, for neither can wo 
escape if we are not faithful in our 
calling. 

If we should discover that any of our 
fellow men were traveling on a road leading 



1872 


115 


HERALD OF TRUTH. 


to a terrible precipice, or to a place where 
there were numerous, ravenous, wild beasts, 
serpents or murderers, where we knew they 
would be in danger of their lives, if they 
did not turn and retrace their steps, would 
we not earnestly warn them and present to 
them the danger before them ? Beyond a 
doubt we would do it, and it would also be 
our most solemn duty to do so. But now 
when we see so many thousands of our fel- 
low-men traveling on the way that leads 
down to the lake of fire and brimstoue, yea 
uuto eternal fire and the damnation of hell, 
to the murderer of souls, the devil and his 
angels, should we not also warn them with 
all the powers we have, that they might, for 
God’s sake, turn from such a dangerous 
way and cuter upon the safe and narrow way 
of life ? especially when we feel that we are 
called by the Lord to do this very thing. 

The difference between eternal salvation 
and eternal torment and suffering is too 
great for us watchmen to hold our peace, or 
to become lukewarm and indifferent. There- 
fore let us be diligent while it is day, for the 
night cometh when no man can work. Let 
us try to win souls and pluck them from the 
tire, wherever we can, so that iu the end 
we must not be cast out as unprofitable 
servants, into outer darkuess, where there is 
weeping and gnashing of teeth, but that we 
may all be able to hear, “ AVcll done, thou 
good and faithful servant, thou hast been 
faithful over a few things ; I will make 
thee ruler over many things; enter thou into 
the joy ot thy Lord.” 

I still feel pressed to say a few words to 
you who are still walking ou the broad way. 
O, how much I would like to give you a 
good advice, if you only will take heed 
unto it. I would that you may escape ever- 
lasting destruction and obtain eternal salva- 
tion with the people of God. AVill you not 
believe that there is great danger in the 
way, if ye do not turn and become obedient 
to the saving doctrine of Christ ? O, do 
permit youselves to be warned, for ii ye live 
after the flesh ye shall die, says the Scrip- 
ture. Now I ask you. O reasonable man, if 
you were in danger ot your life from tire or 
water, would you not make every effort to 
escape if it were yet possible ? Or, if you 
knew that murderers or wild beasts were 
seeking your life, would you not make an 
effort to avoid them and escape ? of course 
you will answer that you would. But now 
that you are in constant danger ot eternal 
lire and the murderer of souls, who is seek- 
ing to devour you and to cast you into 
eternal destruction, why arc you so indiffer- 
ent and yet refuse to hear and obey Jesus 
your best friend, who speaks to you front 
heaven, both by his own lips aud the lips 
of others, and invites and calls you . O • 
poor mortal, do take advice in the day ot 
grace, if you do not wish to be eternally 
Tost. AVill you consciously aud willingly cast 
yourself into hell, or will you “treasure up 
unto yourself wrath against the day ot wrath, 
and revelation of the righteous judgment ot 
God ?” Rom. 2 : 5, 


It troubles me, and often pains me in my 
heart when I see how vain and daring and 
forgetful of God mankind live in the world, 
just as though they did not at all believe 
that there was a God or a devil ; or as 
though there was neither heaven nor hell, 
neither eternul salvation nor eternal damna- 
tion to await. “ O, that they were wise, that 
they understood this, that they would consider 
their latter end !” Awake ! O ye sleepers ! 
how will ye escape ? 

I also feel deeply grieved and oftentimes 
it is to me a cause of great sorrow and sad- 
ness when I think of my friends, my ac- 1 
quaintances and my near relatives (whom 1 
sincerely love and wish them the greatest 
happiness), when 1 discover in them still 
such great lukewarmness and indifference in 
regard to their religious duties aud obliga- 
tions. O 1 do awake, turn ! turn ! and do 
not be so careless, so cold ! Beath aud the 
Judge arc approaching. AVatch, pray, strive 
and fight, aud ye shall fiually obtain the crown 
of righteousness and be happy. 

But especially dear to my heart are my 
own dear children and grand-children, all of 
whom I would like so much to meet in heav- 
en. O that not one of them may remain 
behind. 0 that they may esteem salvation 
above all things, and that none may neglect it, 
or permit himself or herself to be misled or 
allured by the vain and deceptive world ! O 
how sad, how sad would this be ! God grant 
that this admouition may serve as an alarm, 
a warning aud encouragement after I am 
gone the way of all flesh, yea, may it then 
yet even seem to them as often as- they 
read it, as though I was still calling to them 
with the words, How will you escape if you 
neglect so great salvation ? A ca may this 
allumportant question become so deeply 
rooted in their minds that it may never be 
forgotten by them, and by the blessing of 
| God keep them awake, so that they may 
worship God aud serve him only. Amen. 

In conclusion, I wish that all who may 
read or hear this admouition, may not lightly 
esteem it, but earnestly reflect upon it, for 
we have only mice to travel through this 
vale of tears, and if we neglect salvation 
here, it will be forever lost. Therefore, your 
friend and well-wisher would warn you all, 
ye fellow mortals. Alay God grant his bless- | 
in tr to this imperfect writing that it may re- 
dound to his honor.to the eucouragementand 
eternal salvation of many who read and hear 
it, through Jesus Christ. Amen. 


Translated from the “Ueinetudoldatt.” 


Origin of the Mennonlte Church, and 
the Life of Menno. 


Continued. 

From these words of Meuno, we can 
plainly see that ho did not belong to the 
riotous, fanatical sect of Munsleritos, neither 
did lie unite with them, but on the contrary 
was opposed to that doctrine and life, and 
with unwavering firmness warned them 


against them. Being falsely accused by his 
opponents and enemies, that he belonged to 
them, or that he descended from them, be- 
cause he as well as they rejected infant 
baptism, he Bays in his writings, “A humble 
AND CHRISTIAN DEFENSE,” as follows : 

« But if they should say that we are one 
church with the Munsterites, because they 
and we are baptized with one baptism, then 
would reply : If outward baptism has the 
power to make all those who are thus bap- 
tized with one baptism, one church, and 
that it causes all those who are thuB bap- 
tized to share in the unrighteousness, wick- 
edness, and corruption ot every individual, 
then our adversaries may well consider what 
kind of a church or body theirs is, as it is 
evident and well known to all that perjur- 
ers, murderers, highwaymen, thieves, en- 
chanters, &c., have received the same bap- 
tism which they have. If we then are Muu- 
sterites because of our baptism, they must 
be perjurers, murderers, highway - men, 
thieves, and enchanters on account of their 
baptism. If they maintain the first they 
cannot deny the latter. 

The Holy Scripture does not teach that 
we arc baptized into one body by any out- 
ward sign, but that we are baptized into one 
body by one Spirit,” 1 Cor. 12 : 13. 

Menno began his ministry in the year 
1537. “He knew that misery, ignominy, 
and persecution awaited him, and such did 
await him in full measure. Of the first 
years of bis labors, there was but little re- 
ported; yet he must soon have made a sig- 
nificant appearance by his own, as well as 
his opponents, because on that account he 
was already persecuted by the magistracy. 
Menno himself tells us, ‘That in the year 153 < 
or 1538, a man who was much esteemed and 
highly respected, wickedly advised that, 
they should exterminate him with the pious. 
His words were hardly tiuisbed before the 
avenging hand of the Lord was laid upon 
him and be dropped dead at the table. 

About the same time it happened to an- 
other man, who thought that he would so 
set his trap that I could not escape, that he, 
at the same meal he was eating while speak- 
iug these words, was suddenly stricken 
with a severe disease, and within eight days 
of the time he spake these words he was 
buried.’ Thus the office of Menno very- 
soon brought persecution. Perhaps he had 
already obtained the name of Elder or 
Bishop. He was obliged to travel among 
the scattered churches, and assemble with 
them at night in barns, iu the fields or in 
the woods ; otltimes several churches came 
together, sang hymns (which were com- 
posed and sang by martyrs on their way tn 

the place of execution), encouraging ad- 
dresses were delivered, or a portion of the 
Holy Scriptures was read, and where some- 
times thousands were baptized and partook 
of the Holy Supper, after which they quiet- 
ly separated, aud he departed to other 
churches.”* 

* Roosen’a life of Menno. 


HZEIR/J^LID OF TRUTH. 


gutfl. 


He 'was one of the most eminent teachers “At one time a faithless brother, who yet 
and bishops in that bloody and perilous attended their meetings, agreed for a stip- 
time, and one especially gifted and possessed ulated sum of money to deliver Menno into 
with strong natural abilities, and was a very the hands of his enemies, or forf eit his own 
fluent and eloquent speaker. In his ex- head. Once he arrived near the place ol 


truded itself into the episcopacy. To what 
place Menno went from Cologne, or whither 
he sojourned in the following years is en- 
tirely unknown. Only here and there do 
we hear of him; that about the year 155‘j, 


written, kind admonition or instruction 
from the word of God, how a Christian 
should be disposed ; and concerning the 
shunning and separation of the unfaithful 
brethren and sisters,” from which a few 
clauses will follow: “Therefore I admonish 
all our beloved brethren and sisters in the 
Lord, so precious as is Christ Jesus to you, 
never to let it go out of your mind, but ever 
to remember for what purpose you are 


hortations and writings from the word of meeting, but Menno, through the providence lie sojourned in the vicinity ol the Baltic 
God, he was so exuberant in his words that of God, made his e s cape at the right time. Sea, and as far as Livonia, and that none 
none of his adversaries dare venture to hold At another time as this same traitor, in but he alone, in all that distance, in the 
a discussion with him, on the divine truth, company with an ofliccr, were in search ol churches, performed baptism ; so it appears 
although he frequently and earnestly re- Menno, they unexpectedly met him in a that Menno was the only bishop in all that 
quested them to do so. Through his salu- boat on the canal. Without hindrance he region. In this time he. may .well have 

tary doctrine, Christian exhortations, and left Menno pass by, and after he had passed written, “ kind admonition or instruction 

the co-operating power of the Holy Spirit, some distance, and had leaped ashore, and from the word of God, how a chriBtian 
a great multitude of people were drawn went into the country, the traitor then cried should be disposed ; and concerning the 
from darkness and converted to the living out, ‘ Behold the bird has escaped.’ The shunning and separation of the unfaithful 
God. For this reason his adversaries were officer chastised him, and called him a villain, brethren and sisters, from which a few 
very much embittered against him, and in he answered : “I could not speak, for my clauses will follow: ‘‘Iherefore I admonish 
order to suppress such things, in the year tongue was bound.” But he had to pay the all our beloved brethren and sisters in the 
1543, the inhuman edict was issued against penalty with his life.” Lord, so precious as is Christ Jesus to you, 

him, and proclaimed throughout Friesland, At one time Menno entered a cloister, never to let it go out of your mind, but ever 

in which ho was declared an outlaw ; and and began a conversation with the superior to remember for what purpose you are 
any person who in any way sheltered him, concerning papistical errors, and earnestly called, taught, and baptized. Remember 
rendered him any assistance, conversed with exhorted him to repentance. Although he the covenant of the most high God, that into 
him, or took any of his books, should suffer observed that his name, and a description which you have so voluntarily entered, de- 
death. They also had his likeness taken, of his clothing, and form was nailed to the sired, and accepted, being taught by the 
which was posted on the church doors, and church doors, and besides a promise of a word of God, and operated upon by the 
public places. By thus decree, a general hundred florins (guilders) to him who would Holy Spirit; and remember that according 
pardon, the favor of the Emperor, freedom discover, and deliver him into the hands of to the doctrine of Paul, you have voluntarily 
of the country, and besides, one hundred the magistracy. At Eenigenburg, a village buried in baptism, all your covetousness 
Garl Guilders was promised to any criminal, of North Holland, Menno entered a church, (desire to sin), and that you are arisen with 
even murderers, if they would deliver Men- and after the priest had performed his ser- Christ Jesus, into newness of life, Iiom. 0 ; 
no Simon into the hands of the tormentors vices, Menno commenced to converse with which new life is nothing else but right- 
and executioners ; also pardon was promised the priest in Latin about the papistic super- eousness, unblamableness, love, mercy, hu- 
for casual heresy, if the heretic would re- stitions with such fluency and profoundness, mility, patience, peace, truth, yea, the whole, 
pent and return to, and be in union with that it made a deep impression on the priest, gentle life which is taught by the gospel, and 
the Catholic church. who soon thereafter resigned his office. was found in Christ Jesus. 

Tn one of his works, Menno complains As Menno with several other persons, was O, brethren, how far some of us are, alas 
that the persecution against him at this one day traveling, in a coach, they were yet distant from the evangelical life which 
time continued to increase, so that nowhere overtaken by the police, who asked about is of God 1 Notwithstanding that they stay 
could he even find a hut, in which lie could Menno and who, unknown to any of them out of other churches, and areoutwardlybap- 
iiuietly live with his wife and little children, sat beside the coachman. Without mani- tized with water, they are vet carnal, and 


that the persecution against him at this one day traveling, in a coach, they 
time continued to increase, so that nowhere overtaken by the police, who asked ; 
could he even find a hut, in which he could Menno and who, unknown to any of 
quietly live with his wife and little children, sat beside the coachman. Without 
for a year, or a half year, in peace. What festing auy signs of alarm, lie turned ai 
unmercifulness was manifested towards those to those who sat behind him and said, “ It is 
who afforded shelter to Menno, the following asked if Menno Simon is in the coach ?” and 
history bears testimony when they replied no, he turned to the offi- 

In the year 1539, Tjaert Reyndertz, a cers and said, “ The lords say, No.” This 
friend and brother of Menno, who lived anecdote shows us Menno’s presen 
near Harlingen, in Friesland, out of com- mind, but nothing of sinful prudence. 


one day traveling, in a coach, they were yet distant from the evangelical life which 
overtaken by the police, who asked about is of God 1 Notwithstanding that they stay 
Menno and who, unknown to any of them out of other ehurches, and are outwardly bap- 
sat beside the coachman. Without mani- tized with water, they are yet carnal, and 
festing auy signs of alarm, lie turned around devilishly minded in all things, thinking 


perhaps that Christianity consists of outward 
baptism and non-atteridance of the church. 
No, beloved, No ! I tell you as truly as the 
Lord lives, before God avails no outward 


passion and brotherly love, secretly enter- 
tained Menno in his house. When his 
enemies discovered this, Tjaert was appre- 
hended, and taken to Leeuwarden, where he 
was tried and tormented in a cruel manner, 
ho as to oblige him to inform them where I 
Menno was secreted, who yet heard of the I 
approach of his enemies in time to escape 
from their hands. When Tjaert refused to 
tell where Menno was, preferring to yield 
his own life, so as to save the life of his 
friend, he was cruelly put to death by 
breaking him on the wheel, although his 
enemies bore testimony that he was a pious 
man. lie literally fulfilled the words of the 
apostle, “We ought to lay down our lives for 
the brethren,” 1 Jn. 3: Hi. 

What Menno had to suffer for Christ, and 
his word’s sake, and how the Lord preserv- 
ed him from slander, and delivered him 


anecdote shows us Menno s presence of baptism, nor staying away from the church, 
mind, but nothing of sinful prudence. nor supper if not accomplished by the divine 

In the year 1544, Menno left the Noth- commandments, ] Cor. 7 ; but faith which 
orlands, in which he could no longer reside. WO rketh by love,” Gal. 5 : (5. 

Also in East Friesland, a command was is- of the admittance of a fallen, but repent 
sued by the governess, Maria, that all the ant brother or sister, Menno says, “ If In 
anabaptists should be driven out of the con fess his fall, if lie be sorry, promise re 
country. Likewise in Groningen, where Men- formation, show signs of repentance, and 
no had sometimes resided, the emperor acknowledge his transgressions, then no 
issued an edict the 3lst of August, in which, matter how he has transgressed, receive him 
among others, Menno was expressly men- as a returning brother or sister, but beware, 
tioned. Sometime in the spring of this lesfc he mock his God ; for the acceptation 
year, he went to Cologne, where many on of brethren does not avail if we be not 
account of their iaith found protection ; 


account ol tlieir laitu louncl protection; accep t e d of God.” He shows from the 
where the then reigning arch-bishop and s cri ptures that the ban or separation is not 
elector ol Gologne, Graf Hermann of W ced, a work 0 f hatred, but is a great work of love, 
looked upon the reformation with favor, and not a work of depravation, but of refer 
Menno could labor here with great success. lli;i -ion. ( To be continued. ) 

In about two years (1546), he was obliged 

to leave Gologne with his sick wife, in order “ • * 

to escape greater perils. The university He that keepeth the commandment (of the 


( To be continued. ) 


his word’s sake, and how the Lord preserv- to escape greater perils. The university He that keepeth the commandment (of the 

ed him from slander, and delivered him and clergy had succeeded so far, that pope Lord) keepeth his own soul ; but he that dc- 
from the hands of his enemies, also his Haul III, excommunicated the arch-bishop, piseth his ways shall die. He that hath pity 

i l it i rt i iii i i « ■ i i • « . _ L * 


courage and zeal may be learned from the 


following 


1 lermann, and removed his worthy elector, upon the poor lendetli unto the Lord ; and that 
whereupon the rigid Catholicism again in- which he hath given will he pay him again 


HERALD OF TFLTXTZEE. 


For the Herald of Truth. 


Satan’s Sacrament. 


itively sinful ; or whether on the 
other hand, they would voluntarily 

-1 1 1 i 4 n l _ i. - lL 


“Ye cannot drink of the cup of the s 
Lord and the cup of devils ; ye cannot 
lie partakers of the Lord’s table, and of 
the table of devils,” 1 Cor. 10: 21. “ 

c 

It costs us an effort to understand r 
the temptation, to the early Chris- Q 
tians, to mingle in idolatrous festiv- ^ 
ities ; and to estimate rightly the a 
danger to which their piety was ^ 
tliereby exposed. We forget that c 
we are living in Christian society, • 
in a community where no one wor- e 
ships idols, and no one pays respect t 
to idolatrous usages. It was very , 
different with the Corinthian chris- 
tians. They were in the midst of ^ 
pagan institutions. They had to t 
breathe the atmosphere of pagan 
ideas, and to come in contact every- j 
where with pagan usages. To sep- . 
arate themselves from all these and ^ 
to pursue a course which would give ^ 
no contenance to idolatry was ex- . 
ceedingly difficult. It required ^ 
thought and study and prayer and 
no little self-denial. From many 
an attractive scene must the chris- ! 
tian in Corinth (as in all other pi a- ' 
ces) about himself; from many a 
pleasant companionship must he 
withdraw himself ; many a valuable 
friendship must he imperil or for- 
feit ; to many a scene and taunt 
must he subject himself, and to 
many an imputation of narrowness 
and conceit. and bigotry, if he would 
be sure of giving all his influence 
in favor of the spirituality and the 
purity of Christianity. 

Probably it would not alwa 3 r s be 
easy to draw the line of separation. 
There would sometimes be ques- 
tionable instances, room for sincere 
doubt, questions in regard to one’s 
personal practice, and questions as 
to the kind and degree of restraint 
that should be put upon one’s chil- 
dren, and question to the deference 
which ought to be shown to the opin- 
ions and scruples and even to the 
weakness of one’s brethren- We 
have intimation and traces of all 
these in Paul’s epistles. . 

It propably would have been in- 
teresting to notice in Corinth, at that 
time, to which side different classes 
of church members would lean in 
such doubtful cases ; to which side 
they would give the benefit of the 
doubt: whether, on the one hand, 
they would claim (as it is too often 
done at the present time), as a priv 
ilege, every degree of indulgence 
which could not be shown to bepos 


deny themselves*of whatsoever they 
saw reason to fear, or knew that 


their brethren feared, might have f 
an unfavorable bearing upon the £ 
cause of Christ. We cannot help c 
regarding such things as indications £ 
of character. They always seem to i 
tell the inclination of our minds, \ 
and show where the deepest aftec- j t 
tion of our hearts rests ; they indi- 1 1 
cate how far our hearts are engaged < 
in the cause of religion, and wheth- 
er we would rather suffer self-denial, i 
than to see tlio cause of Christ and 1 
his church suffer loss, or whether we : 
would sooner see the ordinances of 1 
God violated and his Spirit grieved, 1 
than to cause ourselves any incon- i 
venience by denying ourselves and ^ 
keeping the love of God uppermost i 
in our hearts. We can easily see that j 
it must have been so in Corinth in the 
first century. Let us not doubt that 
it is so here and now, and it will al- 
ways remain so. 

There is the same occasion for care, 
and thought, and prayer and self- 
denial and resolute determination, 
here and now, as in Corinth then. 
We are mixed in social and civil re- 
lations with worldly and ungodly 
multitudes. The majority of those 
among whom we live are no Chris- 
tians ; have not “ professed and call- 
ed themselves Christians,’’ in any 
but that general and latitudinanan 
sense which commits them to noth- 
ing that is distinctive of Christianity ; 
they have not taken the yoke of Chr ist 

upon them ; they have not striven to 
enter in at the strait gate, and have 
no present thought or purpose of do- 
in o- so. There are many Christian 
usages indeed, to which these class- 
es assent ; such, for example, as 
attendance, with decent order and 
decorum, on public Sabbath services, 

. the suspending of ordinary business 
and labor on tbe Sabbath,. etc. In 
i many such things our society and 
; our civilization and even our legis- 
I lation and jurisprudence, have be 
come to a certain extent clnistian- 
ized. Yet there remain many usages 
t and fashions among us into which 
3 nothing of the spirit of Christianity 
r» enters ; which are manifestly and 
e distinctly of the world, in opposi- 
chTtsf ! which are loved and 


tion to Christ ; which are loved and 
delighted in, just in proportion as 
vital piety is wanting, and for which 
the really devout and godly have 
no relish. 

Some of these, it must plainly be 


said, have tlieir real zest and rel- 
ish from the same inspiration, and 
make their appeal precisely to the 
same susceptibilities as did the pa- 
gan rites in the worship of Bacchus 
and of Venus, the deities of intoxi- 
cation and lust. These are indeed 
adorned and concealed by refine- 
ment, etiquette and by courtesy 
which are beautiful and lovely to 
the outward eye, and the worldly 
heart, but which cannot hallow that 
depravity which they embellish. 

IfPaul, or John, or Peter were alive 
now, or any of those pious women 
whom Paul mentions so affection- 
ately, “the beloved Persis, who la- 
bored much in the Lord,” “Priscil- 
la,” his “helper in Christ Jesus,” 
and such as they, or that “elect la- 
dy ” to whom John inscribed his 
second epistle, or that Eunice on 
whose lap young Timothy learned 
the Holy Scriptures— if any of these 
were with us, who doubts how they 
would act in regard to attendance 
upon, or countenance of the gay and 
worldly scenes of amusement and 
fashion ? Or who doubts how the 
discriminatingPaul and John would 
regard those disciples who should 
frequent such scenes. Who really 
and honestly doubts how they are 
regarded by Christ, whose eye does 
behold every stray disciple of his 
who consents to be in such places ? 
The book he gives them, if only there 
eyes were opened to see it, would 
smite them like that look which he 
turned and cast upon Peter when he 
had denied him in Pilate's hall. 

In order to be consistent chris- 
tians, we must renounce and dis- 
countenance many worldly practi- 
ces which may not be condemned on 
mere grounds of morality, but which 
s are distinctively and characteristie- 
[ , ally ungodly, devoted and tending 
to that worldliness which a chris 
1 tian has just as much to get lid ot, 
i in order to be ripe and ready for heav- 
l en, as of any plain immorality. 

Beware of what Paul so bitterly 
stigmatizes “as the table oj d evils. 

- Be not partakers of Satan s sacra 
3 m ent. l)rinknotof“^ec?//J,of<fer- 
i ils." Not in any of its enticing 
/ | forms let it ever touch youi lips » 
1 from its fascinating surroundings 
l- keep yourselves far, far away, 
d I Pay no homage at the shrine of 
s Bacchus; linger not near the pres- 
h ence of his temples ; smell not the 
e I alluring odors ol his sacrifices. And 

Oh, ye Christian women, and chns- 
>e I tian maidens, lend not your infiu- 



ZELFF--A-XjID of tbtjth. 




ence nor looks of approval nor in alone will not make men wise unto 
any ’way countenance the worship- salvation. A man may believe the 
era who throng the. doors of her Bible and yet be far from God. 

n . .1 -rv • 1 1 1 • iU . .ww Tl/-\t 


temple whose way is the way to 
hell, going down to the chambers 
of death. H. A. N. 

. mm 9 ^ 

For the Herald of Truth. 

Faith. 

The doctrine of faith in common 
with all Bible doctrines is one wor- 
thy our closest and most prayerful 
study “For without faith it is im- 
possible to please God.” Faith acts 
an important part in the affairs of 
this world. It precedes all knowl- 
edge, for man with his imperfections 
of judgment and short-sightedness 
has not the powers of mind to inves- 
tigate and comprehend all he comes 
in contact with. All research either 
of science or revelation points us to 
God as the great fountain of wisdom 
and knowledge and beyond this we 


and experience such as will warrant me in 
adhering to their counsel ? The same rule 
will apply in reference to things of a divine 
nature. “ The heart of man is deceitful and 


-r^ •, , , ■ < 4.1, ova nnf nature. • rue neari ui man is ucucmui anu 

Devils believe y y above all things, desperately wicked,” and 

saved- Man has a heait, min , m advise us through sinister motives, 

will. All these must be consecrated . hnw , vftr nn i v i )0 so i n reference 


to the Lord if we would please him. 
Saving faith demands that we be- 
lieve not only that the Bible is true, 


This, however, can only he so in reference 
to the means that God has employed for 
the salvation of the soul. When we are ad- 
vised to forsake sin, and accept the means 


but also that our hearts trust in the t ] iat God has given for the cleansing of the 
redeeming power of Christ. To all soul, we cannot err in adhering to it, but 
this the will must freely consent, when it comes to determining what these 
The faith which pleases God re- means are, then we should be on the alert 
liounces self, lays all upon the altar as to their motives and the knowledge they 
and says with Job, “Though thou have of true Christianity 
Slav me, yet will I trust in thee.” We have now noticed that counsel is 
J J good, and it is our duty to receive it from 


The Great Counselor. 

“ I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried 
in fire that thou mayest be rich,” Rev. 
3 : 18. 

lu this text we have presented, a wbe 
counselor, the advice he gave, and the re-r 


the relation which we sustain to each other. 
We now have in view a counselor that from 
the rela'ion we sustain to him, we are placed 
under obligations to receive his counsel. 
This counselor is Jesus, and is the one re- 
ferred to in the text. We have already no- 
ticed that it is our duty to receive advice 
from an earthly counselor, and that we must 
be able to decide for ourselves whether it 


cannot go, but we must exercise faith counselor tbe advice ne gave, ana me be able to decide lor ourselves whether i 
in him? or our knowledge is value- «ult of adhering to it. Solomon isays, where is proper to adhere to it ; but the counsel 
less. Without this faith man could no counsel is, the people fall. II.® truth of that Jesus gives it ts not only our dutv to 
, f , ,, . n +r. this declaration is frequently demonstrated. receive, but it should be brought to bear, 

not ive, or le wot C . ‘ } When men have so much confideuce in